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Source: (consider it) Thread: AS: The Ship of Fools Recipe Book
jlg

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Why am I here?
# 98

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I agree that pre-grated cheese is dis.gust.ing. (Except for this half cheddar/half mozz that I get in bulk through my food co-op -- it's pretty good.) I have it in my frig because I have teens in the house who think boiling water on the stove to make mac and cheese from a box is gourmet cooking. They use the pre-grated cheese to make nachos in the microwave. Why waste good cheese and effort on people with no sense of taste?

I grew up with a mother who always followed recipes to the letter. She would chop up an onion, measure the stated 1/4 cup and then throw away the excess! And this was a recipe which would serve eight or more. [Roll Eyes] I didn't learn that you can cook by eyeball until I was an adult. On the other hand, people actively maneuvered to get on her list and receive a tin of Christmas cookies -- I've only met one person (a professional) who could bake cookies as good as my mom's.

Don't worry your pretty little head about those conversions, tomb; my slide rules are right here handy in my desk drawer and I like the metric system.

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
In
Beenster's fudge recipe all of the ingredients are given in metric. Does this cause a problem for North Americans? Do we need to convert the weights into cups for the recipe to be useful?

bb

I think that if there's a conversion table in the book, that would be sufficient. I'd rather get more recipes in from as many shipmates as possible, which means making submitting the recipes as hassle-free as possible. What I think might be a bigger problem is that terms for ingredients don't always translate. For instance, beenster's recipe calls for "double cream" and I'm not sure what that is. Perhaps a glossary would be a good idea.

[ 26. July 2003, 04:19: Message edited by: Mamacita ]

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
For instance, beenster's recipe calls for "double cream" and I'm not sure what that is.

Really?? Well, you can't do better than read Delia's words of wisdom on the subject. (Delia is a Font of Wisdom for many people over here and her books are very popular because her recipes actually work and taste good.) What is your name for double cream, then - or do you not have this?

[ 26. July 2003, 07:29: Message edited by: Ariel ]

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dolphy

Lady of Perpetual Responsiblity
# 862

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quote:
Originally posted by Thumbprint:
Measurements? Do people really cook with those? [Wink]

Are they want we more commonly call things like: a drizzle of oil, a pinch of salt, a slurp of wine etc? [Wink] [Razz]

--------------------
Looking forward to my rock moving closer again.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote from tomb
quote:
And my momma told me that "a pint's a pound"--but not an imperial pint, seemingly.
An American pint equals 2 8-ounce cups.
  • 2 cups white sugar weigh one pound.
  • 2 cups brown sugar weigh about 15 ounces.
  • 2 cups flour weigh approximately 8 ounces.

This is why I prefer to weigh dry ingredients.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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jedijudy*

Jedi defender of ship's cats
# 1059

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I generally cook by the "dump and pour" method, myself. However... Cheese grits recipe on its way, Mobo!

For those despairing of finding grits in the local grocery, generally if you ask the manager he or she can order them...at least here in the States.

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ENFP...do you see a "T" anywhere??? I don't think so.

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jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

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quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
In
Beenster's fudge recipe all of the ingredients are given in metric. Does this cause a problem for North Americans? Do we need to convert the weights into cups for the recipe to be useful?

bb

I think that if there's a conversion table in the book, that would be sufficient. I'd rather get more recipes in from as many shipmates as possible, which means making submitting the recipes as hassle-free as possible. What I think might be a bigger problem is that terms for ingredients don't always translate. For instance, beenster's recipe calls for "double cream" and I'm not sure what that is. Perhaps a glossary would be a good idea.
Everyone should feel free to submit their recipes in whatever form they use at home. I'm more than happy to help with coming up with "measured" equivalents (both metric and English/American) and I know that there are shipmates who are bilingual cooks and can be consulted when an internet search or common sense doesn't provide an answer.

babybear's prototype includes a glossary. There was a thread about a year ago where we discussed the different terms, types of sugars, etc., and while I believe it is gone, the knowledge is still out there. (Btw, I'm guessing double cream would be something like heavy cream or whipping cream in the US.)

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote from jlg
quote:
Btw, I'm guessing double cream would be something like heavy cream or whipping cream in the US.
I have the impression that double cream has a higher fat content than anything you will find in an American supermarket.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

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jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

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Probably true, especially with the current "health" emphasis in the dairy section. But the question will be whether there is an acceptable substitute.

Which is why I pointed out that the cookbook should have a general disclaimer that the recipes hadn't been tested to make sure they worked OK with the substitutions.

It should only really be a problem in making candy and perhaps some of the more sophisticated dessert recipes, where the interactions of the particular forms of sugar and the fat contents of the chocolate or whatever are crucial to the results. But even so, a lot of baked goods, while they may turn out differently than the original recipe intended, still turn out in a yummy form that people are happy to eat.

Savory dishes, as has been pointed out ("Hey, I've already modified your recipe!"), are pretty forgiving of changes. Simple baked goods, such as cornbread, are also pretty resilient.

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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I think it would be nice if people also submitted a few "traditional" recipes from their own countries as well as their own favourite dishes. I never knew what grits was until recently. It might be fun to try out a few of these things. Yes I know, I could look it up on the internet but it's nicer to have a recipe from someone you've heard of that they know works. Assuming the ingredients are readily available in other countries, that is.
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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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I like that idea, Ariel. And even if the recipe isn't entirely do-able (or just doesn't sound good to someone who didn't grow up with it), I find such exchanges to be a good way to increase our understanding of and appreciation of each other.

Here's another question. Is there a deadline by which you'd like to have the recipes? (I know the answer is "as soon as possible". My question is probably better translated as, "If I don't get my recipes to you in the next 24 hours, when I will be leaving on vacation, will I miss the boat entirely; or can I send them to you in 2 weeks?")
Thank you.
Mamacita, not trying to be a pain the neck

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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I have been rendering the recipes into HTML. So far I only have a very few recipes. Until more people send in recipes there is little I can do. I have also been trawling through the Recipe thread in Heaven.

The way that I am writing the SoF Cookbook webpages means that we will be able to add recipes to the selection as and when more recipes are submitted.

It might help people to submit recipes if we had a theme each fortnight. Since it is summer for most of us (and the Antipodean and southern African shipmates could probably do with being reminded of summer)- people please send me barbeque recipes. The nominal closing date for barbeque recipes is the 15th of August, but of course late comers will be able to sumbit too.

The barbeque recipes could be for meat, vegetarian, or sweet-stuff. I shall be submitting barbequed pineapple slices with ginger, and stuffed peppers with feta cheese and walnuts.

Please put your recipes on the Recipe thread in Heaven.

bb

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Babybear, did you get the ones I emailed you?

I hope you're going to have a fish/seafood section. Life (and cookery books) would not be complete without one.

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dolphy

Lady of Perpetual Responsiblity
# 862

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Motherboard,

To answer your question about the swede in my recipe, they are similar to turnips but much much nicer. They are large, round and yellow in colour...

If anyone could provide a link I would be most grateful.

[ 02. August 2003, 11:01: Message edited by: dolphy ]

--------------------
Looking forward to my rock moving closer again.

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Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
I shall be submitting barbequed pineapple slices with ginger, and stuffed peppers with feta cheese and walnuts.

Yum, those stuffed peppers were amazing.

I do a pretty mean veg and halloumi cheese kebab which is ideal for BBQ and ridiculously easy. However, the recipe really would be very haphazard as it's one of those "make up as you go along" things. Will do my best to put it into some sort of coherent form before the closing date.

--------------------
"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
wiblog blipfoto blog

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Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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quote:
Originally posted by dolphy:
To answer your question about the swede in my recipe, they are similar to turnips but much much nicer. They are large, round and yellow in colour...

If anyone could provide a link I would be most grateful.

I obviously have far too much time on my hands [Roll Eyes] I have just done a Google search and suspect that in the US a swede might be called a rutabaga (though don't quote me, I didn't spend hours researching).

The lovely Delia has come up trumps again - here for your delectation is her take on the swede.

--------------------
"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
wiblog blipfoto blog

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jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

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Yep, that's a rutabaga.
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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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The first 15 recipes are now up! SoF Cookbook. I have 10 more recipes to go up.

So far we have Avocado Mozzarella and Tomato Salad, Barbequed Spare Ribs, Barbeque Sauce, Calabacitas, Cheese Straws, Chicken with Honey and Mustard, Chicken Liver Pate, Devilled Eggs, Fudge, German Potato Salad, Meat and Quince Stew, Orange Glazed Chicken, Pineapple with Ginger, Scottish Tablet and Texas Caviar (Bean Salad).

Any more suggestions for bbq-ed food, either sweet or savory, or even a salad?

How about suggestions for chicken dishes?

Any offers for drinks?

bb

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
dolphy

Lady of Perpetual Responsiblity
# 862

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Any offers for drinks?

Yes, I'd love a glass of white wine. [Wink]

babybear, Motherboard has a recipe for Cornish pasties if you want to include them.

--------------------
Looking forward to my rock moving closer again.

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tomb
Shipmate
# 174

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I have e-mailed you my recipe for barbequed Beer-Butt Chicken.
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Ye Olde Motherboarde
Ship's Mother and Singing Quilter
# 54

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And for my 1,000th post!

Thanks from the recipe team for all your responses! We are thrilled at the outpouring, but why hasn't everyone [Paranoid] sent something in?

GET OFF THE LAWN CHAIRS! [Snigger]
STOP CUTTING THE GRASS! [Big Grin]
GET OUT OF THE CAR ON YOUR WAY TO THE BEACHES! [Razz]
GET TO A COMPUTER!

and SEND THOSE RECIPES!

Motherboard (a 'thousandaire', at last!) [Yipee]

--------------------
In Memory of Miss Molly, TimC, Gambit, KenWritez, koheleth, Leetle Masha, JLG, Genevieve, Erin, RuthW2, deuce2, Sidi and TonyCoxon, unbeliever, Morlader, Ken :tear: 20 years but who’s counting?..................

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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Yow! Okay, already! (Kenw rubs his arm) Some crazy lady out there twisted this until I came in and read the posts. What've we got? Hmmmm...oh, okay...yeah....yeah...uh huh...sheesh...ahhhhh, now I go it!

Just submitted my "Grandma' Smackin Tri-tip with Purple Gravy, Sauteed Onions and Tomatoes" to our girl Mobo. See what she and BB think.

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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I had a look at the online version. The illustrations are lovely! Suddenly I've acquired nice pictures on my recipes!

But someone's changed the measurements. I don't think I put "half a cup" of wine - and I definitely didn't put "3/4 stick" of butter. Now I'm confused. Who thinks in "sticks of butter"?

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I had a look at the online version. The illustrations are lovely! Suddenly I've acquired nice pictures on my recipes!

Glad you like them. I have been searching through clipart, and copying images and altering them.

quote:
But someone's changed the measurements. I don't think I put "half a cup" of wine - and I definitely didn't put "3/4 stick" of butter. Now I'm confused. Who thinks in "sticks of butter"?
I did. 1 stick of butter is 4 oz (100g). The metric quantities are given on the left of the ingredients and the imperial/cups are on the right. Where people have submitted recipes in tablespoons I have left them in tablespoon. There are some recipes that are only given in tablespoons, teaspoons, and dashes. eg Moo's Devilled Eggs so the amounts are only on the left side.

I am building a glossary. If you see any terms that you don't recognise please let me know. I am also constructing a table of "1 cup equals". When that table is a bit more complete I shall also be putting it on the website.

If you would like to submit a recipe please have a look at what is already up. Have a look at the way the recipes are laid out, and if at all posible please submit in a simial format. It make it much easier to get the recipes on-line.

Please start submitting vegetarian dishes.

bb

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Smudgie

Ship's Barnacle
# 2716

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bb, sorry to be a pain but in Zipporah's recipe for Tablet (mmmmmm) one of the ingredients is down as "ingredient". I am assuming that this should be butter.

--------------------
Miss you, Erin.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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That is not being a pain! That is being a good Smudgie! Thanks, I shall go change that and update it later today.

Please, please, if anyone sees any mistakes let me know.

bb

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Sine Nomine*

Ship's backstabbing bastard
# 3631

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Please start submitting vegetarian dishes.

I assume you will take what you want from the existing recipes on the recipe thread. Correct?

I posted a vegetarian lentil-cheese casserole on it a good while back.

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JB*

Horse marine
# 396

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quote:
Originally posted by Sine Nomine:
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Please start submitting vegetarian dishes.


Now that so many Californians are moving into Santa Fe we see lots of places, even Hispanic places, have added vegetarian sections to their menu. It's nice to have a use for them.

--------------------
You live, you learn. You learn, you live.

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by JB:
quote:
Originally posted by Sine Nomine:
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Please start submitting vegetarian dishes.


Now that so many Californians are moving into Santa Fe we see lots of places, even Hispanic places, have added vegetarian sections to their menu. It's nice to have a use for them.
Yes, vegetarians can be quite useful; chunked and diced, they make wonderful thickeners for soups and stews! [Big Grin]

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Sine Nomine*

Ship's backstabbing bastard
# 3631

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quote:
Originally posted by Kenwritez:
Yes, vegetarians can be quite useful; chunked and diced, they make wonderful thickeners for soups and stews!

And pies! The worst pies in London.
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Amazing Grace*

Shipmate
# 4754

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I had a look at the online version. The illustrations are lovely! Suddenly I've acquired nice pictures on my recipes!

Glad you like them. I have been searching through clipart, and copying images and altering them.

quote:
But someone's changed the measurements. I don't think I put "half a cup" of wine - and I definitely didn't put "3/4 stick" of butter. Now I'm confused. Who thinks in "sticks of butter"?
I did. 1 stick of butter is 4 oz (100g). The metric quantities are given on the left of the ingredients and the imperial/cups are on the right. Where people have submitted recipes in tablespoons I have left them in tablespoon. There are some recipes that are only given in tablespoons, teaspoons, and dashes. eg Moo's Devilled Eggs so the amounts are only on the left side.

I am building a glossary. If you see any terms that you don't recognise please let me know. I am also constructing a table of "1 cup equals". When that table is a bit more complete I shall also be putting it on the website.

If you would like to submit a recipe please have a look at what is already up. Have a look at the way the recipes are laid out, and if at all posible please submit in a simial format. It make it much easier to get the recipes on-line.

Please start submitting vegetarian dishes.

bb

I shall when I recover from Eevil Blaster.

I will also send along a link to an excellent "equivalents" page. 1 cup sugar is not the same weight as 1 cup flour!

Charlotte aka Amazing Grace (American who owns a kitchen scale)

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.sig on vacation

Posts: 2594 | From: Sittin' by the dock of the [SF] bay | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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I'm still confused, and trying to figure out the consistency of measurements. Are "cups" used for liquid measurements or dry ones? Are flour and onions and sugar and so on always measured in cups in America?
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Grits
Compassionate fundamentalist
# 4169

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quote:
I'm still confused, and trying to figure out the consistency of measurements. Are "cups" used for liquid measurements or dry ones?
Both. It's not done by weight but by volume.

quote:
Are flour and onions and sugar and so on always measured in cups in America?
Yes, almost always.

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Lord, fill my mouth with worthwhile stuff, and shut it when I've said enough. Amen.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by ariel:
Are flour and onions and sugar and so on always measured in cups in America?

Cups and tablespoons tend to be the main measuring devices used in America. Stick (of butter) are also used and then the fall-back is ounces.

There will of course be inaccuracies introduce when converting from one system to another, but so far we haven't got many recipes where that would actually made a great deal of difference. Most of the recipes so far have included the technical terms 'some', 'a bit' and 'a dash'. [Big Grin]

quote:
Are "cups" used for liquid measurements or dry ones?
1 cup of water is 240ml = 240g
1 cup of rice crispies is 30g
1 cup of butter is 250g = 2½ sticks

Only one of my own recipes uses cups, and that is porridge. [/i]¼ of a cup of oats, and ½ of water. Mix and pop in the microwave for 1 min. Stir. [/i] For most Americans, they will only have a few recipes that use weights rather than cups, tablespoons, sticks and dashes.

We also have a few problems because icing sugar doesn't exist in America, but confectionar's sugar is very similar. There is a similar problem with double cream and heavy cream, and then the cheeses too!

Most people who like cooking will use a recipe as a guide, and will happily subsititue ingredients or alter the amounts depending on their tastes. When using the recipes look on them as and adventure. Explore and play.

bb

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote from bb
quote:
1 cup of butter is 250g = 2½ sticks
[Confused] [Confused] [Confused]

This must be a British cup--10 fluid ounces.

An American cup is 8 ounces, and 1 cup butter = 2 sticks.

Moo

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Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote from bb
quote:
1 cup of butter is 250g = 2½ sticks
[Confused] [Confused] [Confused]

This must be a British cup--10 fluid ounces.

An American cup is 8 ounces, and 1 cup butter = 2 sticks.

Butter is never measured in fluid ounces as far as I know - just ordinary ounces. 250g is about 8 oz, or half a pound.

I give up - I guess if I had grown up with the system I would understand it better. Anyway, I think my recipes should work - enjoy!

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dolphy

Lady of Perpetual Responsiblity
# 862

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Butter is never measured in fluid ounces as far as I know

It might be if you left it out in the sun [Wink]

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Measuring cups measure in fluid ounces, as opposed to avoirdupois ounces, which are weight.

When an American recipe calls for a cup of flour, the flour is measured in fluid ounces even though the flour is not fluid.

Moo

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Out of curiosity do Australians and New Zealanders use those measurements too?
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multipara
Shipmate
# 2918

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Less and less. In the last 20 years metric measures have been the go here in Oz. The average measuring cup (for liquids) holds 500 ml (an Imperial pint is 600 ml).

The Commonsense Cookery Book (the beginner's bible)used imperial measures with appropriate cups, spoons etc. I picked up the 1995 version in a second-hand shop last year and it had gone metric.

It is still wonderfully useful, even though the editors have added some shockers especially in the "vegetarian" section.

My personal favourite is the Presbyterian Cookbook, which ( the version we had dated from 1960) was full of useful recipes for the Sabbath which could be done the day before and popped into the oven before morning church, ready to eat 2 hours later.

cheers all,

m

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quod scripsi, scripsi

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boofhead
Shipmate
# 4478

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I thought one metric cup was 250 ml.

Would it be possible to extend the cookbook to indicate leftovers potential?

As an aside, The Commonsense Cookery Book (in 2 volumes) is a great book. My Grandma introduced me to it at the age of 5? over 30 years ago when she let me help her make scones.

Unfortunately it is somewhat disorganised and the section in Volume 2 on refrigeration and leftovers could probably be expanded. (my whinge from consulting it last weekend to find out about the leftover potential of roast pork)

The pikelet recipe in the Commonsense Cookbook formed part of our staple diet for many years. We had pikelets (with jam and cream of course) for dinner on Saturday nights many times.

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My Grandma deserved praise for many things, not least that she introduced me to cooking

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Janine

The Endless Simmer
# 3337

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I have decided to convert my Creole recipe to "handfuls", "pinches", etc.

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frin

Drinking coffee for Jesus
# 9

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Metric cups are 250ml and hold 250ml of water. I can also report that I regularly cook from several US cookbooks (and random recipes of the internet) and the effect of using metric cups on the efficacy of recipes is negligible - even in baking cookies, cakes, etc.

'frin

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"Even the crocodile looks after her young" - Lamentations 4, remembering Erin.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote from bb
quote:
1 cup of butter is 250g = 2½ sticks
[Confused] [Confused] [Confused]

This must be a British cup--10 fluid ounces.

An American cup is 8 ounces, and 1 cup butter = 2 sticks.

Moo

I have a table that gives "1 cups equals", and that said that 1 cup of butter = 250g. I know that 1 stick of butter = 4oz = 100g, so by putting those together, I came up with a figure that 1 cups = 2½ sticks.

I shall change that to read that 1 cup = 200g = 8oz = 2 sticks. So far, I don't think that I have used anything other than portions of sticks of butter.

quote:
boofhead asked:
Would it be possible to extend the cookbook to indicate leftovers potential?

Sounds good. If a recipe can be cooked from frozen, etc then please do say. The recipe pages are laid out with the title, a picture, ingredients, method and then notes. The notes section would be a fantastic place to put that information.

We can introduce a 'Leftover' section, recipes that can be made from leftovers. Somethign I regularly do is to cook double quantities of bolognaise meat sauce, and freeze half. Then later in the week it is quick and easy to make a lasagne.

When I roast a chicken I make a lot of gravy, and then freeze what is not used. This can be re-heated to go with a chicken breast, or can be used as part of the stock for soup.

Do we need a "Tips" section?

bb

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Just for accuracy 1 oz = 28.3 g. Some recipes work with 25g and some with 30g. This may explain why 250g work as cups as it is just less than 9 oz while 200g is just over 7 oz. If you want it precise I suggest you use 225g however I really do not think it matters.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

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ChastMastr
Shipmate
# 716

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Would anyone be interested in my recipe for Roman Chicken? It's not technically my own invention (it is, in fact, from ancient Rome) but it's the one I use and a favourite dish. It's from this cookbook. There is no measurement given, though -- it's along the lines of an ingredient list more than anything else. Here's an example of the way these things are written.

But it seems to work pretty well even though I just put in random amounts of spices (I use a lot, especially since I don't add salt) and one of the ingredients is actually extinct (!). It involves chicken, cumin, prunes or plums, celery seed and a few other things.

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My essays on comics continuity: http://chastmastr.tumblr.com/tagged/continuity

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Apicius is good.

Between him & my Larousse I need never be short of silly recipes.

Though Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book, the best cookery book ever written, is the place for sensible recipies!

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie:
Just for accuracy 1 oz = 28.3 g. Some recipes work with 25g and some with 30g. This may explain why 250g work as cups as it is just less than 9 oz while 200g is just over 7 oz. If you want it precise I suggest you use 225g however I really do not think it matters.

If you are cooking something that requires accuracy to the nearest gram, or even 10 grams, you probably shouldn't be!

My prefered tactic is to add however much you want of whatever you want, mix it till it feels right, then cook it till it smells right.

Which is probably why I find bread easier to cook than pastry, and cakes almost impossible.

But then I've met people who rely on precise measurements & timings and have real hassle with bread, because you can't cook it like that.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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You do have to measure baking soda and baking powder carefully. Otherwise the finished product may be inedible.

Moo

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See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
dsiegmund
Shipmate
# 908

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Chastmastr,
I'm partial to historical recipes, so I'd like to see your Apican chicken recipe. I have a number of recipes dating from the War Between the States and a recipe for teacakes that came in the proverbial covered wagon with my family to Texas.

Posts: 180 | From: Bastrop, Texas | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged



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