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» Ship of Fools   » Ship's Locker   » Limbo   » Heaven: What wine goes with black pudding? (Page 2)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: What wine goes with black pudding?
Sine Nomine*

Ship's backstabbing bastard
# 3631

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quote:
Originally posted by Nonpropheteer:
Before I can consider a woman for a long term relationship, she has to like Swiss Rolls.

So not only are you a devotee of Little Debbie, but a prospective girlfriend must be a devotee also?

That is so friggin' weird, man.

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Grits
Compassionate fundamentalist
# 4169

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That shouldn't be so hard to find. Swiss Rolls are the one Debbie I can't resist. I just can't even buy them. The shape makes them practically inhalable.

I don't like Star Crunch, however. They are right vile.

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Lord, fill my mouth with worthwhile stuff, and shut it when I've said enough. Amen.

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Nonpropheteer
6 Syllable Master
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quote:
Originally posted by Sine Nomine:
So not only are you a devotee of Little Debbie, but a prospective girlfriend must be a devotee also?

That is so friggin' weird, man.

What is weird about? Two consenting adults, with their own common interests getting together. Would you think it was weird if I preferred blondes, or well educated women?

You need to be a little more open minded about things, Sine. No everyone has your antediluvian morality.

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Amazing Grace*

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# 4754

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quote:
Originally posted by Mousethief:
quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
And Mousethief, well then, you're just not a true wine afficianado. It's what *everyone* serves with ice cream. [/winesnobbery]

Sorry. I know for a fact that wine snobs don't serve white zin, or even consider it wine. I've been told often enough by them, trust me on this.
Ackshully, MT, roses are being viewed with more favor by a number of serious (or semi-serious) wine drinkers as a nice summer wine. Some of the Spanish ones are quite highly regarded.

I always love a good blanc de noirs sparkler. One outfit in Temecula (can't remember which) makes quite a nice one. (Pink is my vice.)

I personally prefer a late harvest wine, some liqueur, or a nice cuppa joe ("corrected" or not) with my dessert.

Charlotte

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.sig on vacation

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Nonpropheteer
6 Syllable Master
# 5053

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Has anyone ever tried Ice Wine? I've had some from the Finger Lakes region of NY... pretty good. Apparently its made from grapes that have been allowed to freeze on the vines or mabe just frost damaged, I can't remember.
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Timothy the Obscure

Mostly Friendly
# 292

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Ice wine is made from grapes that have frozen on the vine (or in a few California wineries like Bonny Doon, grapes that have been picked and put in the freezer). If they stay on the vine long enough to freeze (in Germany, anyway), they get very ripe and sweet. When they freeze, the water in the grapes crystallizes and you can crush them and strain out the ice crystals, resulting in a kind of grape juice concentrate that yields an incredibly sweet and luscious wine if the grapes are of good quality to begin with and have the acid backbone to balance the sugar.

Never having tasted black pudding (or having any intention of doing so) I refrain from recommendations. But I suspect that strong, dark beer--and lots of it--would be the way to go. In fact, about three pints before even contemplating the meal would be a good start.

Timothy

[typo]

[ 24. May 2004, 03:07: Message edited by: Timothy the Obscure ]

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When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.
  - C. P. Snow

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boyinthebands
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# 4040

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A native of Georgia, but with Pennsylvania German blood, I know both states' people enjoy unspeakable pig-based breakfast foods some (headcheese, scrapple, liver pudding, spam) equal to, if not worse, than a black pudding, psychologically.

In my trip to England (and Manchester specifically) I vowed ne'er to touch the vile black pudding.

But in a cafe near the Mancunian train station (Victoria) it was served with my cooked breakfast. I was hungry, and didn't relish paying too much for a sandwich on the train down, or in Heathrow after.

So I ate the dread black pudding -- and liked it. A lot. [Yipee]

I'd vote for hot milky tea, but can agree with the Portuguese red. I don't get the Egri bull's blood -- wish I don't think is fruity enough to carry the pudding, though that might be good with savory pork sausages.

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boyinthebands
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But in a cafe near the Mancunian train station: Piccadilly, rather.
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Cod
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quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:

I went hysterical in the supermarket the other week when perusing some Australian wines which had things like, "Goes well with offal," and various other kinds of food that really, wine would be your last consideration - weird things I can't remember, like 'Barbecued bananas' etc. I'm almost certain one of them said Black Pudding. (This was in Tesco's).

Hmm - Lamb's hearts, stuffed with breadcrumbs and sage, wrapped and tied up in streaky bacon and casseroled in red wine goes extremely well with .. more wine.

Sandeman's port is nice. I prefer Graham's Six Grapes. Also, Allesveloren, a South African "port" (shhh.. don't tell the EU that I used the P word) is not only excellent in itself but extremely good for the price. If you can find it.

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Nonpropheteer
6 Syllable Master
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quote:
Originally posted by Sir George Grey.:

Sandeman's port is nice. I prefer Graham's Six Grapes. Also, Allesveloren, a South African "port" ... If you can find it.

Heh. There are two liquor stores in the town I live in now. Only one had porte. The most expensive was $7. The guy had to look for that, because though he had worked there for 2 years, he had never heard of the stuff. I bought it anyway, out of desperation - it tasted like cough syrup. [Projectile]

That's when I realized that living in this town is a punishment from God. [Help]

<Holds up Sign: "Will work for Porte">

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Alaric the Goth
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Tha don't want te be drinkingg wine wi'thy black puddingg. Tha needs summat like Moorhouses' 'Black Cat', or Thwaites's (if tha 'ave t'misfortune te cum fra' Blackburn). Speakingg fer mesen, Ah'd 'ave three or foower pints o' Pendle Witches Brew. But then Ah don't much care fer yon black pudding, tha knows.
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Amos

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Those'd be Bury puddings, I take it, Alarik?

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Eigon
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Nothing less than Bury puddings would do, surely - and mmm, Moorhouses Black Cat. Alarick, I think I'm in love!

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Alaric the Goth
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Oh, aye, 'Bury' puddings, of course.
(What are 'Bury' puddingses, preciouss, we wonderss?)

I am not, you see, from Lancahsire, despite being rather keen on some of their ales.

In love [Hot and Hormonal] with Moorhouses' ales, I hope you mean, Eigon?!

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Eigon
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# 4917

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Ah, Alarick, how you disappoint me [Smile]
I thought everyone knew that the best black puddings in the world come from Bury market, Lancashire, and are sold from a stall with a sign over it saying "Puddings queue here."

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Alaric the Goth
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Well, the only times I have been to Bury have been to sample the delights of the East Lancashire Railway. And it's rather too long, methinks, since I last did that.

I've been to Leigh quite recently, but they aren't (AFAIK) famous for puddings. Or anything else for that matter.

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'Angels and demons dancing in my head,
Lunatics and monsters underneath my bed' ('Totem', Rush)

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jedijudy*

Jedi defender of ship's cats
# 1059

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quote:
Originally posted by Alarik the Goth:
Tha don't want te be drinkingg wine wi'thy black puddingg. Tha needs summat like Moorhouses' 'Black Cat', or Thwaites's (if tha 'ave t'misfortune te cum fra' Blackburn). Speakingg fer mesen, Ah'd 'ave three or foower pints o' Pendle Witches Brew. But then Ah don't much care fer yon black pudding, tha knows.

I love listening to you talk, Alarik! [Overused]

I'm going to Kenwritez to have dinner. It sounds like he serves 42 different wines with a meal.

Thinking of black pudding, there might be some appropriate side dishes. For instance, grits. Maybe cheese grits for a little more body. Or, how about collard greens? With vinegar and hotsauce. Just trying to help! [Big Grin]

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ENFP...do you see a "T" anywhere??? I don't think so.

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
I'm going to Kenwritez to have dinner. It sounds like he serves 42 different wines with a meal.

Thanks! Sadly, no, not *42* different wines.

quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
Thinking of black pudding, there might be some appropriate side dishes. For instance, grits. Maybe cheese grits for a little more body. Or, how about collard greens? With vinegar and hotsauce. Just trying to help! [Big Grin]

Because of the fattiness / density of blood sausage, you'd want a side dish that would be a bit acidic, perhaps somewhat sweet as well, to help cut through all that fat. That lets out grits, rice, potatoes, any kind of starch, really, but the collard greens and hot sauce would go very well, as would any kind of green veg or fresh corn, as in a maque choux. Black eyed peas with tomato, bell pepper, onion and jalapeno would also work well.

Now a zippy fruit salsa or classic tomato salsa or pico de gallo would go well with the sausage, I think.

I would definitely put a vinegar-based salad dressing with the salad; a Greek salad would go well, as would a tomato, red onion and cucumber salad with a vinaigrette.

For a soup course, a simple gazpacho or tomato soup (not a bisque) would complement the sausage.

For dessert, a sorbet or fruit plate would do well. Skip the cheese.

You can get as fancy or as simple as you please.

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Ann

Curious
# 94

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No,

Black Pudding goes with a fried egg (with a solid white and a runny yolk) on toast - or, better yet, fried bread - bacon, lightly fried mushrooms and, possibly, a sausage and baked beans. Have I forgotten anything? Fried tomato. Ketchup or Brown Sauce if you want. The Black Pudding can be replaced with Hoggy Pudding - a White Pudding.

You can call it Full English Breakfast or Heart Attack on a Plate. To be eaten in moderation - about once a year.

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Ann

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Mr. Spouse

Ship's Pedant
# 3353

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Ok, as the person (indirectly) responsible for this thread it's time to say something! [Big Grin]

When I was younger my response to black pudding was pretty much along the lines of our American contributors! [Devil] But that's as much because my mother [and most other housewives in Northern England in the 60s] used to think that everything needed frying to a cinder, as to the taste or contents...

I was intrigued to see that the pudding in question was "Scottish style". Made in Lancashire. Shocking. I have suggested a visit to Bury next time.

And, as for drinks, the conclusion is:
1. Steaming hot tea. (Mmmm)
2. Jedijudy's Bahama Mamas (Yessss)
3. A nice Chilean merlot (well, we had that with our corned beef hash today and think it would work... [Cool] )

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Try to have a thought of your own, thinking is so important. - Blackadder

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Stargazer
Apprentice
# 6828

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What an interesting discussion! Working as I do in a Wines & Spirits dept of a supermarket, I have to agree that if you are sad enough to eat black pudding ( and I have NEVER been that sad!) then a full bodied shiraz ids the way to go. Soppy whites just do not cut the mustard. try something like a 'd'Arenburg Footbolt' or Lehmanns 'Futures Shiraz' . Nothing to decanting, pour the wine into a clean (steralized?) jug, leaving the gunk behind. Rinse out the gunk, pour the wine back in. Easy peasy!
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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by stargazer:
Nothing to decanting, pour the wine into a clean (steralized?) jug, leaving the gunk behind. Rinse out the gunk, pour the wine back in. Easy peasy!

If all you want your decanting to accomplish is removal of sediment, then this method will work well, assuming you're using unfiltered wine, which usually has residue. However, filtered wine, which is the majority of wine sold in the U.S., typically has no residues.

Here's some good advice on decanting and the reasons for it from this site:
quote:

There are two main reasons to decant wine:

The first is to aerate young or tannic wines. Exposing wine to oxygen basically speeds the process of aging. While the wine is in the bottle in your cellar, small levels of oxygen oxidize the tannins, therefore softening the wine slowly over time. Aerating young wines before drinking them tends to soften the wine and release flavors.

The second reason to decant is to separate wine from the sediment or residue in the bottle – usually needed for older red wines. Pour the wine gently into the decanter, holding the decanter at an angle to avoid splashing. Older red wines do not need aeration like younger wines. Pour slowly until just the sediment is left in the bottle. Professional sommeliers often use a candle to illuminate the residue in the dark bottle, and stop pouring before any sediment leaves the bottle.

For a more in-depth examination of decanting, try this site.

I'm not a beer drinker, so I can't recommend any to you, other than I've frequently heard it said there's no such thing as a bad Belgian beer.

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Jehu son of Nimshi
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# 1368

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My Italian uncle was until recently a Chef with his own Italian restaurant in UK. He was so impressed with Black pudding when he "discovered it", that he put it on his menu as a main course item! I would have to check with him how he served it, as I never got to sample it, but I heard it was superb!!! (I am very jealous, as I am a big fan of black pudding. The taste is sublime, IMHO.)

I guess as a main course for dinner, it would definately be fine to serve it with wine (a full bodied red would be my vote)... although I think wine with a full english fried breakfast would be pushing it for me... cuppa tea would win in that setting!


Tiggs

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The shipmate formally known as Tigglet

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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How do you know how long to decant? I mean if you leave a wine out long enough it will turn to vinegar.

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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Well, obviously you stopper the wine before it reaches vinegar! My rule of thumb is 45-60 minutes prior to serving. Once the wine has been decanted and any remainder restoppered, there shouldn't be much need to re-decant it. Once per bottle ought to be sufficient.

You can test the efficacy of decanting for yourself: Open a bottle of red wine at cellar temperature (usually 55-60 degrees F) and decant it and immediately taste it. Note your impressions. Then, taste the decanted wine every 15 minutes until an hour has passed. You'll probably notice a subtle change in the taste and aroma of the wine.

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
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Actually I've done that, Ken, with a bottle of Lemberger and was amazed. Right out of the bottle it was only good to clean sinks. An hour later it was heaven.

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This is the last sig I'll ever write for you...

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Stargazer
Apprentice
# 6828

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It is true that some more tannic wines will benefit from being aerated. When I put such a wine on tasting at work, generally it's opened at least three hours before the tasting table is opened up to the milling throng of guzzlers!

We rarely put Californian wines on tasting 'cos they're 'not customer friendly'. Aussie reds go down well, specially if we offer cheese as well!

There is an art to knowing what the good folk of Lancashire will accept from the table any given weekend. we would not put black pudding on..I think. Perhaps I should suggest it as an alternative to cheese (or strawberries!)

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Cod
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There's no set time - it depends on how long it takes for the bacteria to pitch up.

I've had bottles of wine left open overnight (no - don't ask) and they've been fine in the morning.

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Furry Gherkin
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# 5641

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Nowt wrong wi' black pudding....great traditional food, I really like it...apart from a certain Southern place that tried to serve BP on a bit of MDF....Tha gots to 'ave the reet chunky door-stop sliced bread, then fry it in'th pan affer ya fries the bacon n sausages, so's yon bread soaks up the flavour of the pan...it often comes in thick sausage-shaped links, n tha cuts offa wot tha needs....best served wi' full Engerlish brekkie, being placed on'top offa a door-stop slice, wiv a fried egg on'top...

As for having wine wit' pudding...waste of damn good pudding...!!!

FG... [Paranoid]

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I Think...Therefore I cant Thwim...

In tribute to all at Morecambe Lifeboat Station...

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Amos

Shipmate
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A small prize awaits the person who can identify the most cod-dialects in Furry Gherkin's post. [Axe murder] (as we're in heaven)

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At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
A small prize awaits the person who can identify the most cod-dialects in Furry Gherkin's post. [Axe murder] (as we're in heaven)

If I knew what a cod-dialect is, I could better understand what you're talking about.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Amos

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'Cod' in this sense means ersatz or fake. The folks in Dogpatch speak a cod-Appalachian dialect.

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At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Thanks, Amos.

Moo

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See you later, alligator.

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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I'm pretty hopeless at this as I'm so very not English, but would his accent be Yorkshire? Or Lancashire? (Unless they're the same thing.)

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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quote:
Originally posted by Kenwritez:
I'm pretty hopeless at this as I'm so very not English, but would his accent be Yorkshire? Or Lancashire? (Unless they're the same thing.)

Oh, no. I can't watch.

b.

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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I know there's 4000 holes in Blackburn, Lancashire. Not sure why, though.

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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Someone went mad with a power drill?

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Ian M
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# 79

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I've had black pudding and roasted figs as a starter, in a country house hotel up near Carlisle. Jolly good stuff, and yes, a full-bodied red's definitely what you need.

Ian

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Timothy the Obscure

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# 292

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quote:
A small prize awaits the person who can identify the most cod-dialects in Furry Gherkin's post.
I thought I spotted Yorkshire, Cheshire, and a hint of Scouse--but I'm no Henry Higgins.

Timothy

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When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.
  - C. P. Snow

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ce
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# 1957

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quote:
Originally posted by Ian M:
I've had black pudding and roasted figs as a starter, in a country house hotel up near Carlisle. Jolly good stuff, and yes, a full-bodied red's definitely what you need.

Seems to be a fairly common starter in the Lake District/Cumbria. I can go one further; I was presented with it for breakfast at a hotel in Grasmere ("chef says you'd better have it now as you missed it last night") after agonizing over the starters the previous evening and choosing another dish. Heavenly, plenty of strong tea on that occasion though!
ce

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ce

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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Black pudding: Just Say No. [Projectile]

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Peppone
Marine
# 3855

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I'm wondering what wine would go best with kimchi.

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I looked at the wa's o' Glasgow Cathedral, where vandals and angels painted their names,
I was clutching at straws and wrote your initials, while parish officials were safe in their hames.

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Timothy the Obscure

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# 292

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Alsatian Gewurztraminer. It works with sauerkraut.

Timothy

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When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.
  - C. P. Snow

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ce
Shipmate
# 1957

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quote:
Originally posted by Timothy the Obscure:
Alsatian Gewurztraminer. It works with sauerkraut.Timothy

There's an interesting thought, so should Black Pudding - sort of "Boudin Noir aux Choucroute" - off to the shops methinks!
ce

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ce

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ce
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# 1957

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Damn, someone's already thought of it! Feuilleté aux deux boudins

[ 27. May 2004, 09:20: Message edited by: ce ]

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ce

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Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by basso:
quote:
Originally posted by Kenwritez:
I'm pretty hopeless at this as I'm so very not English, but would his accent be Yorkshire? Or Lancashire? (Unless they're the same thing.)

Oh, no. I can't watch.

b.

Well, it depends which Yorkshire accent and which Lancashire accent.

A Manchester accent and a Middlesborough accent are pretty different - but then, Middlesborough is pretty different from say Leeds. Leeds is different from Sheffield, which has more in common with an East Midlands accent than it does a York one.

Confused? You would be.

Can I observe in passing that the loudest dislike of black pudding is coming from people who've never tried it? I agree the Irish kind (oatmeal and no lumps of fat) is massively better than the English kind (lots of lumps of fat), but it really is quite pleasant.

Haggis is not pleasant. It is considerably better than pleasant. It is completely deserving of its crown as chieftan of the pudding race.

And don't let Alarik fool you. He doesn't talk like that, dee ye at aal, lad?

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Oy Alarik mon! Gan' hyem?

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Amos

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# 44

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No skittles night in the Black Country is complete without an hors d'oeuvre of cold chunks of black pudding interspersed with pickled onions and/or tinned pineapple chunks on a kebab stick.

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At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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I have seen my daughter absent-mindedly eat an entire half-kilo jar of picked onions almost without noticing, then put the jar back on the shelf, half full of slightly cloudy vinegar, without an onion in sight, as if no-one would notice.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Nonpropheteer
6 Syllable Master
# 5053

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quote:
Originally posted by stargazer:
Aussie reds go down well, specially if we offer cheese as well!


LMAO as I recall two Monty Python skits at the same time... Australian Table Wines and Cheese Shop.

quote:
Another good fighting wine is "Melbourne Old-and-Yellow", which is
particularly heavy, and should be used only for hand-to-hand combat.

Quite the reverse is true of "Chateau Chunder", which is an Appelachian
controle, specially grown for those keen on regurgitation -- a fine wine
which really opens up the sluices at both ends.


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