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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: What's strange about the British?
dorcas

Ship's florist
# 4775

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quote:
Originally posted by Ship's Meerkat:
quote:
Originally posted by Chapelhead:
And what about the Senior Service? [Biased]

Sorry, who? Again, pity a poor ignorant little oik.
When Brits say "the navy" they mean The Royal Navy (as opposed to The Merchant Navy) and because the navy was around before the Army or (well, obviously!) the Air Force they are called the Senior Service. (I wouldn't dare call them Senior Citizens though - my brother might read this!)

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"I love large women - they supply warmth in the winter and shade in the summer!" (With thanks to Gort!)

Posts: 387 | From: The Curry Mile, Manchester | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Amos

Shipmate
# 44

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How do you know, Norman? [Ultra confused] They ought to pay you more.

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At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

Posts: 7667 | From: Summerisle | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
The Bede's American Successor

Curmudgeon-in-Training
# 5042

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quote:
Originally posted by Norman the Organ:
Earl Grey tastes like an infusion made from the sweepings of a Guinea Pig hutch [Projectile]

[normal tea, however, I am addicted to [Big Grin] ]

In the US, any tea sold by Lipton's meets the aforementioned infusion definition. It's hard to find a brand-name tea in the US without the Lipton's name, although there are some.

This is why I tended to gravitate to any tea that actually came from Canada (even their cheap stuff) before I realized what the caffiene was doing to my hypoglycemia. Even tea sold in the US with a Canadian brand name (read: Red Rose) is usually worthless. Always buy the stuff in Canada and bring it back with you.

Note to person that was disgusted at using hot tap water for tea:

1. Some people have installed taps on their sinks that distribute 190 degree F (near boiling) water on demand.

2. Even if someone doesn't have one of the aformentioned hot water taps, do you really want to get all the "flavor" from a US tea bag? Think carefully about this before you answer. (I think the only thing Lipton's is good for is to make "sun tea," which does not involve pouring hot water over the tea bags.)

Of course, if you are going to make sweetened iced tea as it is made in some of the southeastern portions of the United States, the sugar kills the taste of all the bad resins. So, Lipton's will work.

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This was the iniquity of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride of wealth and food in plenty, comfort and ease, and yet she never helped the poor and the wretched.

—Ezekiel 16.49

Posts: 6079 | From: The banks of Possession Sound | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by The Bede's American Successor:
Of course, if you are going to make sweetened iced tea as it is made in some of the southeastern portions of the United States, the sugar kills the taste of all the bad resins. So, Lipton's will work.

Sweetened ice tea is, as all right-thinking people know, one of the highest manifestations of God's Perfect Will, especially when extra lemon or lime is added and the whole shebang is served to you in a quart-size Mason jar sweating with condensation by a sweet-voiced Southern waitress who calls you "Hon."

This hot water stuff? Merely God's Permissive Will. God won't actually stop you from pouring hot water onto your tea, but he does raise the eyebrow at it. In evidence, I cite Hesitations 19:19-20: "And lo did the heavenly host suck in their breath and purse their lips when Moses struck the rock with his staff and dribbled the resulting hot water into Aaron's teacup."

[ 06. June 2004, 22:28: Message edited by: Kenwritez ]

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Nonpropheteer
6 Syllable Master
# 5053

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I actually lke Earl Grey tea, if I am drinking hot tea... English Breakfast as wll (assuming that's actually English). But how can someone not like sweet, iced tea? It definately shows the Brits have not fully overcome thier barbarous nature.
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Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Nonpropheteer:
I actually lke Earl Grey tea, if I am drinking hot tea... English Breakfast as wll (assuming that's actually English). But how can someone not like sweet, iced tea? It definately shows the Brits have not fully overcome thier barbarous nature.

I think the reason the British haven't taken to iced tea is that it needs to be sweetened and adding sugar/sweetener to tea is thought of as very wrong. Adjusting this notion for iced tea hasn't caught on.

Just an idea.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
I think the reason the British haven't taken to iced tea is that it needs to be sweetened and adding sugar/sweetener to tea is thought of as very wrong. Adjusting this notion for iced tea hasn't caught on.

I prefer my iced tea unsweetened.

Many years ago when I lived in Belfast, my Irish friends were repelled by the idea of iced tea. They assumed it was like hot tea which had cooled to room temperature. I agree that's not a pleasant beverage.

The best iced tea is definitely sun tea. It has an especially nice flavor.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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quote:
Originally posted by Nonpropheteer:
I actually lke Earl Grey tea, if I am drinking hot tea... English Breakfast as wll (assuming that's actually English). But how can someone not like sweet, iced tea? It definately shows the Brits have not fully overcome thier barbarous nature.

Anyone who needs to add sugar to tea (or milk for that matter) is either a barbarian and outside the pale, or a child who has not learned better.

You drink tea because of the flavour, and when you pollute it with milk or sugar, you kill the flavour. If you don't like the taste of tea, drink hot milk with sugar, or lemonade, or somthing that says what it is honestly.

Tea with sugar -- pah.

John

Posts: 5929 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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quote:
Originally posted by krill:
What I want to know is if yall can type without an accent, why can't yall talk without one [Biased] [Big Grin] [Killing me]

They do.

JOhn

Posts: 5929 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
quote:
Originally posted by Seth:
I'm not sure,Kelly.'Loo' has no gender specificity for me!

There's definitely gender and class connotations for all these things in this country,though..

Also,in my experience,Americans only tend to close toilet doors when they're using them,whilst Brits are a bit more prissy and prefer to keep them closed at all times.Hence we're much keener on locking toilets when using them!

I'm with Jack the Lass - if I heard a bloke refer to the 'loo' I would do a brief doubletake. He's more likely to say gents or bog ... or even toilet!


But as part of general usage, "bog" is new. When I lived in the UK yeah these many years ago (okay, about 30) the only boys who called loos bogs had been at Winchester (a public school), where it was part of the school jargon.

Now I gather it is more widely used. But all my friends (male and female) in the UK still call the smallest rooom the loo, or sometimes the lavatory. Maybe we're just too old and out of date.

John

Posts: 5929 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Amphibalus

Cloak of anonymity
# 5351

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quote:
Originally posted by Nonpropheteer:
I actually lke Earl Grey tea, if I am drinking hot tea... English Breakfast as wll (assuming that's actually English). But how can someone not like sweet, iced tea? It definately shows the Brits have not fully overcome thier barbarous nature.

NP, I personally have no objection to sweet, iced tea, and drank copious quantities of it while on holiday in the South some years ago. I just don't believe that it is really Tea™.

I hope I don't have to remind anyone following this thread that tea does not come in bags (other than the shopping bag in which you carried it home from the store). Tea bags are only used by members of the labouring classes, the indigent poor and students.

Tea is served from a china pot - which has been pre-warmed with boiling hot water (190° is merely lukewarm). The tea leaves are then spooned into the pot, one spoonful per person. ('One for the pot' is a matter of individual preference. Do it if you have to.) The pot is then filled with an appropriate amount of freshly boiled water.

Milk is poured into a china cup*, resting on its saucer, and the tea - having been infused for between one and four minutes depending on the blend - is then poured out. The silver tea strainer which great-grandmama bequeathed you may be employed in this operation if you really must. Milk may be replaced by a thin slice of lemon in the afternoon, but sugar does not even enter into the equation.

As to varieties of leaf, Assam Broken Orange Pekoe (the basis of English Breakfast) is a reasonable choice, or perhaps a Keemun, or Russian Caravan for the afternoon - but there are times when only Gunpowder Green will do.

*The English gentleman is a pre-lactarian. Post-lactarianism is a heresy and an abomination unto the Lord.

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I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand
Walking through the streets of Soho in the rain
He was looking for the place called Lee Ho Fook’s
Going to get a big dish of beef chow mein. (Warren Zevon)

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Saviour Tortoise
Shipmate
# 4660

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quote:
Originally posted by The Bede's American Successor:

Note to person that was disgusted at using hot tap water for tea:

1. Some people have installed taps on their sinks that distribute 190 degree F (near boiling) water on demand.

"Near boiling" - not good enough I'm afraid. Actual boiling water poured into a vessel which has previously been warmed is the only way to make decent tea. [Big Grin]


[Cross posted wich Amphibalus making the same point!]

[ 06. June 2004, 23:51: Message edited by: Saviour Tortoise ]

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Baptised not Lobotomised

Posts: 745 | From: Bath, UK | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
dorcas

Ship's florist
# 4775

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And having drunk your decaff tea, and got to the loo in time, there are further linguistic minefields in which we love to trap Americans....

Are you through? says American (thinking finished)
Through what? says Brit (thinking keyhole)

Purse, pocketbook, chips, jelly, pants, vest, faucet...ooh, lotsa fun!

[Snigger]

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"I love large women - they supply warmth in the winter and shade in the summer!" (With thanks to Gort!)

Posts: 387 | From: The Curry Mile, Manchester | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Peppone
Marine
# 3855

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Many years ago when I lived in Belfast, my Irish friends were repelled by the idea of iced tea. They assumed it was like hot tea which had cooled to room temperature.

That's a popular drink here in the Kong: dong lai cha, ice milk tea, as opposed to dong ling cha, ice lemon tea.

Dong lai cha is made by boiling the tea bags in the kettle for a few minutes, then adding evaporated milk and sugar, and boiling all that for a while*, then cooling the whole thing down and adding ice. Drink with a straw.

Hey, people like it. I have drunk it.

*This, by the way, is how the boys in my Sikh Boys Club in Edinburgh made tea when we went camping; they referred to it as "proper Indian tea".

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I looked at the wa's o' Glasgow Cathedral, where vandals and angels painted their names,
I was clutching at straws and wrote your initials, while parish officials were safe in their hames.

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AngelaSo
Shipmate
# 6699

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The other day I went to Chinatown in Toronto with my friend. We went to a Hong Kong style restaurant for lunch. A Caucasian mother and her son was sitting next to our table. The son told the server he wanted a glass of ice tea. The server spoke working English and didn't know what ice tea is. I looked at my friend. A few second later, my friend spoke up.

Friend (in English): I think it's cold lemon tea that he wants.

The server got my friend's meaning and brought the boy a glass of ice tea later.

Posts: 135 | From: London Canada | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amazing Grace*

Shipmate
# 4754

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quote:
Originally posted by Saviour Tortoise:
quote:
Originally posted by The Bede's American Successor:

Note to person that was disgusted at using hot tap water for tea:

1. Some people have installed taps on their sinks that distribute 190 degree F (near boiling) water on demand.

"Near boiling" - not good enough I'm afraid. Actual boiling water poured into a vessel which has previously been warmed is the only way to make decent tea. [Big Grin]
My office has one of those taps; makes bringing water up to the boil in the microwave for tea a snap.

I'm afraid tea drinkers have a tough row to hoe in a lot of US eateries, though. I'd actually suggest bringing a supply of your favorite in bags.

Charlotte

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.sig on vacation

Posts: 2594 | From: Sittin' by the dock of the [SF] bay | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
AngelaSo
Shipmate
# 6699

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Oh... I've just thought of another one. American tourists beware.... Don't call those thing "fanny bags" when you are travelling in the UK. The word "fanny" has another meaning in Britian. Since this is the Heaven board, I don't think I should be explaining that alternative meaning here.

Angela [Two face]

Posts: 135 | From: London Canada | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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It's even worse, AngelaSo -- we call 'em Fanny PACKS.

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This is the last sig I'll ever write for you...

Posts: 63536 | From: Washington | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
The Bede's American Successor

Curmudgeon-in-Training
# 5042

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quote:
Originally posted by Saviour Tortoise:
quote:
Originally posted by The Bede's American Successor:

Note to person that was disgusted at using hot tap water for tea:

1. Some people have installed taps on their sinks that distribute 190 degree F (near boiling) water on demand.

"Near boiling" - not good enough I'm afraid. Actual boiling water poured into a vessel which has previously been warmed is the only way to make decent tea. [Big Grin]
If you have purchased your loose tea in Vancouver or Victoria, you are right.

You may think twice about flushing all the resins out when in the US if all you have is Lipton's tea bags or tea bags purchased at Costco that have been sitting on your shelf for 3 months because the quantity in the package.

Makes sun iced tea sound all the better, doesn't it?

--------------------
This was the iniquity of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride of wealth and food in plenty, comfort and ease, and yet she never helped the poor and the wretched.

—Ezekiel 16.49

Posts: 6079 | From: The banks of Possession Sound | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Ronist
Shipmate
# 5343

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We had been aprised of this strange British Tera Ceremony before the arrival of family from Cornwall. Now the Cornish are not English as they will tell you, but they are British. They asked for coffee. We fell right over.

Most of my relatives are British by heritage so most of this is old hat, but I have never heard the word pants used like Baby Bear does.

quote:
Kenwritez, they are talking a pile of pants.
Truly it is a different language.
Posts: 827 | From: Vancouver Canada | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Neep
Ship's Meerkat
# 5213

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quote:
Originally posted by Amphibalus:
NP, I personally have no objection to sweet, iced tea, and drank copious quantities of it while on holiday in the South some years ago. I just don't believe that it is really Tea™.

I hope I don't have to remind anyone following this thread that tea does not come in bags (other than the shopping bag in which you carried it home from the store). Tea bags are only used by members of the labouring classes, the indigent poor and students.

Tea is served from a china pot - which has been pre-warmed with boiling hot water (190° is merely lukewarm). The tea leaves are then spooned into the pot, one spoonful per person. ('One for the pot' is a matter of individual preference. Do it if you have to.) The pot is then filled with an appropriate amount of freshly boiled water.

Milk is poured into a china cup*, resting on its saucer, and the tea - having been infused for between one and four minutes depending on the blend - is then poured out. The silver tea strainer which great-grandmama bequeathed you may be employed in this operation if you really must. Milk may be replaced by a thin slice of lemon in the afternoon, but sugar does not even enter into the equation.

As to varieties of leaf, Assam Broken Orange Pekoe (the basis of English Breakfast) is a reasonable choice, or perhaps a Keemun, or Russian Caravan for the afternoon - but there are times when only Gunpowder Green will do.

*The English gentleman is a pre-lactarian. Post-lactarianism is a heresy and an abomination unto the Lord.

Branching from a discussion in hell about whether chronicles of a certain pre-pubescent wizardly fellow constitute good books, and based on CS Lewis' idea that a good book is one that you enjoy...

Can we not define a good cup of tea as one that the person drinking it enjoys? And therefore subjective?

Perhaps not- my opinion on this may be worthless, as I'm a student and I use teabags.

[Snigger]

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"Your standing days are done," I cried, "You'll rally me no more!
I don't even know which side we fought on, or what for."

Posts: 293 | From: A burrow, in England | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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quote:
Originally posted by Ship's Meerkat:
Sorry, who? Again, pity a poor ignorant little oik.

The Royal Navy.

Tha RAF hardly count for anything, being just soldiers who've grown wings. The RAF are also a bit 'technical' and go against the British grain of wanting to be seen as incompetent at anything clever or important. [Biased]

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!

Posts: 7082 | From: Turbolift Control. | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gill H

Shipmate
# 68

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Going back to the 'why do you hate tourists' thing:

As has been said, it's only the stereotype tourist we hate. And they exist in every culture. Stereotype Brits abroad are a hundred times worse (particularly the lager louts).

On our first visit to Paris we met an English family who complained loudly and frequently because everything wasn't written up in English everywhere. They didn't see why they should learn any French, and obviously thought the French were doing it just to spite them.

We referred to them forever after as 'Duggie and Jeanette' (from Shirley Valentine).

I've often had conversations with US visitors on the tube, because I use a tube line which goes to several of the big tourist hotspots. But then, coming from Wales, I'm used to hearing the life story and medical history of the stranger next to me on public transport.

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*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

Posts: 9313 | From: London | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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What no-one has told you here and is largely forgotten is the English have a working class tea, certainly in the North of England. It is normally made much the way Peppone describes Cold milk tea but is drunk hot. With the added ingredient that if it is not drunk immediately the tea is left on the heat to keep warm and tea and water added as required. The elements that have been used to maket it with include buckets and broom handles. It is always drunk very sweet and probably with lots of milk out of tin mugs. You are unlikely to be offered it anywhere today but it was still around twenty years ago. I a well run working class home there was always a pot on.

Today the tea-bag in the mug is the nearest equivalent.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Raspberry Rabbit

Will preach for food
# 3080

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We're having a pub quiz in our church hall on Saturday night (we turn our little church hall into a pub (wine and beer only) rather than piling into the local pub. Sundry church members (the clever ones) are asked to compose some questions and send them in to our social convenor. Just think of the game Trivial Pursuit played in the presence of alcohol.....

Raspberry Rabbit
Penicuik, Midlothian

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...naked pirates not respecting boundaries...
(((BLOG)))

Posts: 2215 | From: In the middle of France | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
MiceElf

Not your average mouse
# 4389

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Im sorry, but someone has got to mention this...
THE BIRDIE SONG! [Roll Eyes]

It really is too awful to describe... please please stay sober. [Big Grin]

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What do we want.... Cure for Obesity
When do we want it.... After Dessert.

Posts: 1032 | From: OILOVWOIGHT | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
PointlessAlbatross
Shipmate
# 4998

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Further to the car-washing comments. We don't have car washes with a plethora of people awaiting to polish and wax your car afterwards ( at least I have never seen one). We do have garages (another wonderful word that either means the covered lockable place where you store your car OR the petrol station OR the place where you get your car fixed) that have automatic car washes. I think they are a low grade version of the ones in the US, and with no additional personnel. Alternatively you can subscribe to the aforementioned carwashing ritual using half a dozen sponges (they must be bright yellow) and innumerable leather cloths for polishing and drying although this is not just a UK thing. It was commonplace in Germany as well. Note that the trend towards lavishing attention on your car does tend to fall off the further north you go as people learn that it will inevitably rain just after you have finished. The final option is to just leave the car as nature intended, although this invariably attracts the attentions of people who write in the dirt such classic comments as "Also available in white" especially on white cars.

I'm not as open as babybear it seems and always feel vaguely uncomfortable about starting a conversation with folk on public transport. Just look at UK mystery worshipper reports to see that it is a common problem even with the best will in the world. However I have adopted the approach that talking to apparent 'foreigners' is a safe bet. After all you have a whole gamut of questions to ask people about where they are from and what they are going to do. And you never know, you might even be able to give them some useful information and maybe help leave them with the impression that we aren't such a bad little country.

We do tend towards the one-answer-fits-all approach to questions about ourselves though. If anyone asks how we are you'll generally get an "alright", "not so bad", "could be better". People really don't do "I'm fantastic, thanks for asking", at least if someone does do that most people will try to sidle away very quickly. You can have just been in a hideous accident with a silage spreader and had one arm ripped off but you'll still say "could be better". I imagine most people do have a few friends that they'll actually tell the truth to, but you'll know if you are one of the selected few.

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For God so loved the world he didn't send a committee

Posts: 167 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
Quidnunk
Shipmate
# 2901

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quote:
I think the reason the British haven't taken to iced tea is that it needs to be sweetened and adding sugar/sweetener to tea is thought of as very wrong. Adjusting this notion for iced tea hasn't caught on.

Just an idea.

I used to think that, then I moved North - now when making tea I ask 'How many sugars' rather than 'Do you take sugar' to avoid strange looks.

Also - I never thought loo was gender specific, but as 'toilet' is an acceptable word and most pubs, eateries etc will use it to indicate where the rooms are it seems to make sense to say 'toilet' when looking for one!

I talk to people on trains and in queues but not on buses. Don't know what that means!

[quote fixed]

[ 07. June 2004, 11:43: Message edited by: Stoo ]

Posts: 152 | From: Nam | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Ronist:
Most of my relatives are British by heritage so most of this is old hat, but I have never heard the word pants used like Baby Bear does.

quote:
Kenwritez, they are talking a pile of pants.
Truly it is a different language.
The first thing I learned when I joined the ship was never say pants, always trousers.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Marvin the Martian

Interplanetary
# 4360

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Ronist:
Most of my relatives are British by heritage so most of this is old hat, but I have never heard the word pants used like Baby Bear does.

quote:
Kenwritez, they are talking a pile of pants.
Truly it is a different language.
The first thing I learned when I joined the ship was never say pants, always trousers.

Moo

Quite right. "Pants" in UK english is short for "underpants".

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Hail Gallaxhar

Posts: 30100 | From: Adrift on a sea of surreality | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Oxymoron
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# 5246

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Tea should be made with extra strong tea bags (M&S do very good ones) and boil ing water, after about ten minutes (maybe more) you then add enough milk to make it cool enough to down in one, and enough more sugar than will happily dissolve. After a few of these the mug will turn a pleasant shade of brown and help infuse the brew with the correct flavour.
Posts: 179 | From: Brunel's Kingdom | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
GeordieDownSouth
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# 4100

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I've got to jump in here and highlight something that has been implied. There are in fact two countries in England. This is before getting into the common explanation of the relationship between England, the UK, Great Britain, the British Isles and why its not a good idea to describe Wales as "being in England."

But back to the main point. In England there is the North, and the South. Actually that's not really it. There's London/infected by London South East, and the rest of England. However, I shall revert to my native parlance and refer to this Capital centric South East as "The South." Its a long way to cornwall so we're not really aware of it.

The North and the South have subtely different cultures, which even confuses the English. Actually, one of the biggest problems is the denizens of the "South" think of themselves as "English" and assume the rest of the country is exactly the same. Now, these "Southerners" may be perfectly nice people, but are unfortuntaley deluded.

"Up North" people will tell you directly things like your jumper is cr*p (this caught me out when I went home after a stint at uni) and that their left testicle is hurting when you ask how they are. There is a little bit of a myth that they are friendlier, which is almost true. I've actually found that Southeners are just as friendly, but are much less inclined to violate your privacy. This can seem a bit stand offish. but there you go.

One interesting aspect of Geordie culture (for those across the pond, the area along the river Tyne mostly made of Newcastle and Gateshead in the North East of england) is that Geordie's tend to be instantly friendly and welcoming and funny, but don't tend to invite you round for meals much if you're not family. In the North West however, this seems to be more common.

Mammoth post, designed to confuse. Happy to contribute more to the internal regional debate, but that's probably another thread.

For the record, I was born a Geordie and lived there till I was 19, my Mum is from Sheffield (hence "mum" rather than "mam") and my Dad is from Essex.

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No longer down south.

Posts: 689 | From: Birmingham | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Ferijen
Shipmate
# 4719

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quote:
Originally posted by Marvin the Martian:
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Ronist:
Most of my relatives are British by heritage so most of this is old hat, but I have never heard the word pants used like Baby Bear does.

quote:
Kenwritez, they are talking a pile of pants.
Truly it is a different language.
The first thing I learned when I joined the ship was never say pants, always trousers.

Moo

Quite right. "Pants" in UK english is short for "underpants".
Not in East Lancashire they're not. There pants are trousers too. And plimsolls are pumps (not daps as I'd been taught in the SW).

But then again, East Lancashire is a whole new country altogether...

Posts: 3259 | From: UK | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
chive

Ship's nude
# 208

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quote:
Originally posted by Ferinjen:

And plimsolls are pumps

I think you may find they're sandshoes but that may be a Scottish thing.

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'Edward was the kind of man who thought there was no such thing as a lesbian, just a woman who hadn't done one-to-one Bible study with him.' Catherine Fox, Love to the Lost

Posts: 3542 | From: the cupboard under the stairs | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Alaric the Goth
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# 511

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Plimsolls are 'sandshoes' wheor they taalk proper, like.

GDS, Ah'm appalled. Yer Mam's a Tyke, and yer Da, why there's nee way Ah'd gan roond admittin' he's from Essex. Doon sooth indeed.

Both me folks are Sun'land born and bred (well me Mam's folks were from near Spennymoor).

And we allus said 'bog' for 'toilet', unless we meant 'netty' (Ah had a lad in me class who still had an ootside netty).

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'Angels and demons dancing in my head,
Lunatics and monsters underneath my bed' ('Totem', Rush)

Posts: 3322 | From: West Thriding | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mrs Badcrumble
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# 5839

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plimsolls are pumps, a dummy is a dit, an under stairs cupboard is a sbenj, the covered walkway between two houses in a terrace is a jennel and pants means that something is rubbish, as in 'kittykat is talking a load of pants'. Glad I could clear this up! [Biased]

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Note to self, Religion - Scary...

Posts: 286 | From: Wrexham, North Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
dorcas

Ship's florist
# 4775

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quote:
Originally posted by Oxymoron:
Tea should be made with extra strong tea bags (M&S do very good ones) and boil ing water, after about ten minutes (maybe more) you then add enough milk to make it cool enough to down in one, and enough more sugar than will happily dissolve. After a few of these the mug will turn a pleasant shade of brown and help infuse the brew with the correct flavour.

Being a civil servant (public servant in US?) I am therefore an expert in tea, and can confirm that the pleasant shade of brown is essential - for reasons of hygiene I do wash my work mug occasionally, but something of the flavour is always lost [Frown]

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"I love large women - they supply warmth in the winter and shade in the summer!" (With thanks to Gort!)

Posts: 387 | From: The Curry Mile, Manchester | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
GeordieDownSouth
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# 4100

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quote:
Originally posted by Alarik the Goth:
<snip>

Both me folks are Sun'land born and bred (well me Mam's folks were from near Spennymoor).

<snip>

I believe you just surrended your right to reply by that admission [Razz]

And I spent the worst year of my life living in Spennymoor.

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No longer down south.

Posts: 689 | From: Birmingham | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
GreyFace
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# 4682

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I like your summary of the North-South divide, GDS. But what's wrong with Spennymoor? It's ideally located - you can reach civilisation by driving ten minutes in any direction.
Posts: 5748 | From: North East England | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Alaric the Goth
Shipmate
# 511

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[Hot and Hormonal] I've just looked at a map on the 'net and Spennymoor is a bit misleading - my Nana's birthplace was south-west of Bishop Auckland and Spennymoor's north-east of it.

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'Angels and demons dancing in my head,
Lunatics and monsters underneath my bed' ('Totem', Rush)

Posts: 3322 | From: West Thriding | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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Kittykat - we said "ginnel", with a hard "g" in Lancashire. Where does jennel come from? We also had the saying "he couldn't stop a pig in a ginnel" meaning someone who was bow-legged.

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Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

Posts: 3710 | From: Hay-on-Wye, town of books | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Ferijen
Shipmate
# 4719

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quote:
Originally posted by Alarik the Goth:
[Hot and Hormonal] I've just looked at a map on the 'net and Spennymoor is a bit misleading - my Nana's birthplace was south-west of Bishop Auckland and Spennymoor's north-east of it.

That's Ok, you've managed to get rid of the Spennymoor connection. Keep it that way. South West of Bishop takes you to Barnard Castle, doesn't it?
Posts: 3259 | From: UK | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
GeordieDownSouth
Shipmate
# 4100

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quote:
Originally posted by GreyFace:
I like your summary of the North-South divide, GDS. But what's wrong with Spennymoor? It's ideally located - you can reach civilisation by driving ten minutes in any direction.

I didn't have a car.

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No longer down south.

Posts: 689 | From: Birmingham | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cartmel Veteran
Shipmate
# 7049

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One thing I've noticed from a few friends from the US is that those of them that have never gone further north than Watford have a very different view of the country from those that have ventured away from Old London Town (TM Disney).

It's certainly my own experience that drivers are more selfish down south, people are less likely to talk to each other on public transport, and the first question on a London pub quiz is "what are you lookin' at?" I know it's a gross generalisation, but I can only go on my own experience.

I have more than one friend from the US who has visited us here in Mancunia, taken in the Pennines, the lake district and been rather shocked that any of it existed - because if you read any Clancy, Watched US movies - the impression one often gets is that England is just London with some green bits around the edges.

The other thing that people visiting the country don't realise, is the real variety here - how accents vary over such a short distance. If you travel from Stockport northwards through Manchester to Oldham, in the distance of ten miles or so you will hear so many different accents.

Not sure what point I'm trying to make, the heat is making my head go funny [Smile]

Posts: 1041 | From: Dorset | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cartmel Veteran
Shipmate
# 7049

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Heck missed the 2 minute deadline.

Was going to add. I had a great friend at Uni from Colorado. After she'd spent a year with us all in Lancaster drinking Guinness, Theakstons and Irish Whiskey - watching football on the telly, and learning all the right swearwords - she went travelling around Europe.

Every letter and postcard she sent back to me usually had some dig or moan about all the annoying American tourists about the place. [Smile]

One missive even described the weather in Vienna as being "a bit nesh". Our work was complete!

Posts: 1041 | From: Dorset | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
Bede: only girls go to the "loo". You need to ask for "the gents".

Seriously?
Semi-seriously. "loo" is posh & girly

I'd say "gents" in a public place, "toilet" or just possibly "lavatory" in someone's house, "bog" with friends of my own age.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mrs Badcrumble
Shipmate
# 5839

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quote:
Eigon wrote: Kittykat - we said "ginnel", with a hard "g" in Lancashire. Where does jennel come from? We also had the saying "he couldn't stop a pig in a ginnel" meaning someone who was bow-legged.

my boyfriend says 'jennel' he's from Derbyshire. maybe it's just a corruption or something?

we also have the pig saying but we use 'alley' instead of ginnel.

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Note to self, Religion - Scary...

Posts: 286 | From: Wrexham, North Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Qlib:
We do herb teas in most places in Britain. Fruit, peppermint or camomile.

Q: Why do anarchists drink herb "tea"?

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A: Because proper tea is theft!


quote:
(Avoid 'caffs', as opposed to cafes, if you can tell the difference?) Have fun.
I can tell the difference but I would put the advice the other way round.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by GeordieDownSouth:
I spent the worst year of my life living in Spennymoor.

I spent a reasonably pleasant lunchtime there once.

I spent a reasonably pleasant 6 months in Littletown which is between Sherburn Hill and Pittington...

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Ferinjen:
South West of Bishop takes you to Barnard Castle, doesn't it?

I've never heard it called that before.

"Auckland", leaving off the episcopal part, yes. But not "Bishop". The place is called Auckland. Which Auckland? No, not the one in New Zealand - the one where the Bishop lives.

Simple really.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged



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