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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: What's strange about the British?
Margaret

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Walsall Illuminations are a form of folk art, as I once tried to explain to a bewildered Dutch couple... [Ultra confused]
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Crotalus
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I'm told the new Walsall art gallery is good, but I've never been able to get in. It's always closed on Mondays. Just like the old Soviet Union.
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QLib

Bad Example
# 43

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quote:
Originally posted by Papa_Smurf:
quote:
Originally posted by Saviour Tortoise:
I always liked the rugby / football comparison which goes "rubgy is a hooligan's game played by gentleman and football is a gentleman's game played by hooligans."

I always thought the comparison was
Rugby : Played by Hooligans, watched by Gentlemen
Football : Played by Gentlemen, watched by Hooligans

I think Saviour Tortoise has the original version correct. As this is Heaven, I think I'll abstain from commenting on the accuracy of the observation.

--------------------
Tradition is the handing down of the flame, not the worship of the ashes Gustav Mahler.

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by Qlib:
quote:
Originally posted by Papa_Smurf:
quote:
Originally posted by Saviour Tortoise:
I always liked the rugby / football comparison which goes "rubgy is a hooligan's game played by gentleman and football is a gentleman's game played by hooligans."

I always thought the comparison was
Rugby : Played by Hooligans, watched by Gentlemen
Football : Played by Gentlemen, watched by Hooligans

I think Saviour Tortoise has the original version correct. As this is Heaven, I think I'll abstain from commenting on the accuracy of the observation.
Or the extension for Gaelic Football, namely that Gaelic Football is a game for Hooligans, played by Hooligans.

Well, Roy Keane (football) and Mick Galwey (Rugby) both played it, and they are shall we say "vigorous".

--------------------
"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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starrina
The rose warrior
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quote:
Originally posted by Papio.:
But you have to admit that Yorkshire folk have a special knack with understatement and lack of enthusiasm?

I do?? [Eek!] [Eek!]

Are you sure it was Yorkshire you went to?

[ 09. June 2004, 17:47: Message edited by: starrina ]

--------------------
"what have you been doing while Bells has been maturing?"
"Drinking better whiskey."

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Gremlin
Ship's Cryptanalyst
# 129

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quote:
Originally posted by Crotalus:
I'm told the new Walsall art gallery is good, but I've never been able to get in. It's always closed on Mondays. Just like the old Soviet Union.

Ah! So that's why my Dad always had Mondays off from work, and worked on Saturdays instead [Big Grin]

Mind you, I didn't notice Mondays as being any more 'closed' than any other day in Moscow, Leningrad or Tbilisi when I visited them in August 1986.

Gremlin

p.s. the real reason was that he worked in a department store that was open on Saturdays (for obvious reasons) and shut on Mondays (so that the staff would have a two-day weekend, as was common at the time). Of course, they've long since abandoned 'closed on Mondays' in favour of seven day trading like everyone else, although my Dad did stick to Mondays as his day off for many years after the change.

--------------------
Too many freaks, not enough circuses.
Ahhh...I see the screw-up fairy has visited us again...
Oh I get it... like humour... but different.

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The Bede's American Successor

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quote:
Originally posted by Saviour Tortoise:
I'm afraid you chain is being yanked. The Tetley's refered to by Amos is a rather exceptional Bitter brewed in God's Own Country, (or Yorkshire as it is sometimes known.) Exceptional when bought in a pub in Yorkshire, anyway. It does not travel well, IMHO, so when for sale in a pub outside of the environs of that fair county, and particularly when being despensed from one fo those nasty electric pumps, it should not be touched with a ten foot barge pole.

I know of a place in Vancouver, BC, that sells the alcoholic Tetley product. Interestingly enough, it is in the law courts complex in downtown Vancouver. I'm sure the bitter is for the tourists, not those folks I see walking around wearing the funny outfits, at least at lunch.

Then again, this establishment is in Canada. After all, if Jesus had been Canadian, the elements at communion would have been poutine and beer.

(Yes, RooK, I know that poutine is not popular in your home province. Still, Burger King sells it.)

--------------------
This was the iniquity of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride of wealth and food in plenty, comfort and ease, and yet she never helped the poor and the wretched.

—Ezekiel 16.49

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Amos

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British and American people: this last statement by Bede is very difficult to credit.

--------------------
At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

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AngelaSo
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# 6699

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quote:
Originally posted by The Bede's American Successor:

Then again, this establishment is in Canada. After all, if Jesus had been Canadian, the elements at communion would have been poutine and beer.

[Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me]

But I don't eat poutine daily.... and I don't think every Canadian eats poutine daily either. I think the Canadian Jesus would choose bread over poutine too - unless the last supper were to take place in a restaurant in a Quebec small town.

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Ariel
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# 58

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I had to look this one up.

quote:
Poutine is a French-Canadian concoction comprised of french fries, gravy, and cheese curds.
Is this true??
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boyinthebands
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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I had to look this one up.

quote:
Poutine is a French-Canadian concoction comprised of french fries, gravy, and cheese curds.
Is this true??
Yes. I ate punds of the stuff when I was in Quebec. Call me sick but I was daydreaming of poutine today. It must be that diet, because I'm certainly not Canadian.
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KenWritez
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Jesus' breakfast would have been "poutine"? Ah, silly me. I had misread it as "poontang."

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Ronist
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Silly you indeed. Who was talking about breakfast?

I've heard of poutine. I've never actually eaten it. I think it is pretty much French Canadian.

Jewish Canadians? Wouldn't really know.

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adsarf
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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
quote:
Originally posted by Ferinjen:
South West of Bishop takes you to Barnard Castle, doesn't it?

I've never heard it called that before.

"Auckland", leaving off the episcopal part, yes. But not "Bishop". The place is called Auckland. Which Auckland? No, not the one in New Zealand - the one where the Bishop lives.

Simple really.

My mother is from Bishop and calls it Bishop. No-one would confuse it with Auckland in New Zealand, but St Helen Auckland is just down the road from Bishop Auckland, hence 'Bishop' rather than 'Auckland'.
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John Holding

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I had to look this one up.

quote:
Poutine is a French-Canadian concoction comprised of french fries, gravy, and cheese curds.
Is this true??
Sort of. You put fresh curds on top of hot chips and then pour hot gravy over the lot. Then head directly to the emergency ward at the local hospital to have your heart de-clogged.

It was invented about 30 years ago in Quebec, but has unfortunately spread to large swaths of Ontario and perhaps other parts of the country. I am told one can find BBQ poutine (BBQ sauce instead of gravy) Mexican (salsa instead of gravy) and a number of other variations, each more horrible than the last.

Now for a truly excellent, original and still local (to the Ottawa Valley) Canadian treat, let me introduce you to the beavertail -- available in several sweet or savory versions. Also a quick ticket to an emergency ward.

John

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
"Auckland", leaving off the episcopal part, yes. But not "Bishop". The place is called Auckland. Which Auckland? No, not the one in New Zealand - the one where the Bishop lives.

Simple really.

I've seen this phrase and its like - "simple really" or "all very simple" on these boards a kazillion times, almost always in posts by Brits, and I haven't been able to figure out just how condescending it's supposed to sound. Does the level of condescension depend on context? Is it only jokingly condescending?
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Amphibalus

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I had to look this one up.

quote:
Poutine is a French-Canadian concoction comprised of french fries, gravy, and cheese curds.
Is this true??
Sounds like a Canadian equivalent of the 'suicide sarnie' - a 1,000-calorie deep-fried chocolate sandwich, popular in Scotland, made of two slices of white bread enclosing a Cadbury Dairy Milk Bar, all covered with a thick batter and then deep fried.

With a deep-fried Mars bar for pudding. [Paranoid]

--------------------
I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand
Walking through the streets of Soho in the rain
He was looking for the place called Lee Ho Fook’s
Going to get a big dish of beef chow mein. (Warren Zevon)

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Pegasus*
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# 5779

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I think it's often used to indicate that something isn't simple at all. Well, that's how I'd use it anyway.

[Sorry, cross posted, I was replying to RuthW]

[ 10. June 2004, 14:52: Message edited by: Glass Angel ]

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Ormo
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# 4805

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quote:
Originally posted by Amphibalus:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I had to look this one up.

quote:
Poutine is a French-Canadian concoction comprised of french fries, gravy, and cheese curds.
Is this true??
Sounds like a Canadian equivalent of the 'suicide sarnie' - a 1,000-calorie deep-fried chocolate sandwich, popular in Scotland, made of two slices of white bread enclosing a Cadbury Dairy Milk Bar, all covered with a thick batter and then deep fried.

With a deep-fried Mars bar for pudding. [Paranoid]

I think it sounds like a cheesy chip with gravy...
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Amphibalus

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quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
I've seen this phrase and its like - "simple really" or "all very simple" on these boards a kazillion times, almost always in posts by Brits, and I haven't been able to figure out just how condescending it's supposed to sound. Does the level of condescension depend on context? Is it only jokingly condescending?

Ruth,
The phrase is usually appended to the explanation of some relatively obscure fact which is self-evident to those privileged to be 'in the know', but totally incomprehensible to anyone not wearing an anorak. It is a minor weapon in the armoury of The British Sense of Humour™.

Simple, really. [Razz]

--------------------
I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand
Walking through the streets of Soho in the rain
He was looking for the place called Lee Ho Fook’s
Going to get a big dish of beef chow mein. (Warren Zevon)

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Amphibalus

Cloak of anonymity
# 5351

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Whoops. So many cross posts here it feels like Clapham Junction in the rush hour.

--------------------
I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand
Walking through the streets of Soho in the rain
He was looking for the place called Lee Ho Fook’s
Going to get a big dish of beef chow mein. (Warren Zevon)

Posts: 1471 | From: Home of Ronnie Radford's boot | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Rat
Ship's Rat
# 3373

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quote:
Originally posted by Glass Angel:
I think it's often used to indicate that something isn't simple at all. Well, that's how I'd use it anyway.

Yes, it is sarcastic and slightly self-deprecatory, and implies the issue is actually very complicated indeed.

How interesting that it sounds patronising to US ears. No wonder all my American friends hate me [Biased]

--------------------
It's a matter of food and available blood. If motherhood is sacred, put your money where your mouth is. Only then can you expect the coming down to the wrecked & shimmering earth of that miracle you sing about. [Margaret Atwood]

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Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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"Simple really" is not, I don't think, intended as condescending, so it is interesting, as Rat has said, that it sounds so.

I can see that I might use it in the context, say, of explaining to someone how to get from A to B on the tube. It would carry the implication that the task was quite possible, as long as you follow the instructions to the letter, and nothing untoward happens.

There is the sense that this is perfectly clear and obvious ( and most importantly unambiguous ) when you are a local, but utterly illogical if you are not. So there is an acceptance of the apparent obtuseness inherent in the issue under discussion. ( and if that sentence doesn't belong in Purgatory, I don't know what does ).

Amphibalous - suicide sarnie - SEND ME A DOZEN! They sound fantastic.

[ 10. June 2004, 15:37: Message edited by: Schroedinger's cat ]

--------------------
Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

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Ferijen
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# 4719

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quote:
Originally posted by adsarf:
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
quote:
Originally posted by Ferinjen:
South West of Bishop takes you to Barnard Castle, doesn't it?

I've never heard it called that before.

"Auckland", leaving off the episcopal part, yes. But not "Bishop". The place is called Auckland. Which Auckland? No, not the one in New Zealand - the one where the Bishop lives.

Simple really.

My mother is from Bishop and calls it Bishop. No-one would confuse it with Auckland in New Zealand, but St Helen Auckland is just down the road from Bishop Auckland, hence 'Bishop' rather than 'Auckland'.
I've always known it as Bishop from people who've lived there and thereabouts. Never Auckland - there's West Auckland in the vicinity too, so why would anyone call it that?

[ETA: what a waste of devilish post 666]

[ 10. June 2004, 15:46: Message edited by: Ferinjen ]

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Lady R of Ashwood
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# 4788

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'How interesting' is also a term of derision, Rat.

Not sure how British this one is, but if you are on the recieving end of the phrase then you have either:
a. proudly presented them with a plate of inedible vileness
b. talked about something that fails to fall into the remit of approved subjects of conversation (the weather, the rail service, illness/death, soap operas (although obviously only the regionally approved one)).
c. said something more intelligent and witty than they could hope of producing.

Any of these will precipitate use of the phrase 'How interesting', probably followed by the phrase 'You must excuse me I have to... (speak to x/go to x/throw myself off x)

Of course, this may not be a Brit thing, just a universal term of derision. But it is nevertheless best done in a 'To The Manor Born' voice!

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Amphibalus

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quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:
...suicide sarnie - SEND ME A DOZEN! They sound fantastic.

The advice to anyone intending to indulge in the aforementioned treat is that you telephone the emergency services before you go into the chippie - then at least you know that, as you have your heart attack, the ambulance is already on its way.

--------------------
I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand
Walking through the streets of Soho in the rain
He was looking for the place called Lee Ho Fook’s
Going to get a big dish of beef chow mein. (Warren Zevon)

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The Bede's American Successor

Curmudgeon-in-Training
# 5042

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I had to look this one up.

quote:
Poutine is a French-Canadian concoction comprised of french fries, gravy, and cheese curds.
Is this true??
Isn't it named after a now-former Prime Minister of Canada?

--------------------
This was the iniquity of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride of wealth and food in plenty, comfort and ease, and yet she never helped the poor and the wretched.

—Ezekiel 16.49

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The Bede's American Successor

Curmudgeon-in-Training
# 5042

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quote:
Originally posted by Amphibalus:
The advice to anyone intending to indulge in the aforementioned treat is that you telephone the emergency services before you go into the chippie - then at least you know that, as you have your heart attack, the ambulance is already on its way.

Upon looking up the definition of "chippie," I see it means:

quote:
chip·py or chip·pie n. pl. chip·pies

1. A chipping sparrow.
2. Slang. A woman prostitute.

So, "...you go into the chippie..."? Do we want to know more about this treat? After all, this is a Christian website.

--------------------
This was the iniquity of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride of wealth and food in plenty, comfort and ease, and yet she never helped the poor and the wretched.

—Ezekiel 16.49

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Ariel
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# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by The Bede's American Successor:
Upon looking up the definition of "chippie," I see it means...

You look up a British colloquialism in an American dictionary, and wonder why it doesn't make sense.

quote:
chip shop. noun {C} (INFORMAL chippy) UK. a shop that sells fried fish, potatoes and other foods, which you take away to eat.
Such as pickled onions and eggs, saveloys, baked beans and battered sausages. With or without curry sauce.
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Amphibalus

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
chip shop. noun {C} (INFORMAL chippy) UK. a shop that sells fried fish, potatoes and other foods, which you take away to eat.
Such as pickled onions and eggs, saveloys, baked beans and battered sausages. With or without curry sauce.
And then there's the meat pies (never specifying what meat), faggots, chunks of lukewarm chicken that have been sat in the hot cabinet for...er...too long, not to mention the mushy peas...

--------------------
I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand
Walking through the streets of Soho in the rain
He was looking for the place called Lee Ho Fook’s
Going to get a big dish of beef chow mein. (Warren Zevon)

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Ariel
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# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Amphibalus:
And then there's the meat pies (never specifying what meat)

Would they be "pukka pies" or is that something else?

[ 10. June 2004, 19:31: Message edited by: Ariel ]

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smatt
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# 103

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Such as pickled onions and eggs, saveloys, baked beans and battered sausages. With or without curry sauce.

and to pick up on the regional variations theme again, mushy peas and gravy (both available, nay fundamental, to any chip shop menu in certain parts [Big Grin] )

smatt

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QLib

Bad Example
# 43

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'Chippy' is as Ariel explained. 'Chippie' in UK English is usually a carpenter. So.... Oh no, as this is Heaven, I'd better not. [Biased]

--------------------
Tradition is the handing down of the flame, not the worship of the ashes Gustav Mahler.

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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Yes, to properly understand what it means to be British, you really ought to know about Fish & Chip shops.

These are prolific big time in Britain. Like there will be one in most small shopping parades in the suburbs (a shopping parade is a row of shops, without dedicated parling facilities, along a street that is otherwise residential - do you get those in the states or is it all malls?)
So most people who live in British towns and cities will be within walking distance of a chippy. They are the original British fast food joint, although they have been around for longer than we've adopted the name 'fast food' from accross the pond. And typically they do not have a seating area, so it is 'take away' only.

The meals used to be wrapped in newspaper, but nowadays that is forbidden by law: they use white kitchen paper instead, with greaseproof paper bags inside to hold the individual items.

You can order your food 'wrapped' or 'open' - the latter means it is ready to eat with the fingers (or with little wooden chip forks - although these are more common at the seaside where the chips are more likely to be served on a polystyrene dish) as soon as you wander outside the shop. 'Wrapped' is for taking home, unwrapping and serving on plates.

During my childhood we always had fish and chips from such an establishment on Friday lunchtimes. In fact the fish (cod fried in batter) was the only type of fish I knew, and remember remarking that I quite liked the brown crispy outside of fish, but wasn't so keen on the white fleshy inside!!

Menu would be various types of fried fish ie cod, haddock, plaice, rock eel (this is down south - up north you just get anonymous 'fish'!), sausages in batter, fishcakes (fish flakes mixed with mashed potato and seasoning, covered in breadcrumbs and deep fried), various pies eg chicken, steak and kidney, all served with copious portions of chips (french fries to the americans, but chips from chippies tend to be much soggier).

Nowadays you are also likely to be able to get burgers, spring rolls and other slightly more 'cosmopolitan' dishes also.

[ 10. June 2004, 20:54: Message edited by: Gracious rebel ]

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dorcas

Ship's florist
# 4775

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Getting back to the linguistic differences between the US and the UK, what about these little things?

..............

In the UK, one of these little dots at the end of a sentence is called, very logically, a "full stop" - because you've come to a complete stop. The end. Finished.

Over the water, however, they call this little dot a "period" - much to the confusion and embarassment of the British [Hot and Hormonal] to whom it means - well, what DO they call "that time of the month" in the States?

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Jonah the Whale

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# 1244

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quote:
Originally posted by Sir George Grey, back on page 2.:
One characteristic of British people that friends of mine have often complained to me about is that they won't say what they mean. Implication is an important part of conversation; it's impolite to give anything straight.

I got the following email a while back. At first I thought it was funny, then it hit me that most of the foreigners I know really do need Britspeak translating for them, even though to your average Brit these things are self-evident.

quote:
It is well known that the British do not always say what they really mean. So, with the growing international nature of business, the definitions below may help people from other nations understand their British counterparts better.


What They Say...What They Mean

I hear what you say...I disagree and do not wish to discuss it any further
With the greatest respect...I think you are a fool
Not bad...Good or very good
Quite good...A bit disappointing
Perhaps you would like to think about…./it would be nice if…....This is an order. Do it or be prepared to justify yourself
Oh, by the way/Incidentally...This is the primary purpose of our discussion
Very interesting...I don’t agree/I don’t believe you
Could we consider the options...I don’t like your idea
I’ll bear it in mind...I will do nothing about it
Perhaps you could give that some more thought...It is a bad idea. Don’t do it
I’m sure it is my fault...It is your fault
That is an original point of view/brave option to consider...You must be crazy
You must come for dinner sometime...Not an invitation, just being polite
Not entirely helpful...Completely useless


So, you Johnny Foreigners, I hope you don't find the above glossary entirely unhelpful.

Jonah.

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AngelaSo
Shipmate
# 6699

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quote:
Originally posted by dorcas:

In the UK, one of these little dots at the end of a sentence is called, very logically, a "full stop" - because you've come to a complete stop. The end. Finished.

Over the water, however, they call this little dot a "period" - much to the confusion and embarassment of the British [Hot and Hormonal] to whom it means - well, what DO they call "that time of the month" in the States?

Regretfully, Americans (and Canadians too!) call "that time of the month" "period" too. [Hot and Hormonal]

Or you can use the m-word... but it's too mouthful.

[ 10. June 2004, 23:32: Message edited by: AngelaSo ]

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Anselmina
Ship's barmaid
# 3032

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Lyda Rose

If it's any consolation, we think of Dubya as a cute hoor

I couldn't let this pass. 'Hoor' is the Belfast dialect for 'whore' as in 'Ye wee hoor, ye! Ye've been out wi' tha' eejit boyfriend o' yurs til 4 in the mornin'. Don't think I don't know what ye've been up tae. Ya dirty wee hoor!'

Also, in Northern Ireland doughnuts with holes in the middle are 'gravy rings' (why?).

If you go into a chippie (chip-shop) you ask for 'a chip'. No you will not get one single chip but an ordinary portion of chips.

If you go to the ice-cream van you ask for 'a poke' (well, maybe not these days?), meaning an ordinary ice-cream cone. 'Here, gis a poke, mister, wi' some monkey blood.' (rasberry sauce) Or alternatively 'hundreds and thousands' known as sprinkles elsewhere?

Lemonade comes in two colours: brown or white. And once upon a time you could get bottles of Kali Water - ie, carbonated water drunk by elderly people for medical purposes, universally disliked by everyone else in the family. Haven't times changed?

As for understatement and reserved politeness, the typical Ulsterman or woman is a pastmaster compared to the English who are only, by comparison, starting out. 'Is that so?' is the stock Ulster response to anything you might say that someone else might reply to with: 'you're a bloody liar and I don't believe a fecking word of it!'

And 'Ach, now then. Good for you, mate!' with the eyes half-averted or looking to heaven, is the biggest hint you'll get that either a) you're boring the knickers off me big time and can we please change the subject before my brain cells suicide in an attempt to preserve dignity during this conversation or b) say that again and you'll be eating your dinner through a tube for the next two months.

On the plus side: 'will ye have a wee cup of tea?' has a sub-text of: 'and several large sandwiches, buns (cup-cakes), shortbread slices, wedges of cake, buttered scones/bannock/soda bread and chocolate biscuits.'

You must also be prepared to be spoken to by anyone in a typical Ulster village. I still remember the shock I felt coming from England back 'home' to my parents' village when I walked past a group of 15-16 year olds who all said, totally without irony: 'All right then?' or 'Hello there!' as I, a complete stranger, passed them.

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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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quote:
Originally posted by AngelaSo:
Regretfully, Americans (and Canadians too!) call "that time of the month" "period" too. [Hot and Hormonal]

Or you can use the m-word... but it's too mouthful.

What? "Menses" is too big a word?

In the States, "full stop" is what you had better do at a stop sign.

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AngelaSo
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# 6699

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quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
quote:
Originally posted by AngelaSo:
Regretfully, Americans (and Canadians too!) call "that time of the month" "period" too. [Hot and Hormonal]

Or you can use the m-word... but it's too mouthful.

What? "Menses" is too big a word?


I mean to say "menstruation". Strange - the word "menses" didn't come to my mind.

[ 11. June 2004, 03:13: Message edited by: AngelaSo ]

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chive

Ship's nude
# 208

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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Lyda Rose

If it's any consolation, we think of Dubya as a cute hoor

I couldn't let this pass. 'Hoor' is the Belfast dialect for 'whore' as in 'Ye wee hoor, ye! Ye've been out wi' tha' eejit boyfriend o' yurs til 4 in the mornin'. Don't think I don't know what ye've been up tae. Ya dirty wee hoor!'
Or in the west coast of Scotland where it has this meaning but also extends to a word meaning 'very':

'That was a hoor of a good laugh.'
'She's a hoor of a stupid,' or even
'That lass is a hoor of a hoor.'

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Ormo
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# 4805

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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:

Also, in Northern Ireland doughnuts with holes in the middle are 'gravy rings' (why?).

I was going to post that earlier, but I thought someone else would. I had no idea that was norn iron only though...
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Schroedinger's cat

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# 64

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One thing that is important to understnad about the British ( or at least the English ) is that a foreigner can be someone who comes from 10 miles away. When I was in Norwich, I remember a couple who had lived there for 40 years saying that they were starting to be accepted into the area. Another generation or two and they would be considered a part of the city.

I think this is much more a feature of the non-South-East ( Which is London and the surrounding areas, known as the Home Counties ). In the South East, there is a very high degree of movement in and out, which means that you can be considered a part of the area/town/city within a year or so. Having grown up in the area does always help.

In the non-South East, to be accepted as part of the community requires at least a generation having being born, lived and died there. We had some friends who moved up to Yorkshire. He found he was accepted far easier when he mentioned that he had ancestors ( grandparents, I believe ) who came from Yorkshire. He was simply coming home. The broad Scottish accent, and German wife, were mere recent affectations that could not really impact upon his essential Yorkshireness.

Chippy - spelt either way - is the place for fish and chips. If you visit our country, you must try one. Unless you are visiting Anselmina, don't ask for a chip, and definately don't ask anyone for a "poke", unless you want to experience the NHS.

If you really want to understand the English way of saying something and meaning something entirely different, then watch "Yes Minister" or "Yes Prime Minister". These include "that's very brave minister", meaning "It is the most crass and stupid idea I have heard today, but if you want to throw way your political career, this is one way of doing it".

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Rat
Ship's Rat
# 3373

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quote:
Originally posted by Lady R of Ashwood:
'How interesting' is also a term of derision, Rat.

I agree it is in your examples, especially when accompanied by an expressionless voice and a change of subject. But 'how interesting that yadda yadda yadda' is OK in my book since it implies you really are interested and want to carry on the conversation.

Goodness me, at this rate I'm not going to be able to say anything at all for fear of inadvertantly deriding someone. Some people, of course, might consider this a consummation devoutly to be wished [Biased]

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Rat
Ship's Rat
# 3373

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quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:

Chippy - spelt either way - is the place for fish and chips. If you visit our country, you must try one. Unless you are visiting Anselmina, don't ask for a chip

Unless you are in Dumfries where it is also a chip, or so a good friend tells me.

Also, if you are visiting a Scottish chip shop try not to get involved in the whole salt & vinegar versus salt & sauce controversy. It can get quite nasty.

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It's a matter of food and available blood. If motherhood is sacred, put your money where your mouth is. Only then can you expect the coming down to the wrecked & shimmering earth of that miracle you sing about. [Margaret Atwood]

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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It would be a "fish supper" in Glasgow.

You can order a "haggis supper" as well - deep-fried haggis & chips. Slurp.

In Lancashire you can have "parched peas", slightly different from the "mushy peas" in other parts.

In the real south east of England (i.e. south of the Thames and east of the Solent) dogfish gets its proper name of "huss".

In the north-east of England you get stotty cakes.

[ 11. June 2004, 12:45: Message edited by: ken ]

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Rat
Ship's Rat
# 3373

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You mean it isn't called a fish supper everywhere? Heathens.

Please tell me you get smoked sausage suppers, white pudding suppers and black pudding suppers down there? If not, I think you've paid too high a price for your choice of fish.

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It's a matter of food and available blood. If motherhood is sacred, put your money where your mouth is. Only then can you expect the coming down to the wrecked & shimmering earth of that miracle you sing about. [Margaret Atwood]

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chive

Ship's nude
# 208

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What's all this talk about chippies? The correct term is 'chipper'

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'Edward was the kind of man who thought there was no such thing as a lesbian, just a woman who hadn't done one-to-one Bible study with him.' Catherine Fox, Love to the Lost

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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:
One thing that is important to understnad about the British ( or at least the English ) is that a foreigner can be someone who comes from 10 miles away. When I was in Norwich, I remember a couple who had lived there for 40 years saying that they were starting to be accepted into the area. Another generation or two and they would be considered a part of the city.

Sounds like as story I heard about a man in a small town in Vermont. His parents moved there with him when he was two weeks old. When he died there at age 97, they buried him and put up a headstone which read:
quote:
Beloved, though a stranger among us.


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I upped mine. Up yours.
Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?

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Anselmina
Ship's barmaid
# 3032

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In the context of Europe (rather than the USA), one of the strange things our co-continental chums find about the British is that we have fewer bank holidays than they do, work longer hours but have (according to news reports and documentaries so that may be dodgy info!) either just the same or less amount of productivity than them.

In other words, while from an American perspective we may not appear to put too many hours in at the office; from the European perspective not only do we spend too long at the factory or desk, but we don't necessarily have anything more to show for it!

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