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» Ship of Fools   » Ship's Locker   » Limbo   » Heaven: I am a Nazi. Apparently. (Page 6)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: I am a Nazi. Apparently.
Grits
Compassionate fundamentalist
# 4169

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I believe your child may have a great future in mediation. [Big Grin]

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Lord, fill my mouth with worthwhile stuff, and shut it when I've said enough. Amen.

Posts: 8419 | From: Nashville, TN | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
Just to add: apparently broccoli risotto is also Nazi food. 45 minutes of staring at it was insufficient to render it acceptably palatable.

OK, now I'm on your side. I would be someone's slave for a week if they'd cook any kind of risotto for me.
Posts: 24453 | From: La La Land | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
QLib

Bad Example
# 43

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Although I might now share Ruth's views on broccoli risotto I have to say that, when I was a child, it would have brought me, too, out in open revolt.
Posts: 8913 | From: Page 28 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pyx_e

Quixotic Tilter
# 57

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Ruth and Prince Harry . Who would have thunk it.

P

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It is better to be Kind than right.

Posts: 9778 | From: The Dark Tower | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

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Hmm. We've got Laura offering sexual favours for hob-nobs, and Ruth offering slavery for risotto.

I really hope no-one calls your bluffs. [Biased]

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

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Benedictus
Shipmate
# 1215

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Well, now, slavery for a week for risotto makes me nervous. Is risotto that hard? I wouldn't have thought so, as long as you have the right kind of rice.

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Resentment: Me drinking poison and expecting them to die

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Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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It takes about and hour and a half of patient stirring and careful simmering to make risotto. After sauteeing onions, you saute arborio rice in olive oil for a few minutes, then you spend an hour and a half pouring broth and then wine by the cupful into the rice and letting it absorb, then you pour a bit more, let that absorb, etcetera ad infinitum. Toward the end you can add chicken, shrimp, other veggies, whatever, then some cheese, then fluff and eat. It's a lot of work.

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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It's a lot of work, it's boring, and it can go very wrong. Note too that the week's slavery would come after the risotto consumption. [Big Grin]
Posts: 24453 | From: La La Land | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
welsh dragon

Shipmate
# 3249

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I've never really been a risotto person. I prefer more protein to my savoury stodge, I think...
Posts: 5352 | From: ebay | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Riv
Shipmate
# 3553

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Risotto is Slow Food in the truest sense.

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"I don't know whether I like it, but it's what I meant." Ralph Vaughan Williams

"Riv, you've done a much better job communicating your passion than your point. I have absolutely no idea what you are talking about." Tom Clune

Posts: 2749 | From: Too far South, USA. I really want to move. | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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I love to cook, but I must confess, I'm tempted to do what my sister does and make risotto in a pressure cooker. But that seems ... wrong somehow.

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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I use the same method, but it only takes about half an hour. Either we have softer rice over here, or I'm just a lot less fussy.

In fact, it's one of the new dishes in The Spouse™'s repertoire, and very tasty his risotto is too. But he would be the first to admit he is not an experienced cook. Though he is patient.

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Mertseger

Faerie Bard
# 4534

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quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
It takes about and hour and a half of patient stirring and careful simmering to make risotto. After sauteeing onions, you saute arborio rice in olive oil for a few minutes, then you spend an hour and a half pouring broth and then wine by the cupful into the rice and letting it absorb, then you pour a bit more, let that absorb, etcetera ad infinitum. Toward the end you can add chicken, shrimp, other veggies, whatever, then some cheese, then fluff and eat. It's a lot of work.

I broke a contact lens today, and so I read this last sentence as "Towards the end you can add children, shrimp,..." and I thought, wow, she really is beginning to loose her patience in this matter.

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Go and be who you are:
The Body of Christ,
The Goddess of Body,
The Manifest Song of Faerie.

Posts: 1765 | From: Oakland, CA, USA | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Rossweisse

High Church Valkyrie
# 2349

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I wonder.....could you make risotto in a Japanese rice cooker?

(And could I get the offspring units to consume it?)

Rossweisse // they think broccoli is poisonous

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I'm not dead yet.

Posts: 15117 | From: Valhalla | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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Changing sides again (sorry, Laura [Biased] ).

I didn't learn to eat broccoli till I was almost 30. Some things just can't be rushed.

Posts: 24453 | From: La La Land | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
AdamPater
Sacristan of the LavaLamp
# 4431

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I've been trying to convince MsP that brussels sprouts are just like baby cabbages, but she refuses to see it.

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Put not your trust in princes.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Risotto heresy time. After sauteing the onions and rice - you can add all of the liquid at once - leave on a low simmer.

And you can get instant polenta! (for those of us without grandmothers to do the required 3 hours of stirring).

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
I use the same method, but it only takes about half an hour. Either we have softer rice over here, or I'm just a lot less fussy.

Are you using the genuine Italian Arborio rice for risotto? It is a short-grain rice related to Japanese sticky rice or the stuff we use for rice pudding. It takes longer to cook than the Indian-style basmati rice we usually use here - which is a little like the long-grain rice they have in the USA, but differs from it in that it actually tastes of rice instead of just neutral starch.

Why would anyone want instant polenta?

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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It's not a question of fussy. Proper arborio rice takes a very long time to absorb enough liquid to be not crunchy and hard.

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

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Benedictus
Shipmate
# 1215

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Is it doable in a slow cooker? Add liquid periodically (or even, gasp, all at once) and just let it sit there for a couple of hours?

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Resentment: Me drinking poison and expecting them to die

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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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I am using arborio rice, and it isn't hard or crunchy after half an hour, but I wouldn't be surprised if I'm not cooking it on a low enough heat, so it isn't absorbing the flavours quite enough.

We are going to our favourite Mad Italian Restaurant (run by resident Mad Italian) so perhaps I should ask him how long it takes to cook risotto, with the rice you get here?

Though I know there's an even posher kind of rice than arborio, so perhaps that's what he'd use.

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Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
I am using arborio rice, and it isn't hard or crunchy after half an hour, but I wouldn't be surprised if I'm not cooking it on a low enough heat, so it isn't absorbing the flavours quite enough.

We are going to our favourite Mad Italian Restaurant (run by resident Mad Italian) so perhaps I should ask him how long it takes to cook risotto, with the rice you get here?

Though I know there's an even posher kind of rice than arborio, so perhaps that's what he'd use.

I'd be interested to hear anything your Mad Italian has to say.

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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Oops. Forgot to ask. Or actually, thought about asking, but he was looking forbiddingly out of the hatch between the kitchen and the dining room, right at me (it's a very small restaurant) and I didn't feel up to it.

But I did notice the risotto was slightly al dente. Not crunchy, just not rice-pudding-soft.

ETA: Can you bake risotto in the oven, like you do rice pudding?

[ 14. January 2005, 22:02: Message edited by: chukovsky ]

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Posts: 6842 | From: somewhere else | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Josephine

Orthodox Belle
# 3899

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quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
Just to add: apparently broccoli risotto is also Nazi food. 45 minutes of staring at it was insufficient to render it acceptably palatable.

I don't eat anything with broccoli or cauliflower. Even tiny amounts of either vegetable are truly awful.

This and this may explain why.

There's also a chemical in liver which some people taste and some don't -- I taste it. My mother didn't. (We got to taste little paper strips with the chemical in my high school biology class. The non-tasters thought the reactions of the tasters were funny. The tasters were not amused.)

In any event, you might consider the possibility that children who refuse to eat broccoli are not being difficult. They may be reacting to what is, to them, an extremely bad taste.

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I've written a book! Catherine's Pascha: A celebration of Easter in the Orthodox Church. It's a lovely book for children. Take a look!

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Ye Olde Motherboarde
Ship's Mother and Singing Quilter
# 54

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Unfortunately, Chukovsky,it is one of those time intensive (although it doesn't seem long) stirring rituals on the stove top. Afterwards, however, the melting risotto in your mouth is heaven! It IS worth the effort, I've been making risotto for over 40 years.

[ 14. January 2005, 22:25: Message edited by: Ye Olde Motherboarde ]

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In Memory of Miss Molly, TimC, Gambit, KenWritez, koheleth, Leetle Masha, JLG, Genevieve, Erin, RuthW2, deuce2, Sidi and TonyCoxon, unbeliever, Morlader, Ken :tear: 20 years but who’s counting?..................

Posts: 4292 | From: Looking for more trouble to get into | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ye Olde Motherboarde
Ship's Mother and Singing Quilter
# 54

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and, if you are doing something for people you love, then any effort is worth it......
RIGHT?

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In Memory of Miss Molly, TimC, Gambit, KenWritez, koheleth, Leetle Masha, JLG, Genevieve, Erin, RuthW2, deuce2, Sidi and TonyCoxon, unbeliever, Morlader, Ken :tear: 20 years but who’s counting?..................

Posts: 4292 | From: Looking for more trouble to get into | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
kinder
Shipmate
# 8886

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quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:

ETA: Can you bake risotto in the oven, like you do rice pudding?

Yes. Either Cook's magazine or the NY Times did a series of recipes for risotto (using Arborio rice) that could be made a ahead for when you have guests. Some were finished off either on top of the stove for a short time after the guests arrived or finished off in the oven.
When I make risotto, it only takes about 1/2 - 3/4 of an hour stirring in the broth, etc, once the initial sauteeing is done. Do you keep your broth hot on another burner while you are stirring?

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"I can actually say that after 4 1/2 years of therapy and intense spiritual healing, I no longer hate George Bush. But at the same time, I have committed my life to his overthrow. I mean 'overthrow' in a loving, Christian way...."

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Rossweisse

High Church Valkyrie
# 2349

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quote:
Originally posted by Ye Olde Motherboarde:
and, if you are doing something for people you love, then any effort is worth it......
RIGHT?

Should I bring this up the next time I hit town?

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I'm not dead yet.

Posts: 15117 | From: Valhalla | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
QLib

Bad Example
# 43

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But the idea that you cook something out of love, which means that the people you love are obliged to eat it - otherwise they are rejecting not just your food and your labour but also, somehow, your love, takes us into very dodgy territory.

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Tradition is the handing down of the flame, not the worship of the ashes Gustav Mahler.

Posts: 8913 | From: Page 28 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Qlib:
But the idea that you cook something out of love, which means that the people you love are obliged to eat it - otherwise they are rejecting not just your food and your labour but also, somehow, your love, takes us into very dodgy territory.

When you cook something out of love - you cook something that person will love, something that makes them feel special and cared for.

For Gremlin this would mean garlic mushrooms, lasagne and then some home-baked cheesecake. If I were to substitute creme caramel for the dessert he would be wondering what he has done to offend me. It has got nothing to do with how well I can make creme caramel (very well), but how much he hates the stuff.

If I feed food to people that I know they do not like it is saying "I do not care about your likes and dislikes. Your comfort is unimportant to me. You are unimportant to me"

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
If I feed food to people that I know they do not like it is saying "I do not care about your likes and dislikes. Your comfort is unimportant to me. You are unimportant to me"

On the contrary. It shows how much you care, because you know it's good for them. (Things that are good for you are usually unappetizing but that's life. You can't live on sweet things.) If they really cared about your caring about them, they'd eat it.

In fact, forget the food, just serve a handy snack of guilt, resentment and so on instead. Sprinkle with a few reminders about wasting money for that extra effect, and in no time, you have the perfect recipe for mealtimes from hell.

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Pegasus*
Shipmate
# 5779

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
If I feed food to people that I know they do not like it is saying "I do not care about your likes and dislikes. Your comfort is unimportant to me. You are unimportant to me"

Or sometimes it's just saying "Look, we have a large family and not very much money. I've been on my feet all day, I'm working twelve hour shifts and I'm dead on my feet. I don't have time to work out a meal that will not offend any of the seven people who are eating it, so please just eat the caulifower without making a fuss about it."

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Not a Proper Christian™

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
It shows how much you care, because you know it's good for them.

Rubbish! There are things that are 'good for you' that some people can not stomach. Whilst they might be good for the population as a whole they are not good for an individual, and to give it to that individual shows a lack of concern for their wellbeing.

quote:
Originally posted by Pegasus:
so please just eat the caulifower without making a fuss about it."

That is fine unless you have someone in your family who finds the taste of cauliflower/ broccoli/liver etc totally disgusting and is unable to eat the meal because of that.
Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Smudgie

Ship's Barnacle
# 2716

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I am a supertaster. My parents initially tried to make me eat various "healthy" items which simply made me feel incredibly nauseous... much as I longed to eat them (being an extremely biddable child and also finding some of the things looked extremely tempting e.g. curry). But fortunately for me my mother's view was that mealtimes and eating should be an enjoyable family experience rather than a power struggle, and that as long as I was not having excessive sweet things and was having a relatively healthy diet apart from the lack of vegetables, she reckoned I'd probably survive!

With my own two it was interesting as the first arrived with a voracious appetite and would eat (and still does) anything that stands still long enough. He loves trying new tastes and has quite a sophisticated palate and a preference for healthy food. No problem feeding this one, apart from the mammoth task of keeping the larder full!

The younger came with a long list of what he would and would not eat. He would only eat bananas as fruit, would only drink blackcurrent squash, would only eat carrots as veg and for tea would only have ham sandwiches. The approach I adopted was to make sure he had enough of these to keep him adequately fed and happy. Dishing up the dinner, I would say "Would you like one sprout or two?" and if he replied "one" or "two" I showered him with praise for trying a new food, saying that he could leave it if he found he didn't like them this time, but that one time he might well find his taste buds had changed and that was something new he'd be able to enjoy. If he said he didn't want any, I wouldn't give him any, but commented that he only had to let me know if he wanted to give them a try. It wasn't long before he was saying to most things "I'll give it a try and see whether I like them yet".

With other things which I, as a supertaster myself, knew were not strong tasting (e.g. apples) I would sometimes find that, surprise surprise, I didn't have any bananas left but did have an apple he could try. I'd make sure in this case that we were all eating apples, and that he wasn't really hungry but had enough of a gap to want something else to eat. Again I made sure it was his choice whether to have it or not, and put no pressure on.. still reminding him that sometimes it's worth a taste just to see if your tastebuds have grown up a little bit.

Letting him help prepare the food has also helped him make the choice to taste it. Funny how making cakes with raisins in can get you over a real hatred of raisins!

When we are away and there is a range of things pre-cooked for him to choose from on the table, this is where I put the main thrust of my "broadening his taste experience" efforts. The rule is that for each new thing he tries and finds he likes, he can choose one course of a meal once we're at home.

He now eats almost anything. He doesn't like peas, so I don't give him peas although I always offer them. He's not fond of kiwi fruit so I only give him that occasionally. He'll drink any drink and really enjoys water and milk. And his favourite meal now? A ham salad sandwich (it's boring without the salad) with a generous helping of coleslaw!

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Miss you, Erin.

Posts: 14382 | From: Under the duvet | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
QLib

Bad Example
# 43

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Babybear -re Ariel's post: switch on your irony detectors!
Posts: 8913 | From: Page 28 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pegasus*
Shipmate
# 5779

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Babybear, if anyone in my family really did find cauliflower, or anything else, all that loathsome then obviously they would be allowed to pick it out. My point was that when I had to prepare the family meals I sometimes gave people food they weren't fond of not because I didn't care about them, or their comfort was a matter of indifference to me, but because a hundred other pressing considerations, and the general family circumstances at the time meant that I couldn't cater to everyone's different preferences.

Food doesn't always have to be a signifier of the love you have for someone, or the importance they have in your life. Sometimes it's just something you eat becuase humans require nutrtion, and means nothing beyond that.

BTW, I liked your post a lot, Smudgie.

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Smudgie

Ship's Barnacle
# 2716

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Incidentally, I don't quite get the "I can't faff around cooking different things" approach. If I am doing broccoli, I do one portion less because I know I don't have broccoli with my meal. If I am doing peas, I do two portions less because I know Smudgelet doesn't have peas. It takes only a few moments to pop a few carrots in a pan to make sure we're catered for.

If it's a whole dish that someone doesn't like, then they're entitled to make themselves a sandwich and eat it along with the rest or separately. If there's a particular meal that only one member of the family likes and which takes a lot of preparation (what me? Cook?) then I might do it as a treat and the rest of us have something simple like pasta bake which does itself, or when we're out for a meal I would point it out to them on the menu and suggest they have it then!

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Miss you, Erin.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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I was a child during World War 2, when meat was rationed.

Every now and then we would have liver, and I was required to eat it. The taste was terrible, so I used to cut it into small pieces and swallow it quickly without chewing.

I disliked broccoli with equal intensity, but no one ever made me eat it.

As an adult I like broccoli but gag every time I try to eat liver. (Actually I've given up trying.) I'm sure my reaction to liver is a result of my childhood experience.

With my own children I didn't let them eat anything they wanted to, but I let them not eat anything they didn't want to. I also refrained from serving a meal which consisted entirely of things they didn't like.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Qlib:
Babybear -re Ariel's post: switch on your irony detectors!

Blast! Iron deficite! [switches on irony dectectors and receptors]
Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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Okay, because babybear has once again practically accused me of hateful cooking deliberately to upset my children (since obviously I couldn't have spent all that time on risotto out of love) (though I didn't actually claim that -- I made the risotto primarily because I wanted to see if I could, and also because my husband loves it) I will note for the record that both of my children like both broccoli and rice. So I was not offering them something I knew they hated, but rather, something I thought they might quite enjoy.

[ 15. January 2005, 15:16: Message edited by: Laura ]

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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And also, your honor, I made them ravioli on request last night. And tonight is taco/tortilla night, their favorite food night of ther week, at which they get to wolf down rice, black beans, tortillas, spiced chicken, salsa, etcetera.

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pegasus*
Shipmate
# 5779

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quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
Incidentally, I don't quite get the "I can't faff around cooking different things" approach.

I think it may be something to do with large families. Cooking carrots instead of peas for one person is pretty easy. Cooking carrots instead of peas for one person, and brocoli instead of carrots or peas for another person, and making sure the third has an extra portion of mash and so on can quicky get unmannageable.

In the end, what I used to do was do cook one big pot of greens, stick it on the table, and let people help themselves to the bits they wanted out of that.

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Not a Proper Christian™

Posts: 533 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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OK we're a smallish family (2 adults and 2 teens), but I do find myself often having to cook different meals for different people. But worse than that, there are days like today when you are not even sure who will be here at mealtime, let alone what they prefer to eat!

This morning I asked my sons their plans for the day and whether they would be here to eat tonight. Neither could give anything but the vaguest idea.

So I decided to make shepherds pie, as I've just recovered from a tummy bug and its the sort of 'bland' food that I crave. If and when I knew if they boys would be here, they could be offered that but if (as I suspected) they wouldn't eat it, I'd have to do them somethig else.

Turns out they are both here. Son no 2 is happy with the mashed potato part at least, (well as long as its grilled with cheese on top) so he's having that with a chicken pie out of the freezer.
Son no 1 won't eat mash in any form, so chose a ready meal from the freezer Chicken Tikka Massala. All are in the oven now.

I'm also cooking carrots, but son no 2 doesn't eat any cooked veg, and son no 1 only eats carrots raw unless he's really in the mood for them.

At least everyone is willing to eat banana & custard for afters!!

Methinks I've gone too far down the anti food-Nazi path!!

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Fancy a break beside the sea in Suffolk? Visit my website

Posts: 4413 | From: Suffolk UK | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
Okay, because babybear has once again practically accused me of hateful cooking deliberately to upset my children

Goodness knows if this is irony or not, cos my irony detector is still not working.

Laura, I have not practically, or impractically accused you of anything. I disagree with some of your methods, and you disagree with mine. I can not see that there is any benefit to be gained from forcing food on children, especially when that food that is often an acquired taste.

I know you well enough to be very aware that you love your children very much, and that you are doing your best to bring up your children. [no sarcasm, no condescension etc]

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Josephine

Orthodox Belle
# 3899

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Methinks I've gone too far down the anti food-Nazi path!!

That's definitely possible! At our house, we make sure there is at least one thing at each meal that we know each person at the table will eat. So, if we're having Thai shrimp curry over rice, Littlest One will eat the rice. And we'll usually put raw carrots on the table, too, because both Littlest One and Middle Son will (usually) eat them, and they're no trouble at all.

If someone decides they can't or won't eat anything on the table, they're welcome to fix a sandwich for themselves, and join the rest of us at the table.

We used to urge Middle Son (the pickiest of the bunch) to try new foods, but when he was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, our pediatrician told us that nearly all kids with AS are extremely picky eaters and that we should Just Back Off. She said that urging or encouraging would likely to make him more picky, not less. So we did, and eventually he did ask to try things that were being served to the rest of the family, and while he is still an extremely picky eater, he eats more than he used to.

I really like Smudgie's approach, as it seems both respectful and effective, which is, to me, a good thing.

And, Laura, I do know how frustrating it is to fix something you are sure your kids will like, only to have them refuse to touch it. That's especially frustrating when it's something they have eaten and enjoyed before. So, you were fixing some exotic shrimp dish for the adults, and went to the trouble of making some just plain popcorn shrimp for the boys, and then they wouldn't eat it, even though they have claimed to like it in the past -- that's a pain in the neck. But it happens.

For kids on the autism spectrum, though, like Middle Son and Littlest One, one of the things that plays into their food choices (besides sensory issues) is the fact that novelty of any kind provokes anxiety. Even new foods. And when they're feeling anxious or stressed out in other areas of their lives, I think they limit their food choices even more than usual, insisting on nothing but the same thing, prepared the same way as always.

It can be annoying, but I think meals are more pleasant for everyone when we concentrate on the social aspect of meals, and don't worry too much about who eats what.

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I've written a book! Catherine's Pascha: A celebration of Easter in the Orthodox Church. It's a lovely book for children. Take a look!

Posts: 10273 | From: Pacific Northwest, USA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
QLib

Bad Example
# 43

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quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
I will note for the record that both of my children like both broccoli and rice.

Well, mine went from eating almost anything (at about the age of two/three) through an increasingly steep curve of things they despised / disliked / wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole. This included, for example, red peppers, which at one stage had been sufficiently popular to be named on Santa's list. Things plateau'd at about the age of 14 (a low - or should that be high? - point in all sorts of ways) and now they are steadily increasing their repetoire. The youger one - now 18 btw - amazed me in December by requesting sprouts for Christmas Dinner.

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Tradition is the handing down of the flame, not the worship of the ashes Gustav Mahler.

Posts: 8913 | From: Page 28 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rosamundi

Ship's lacemaker
# 2495

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quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
ETA: Can you bake risotto in the oven, like you do rice pudding?

According to Queen Delia, yes, you can.

Dreadful person that I am, I cook mushroom risotto in the microwave. It takes about 20 minutes.

Deborah

[ 15. January 2005, 21:12: Message edited by: rosamundi ]

Posts: 2382 | From: here or there | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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My mother used to say, "I am not a short order cook!" in making us have "no thank you" helpings of okra and tomatoes (my mother's soul food).

I'm now considering what Mother Ogre's Hateful Cookery Book would contain. Eels in aspic? Broccoli Anchovy surprise? Oyster Stew With Okra? Mashed Swede and Meat Containing Bones?
[Big Grin]

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

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quote:
Originally posted by rosamundi:
Dreadful person that I am, I cook mushroom risotto in the microwave. It takes about 20 minutes.

Deborah

Would you believe I don't own a microwave? We're very old-fashioned. I don't like the flavor of things cooked in the microwave.

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Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
kinder
Shipmate
# 8886

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Our rule for kinder jr is that she is encouraged to try something she does not like, but not forced to eat it. If she doesn't find food enough on the table to suit, she is welcome to have have bread and butter as long as she makes it herself- and no complaints, no negative comments about the other food. It works pretty well, but she has gone off veggies that she used to eat. I figure I hated veggies when a kid, so she might just grow back into them.

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"I can actually say that after 4 1/2 years of therapy and intense spiritual healing, I no longer hate George Bush. But at the same time, I have committed my life to his overthrow. I mean 'overthrow' in a loving, Christian way...."

Posts: 126 | From: NY | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged



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