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Source: (consider it) Thread: Eccles: Daily offices
Cyclotherapist
Apprentice
# 9071

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I considered starting off with the Anglcan Breviary but I have been using Common Worship Daily Prayer since the beginning of Lent, and like it more than the BCP which is the only alternative I've ever really tried. I find it easy to use and I like its variety and flexibility and think I'll stay with it, although I've only set myself the target of saying at least one of the offices per day, which is hardly demanding. The main negative point for me is the need to juggle Bible, lectionary and office book at Morning and Evening Prayer, but I guess I'll get used to it.

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To recognise the basic difficulty in speaking of God is, in itself, relevant knowledge of God (Busch)

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The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
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Hello Cyclotherapist, welcome aboard!

The Breviary does negate the need for juggling books, except that it contains no music, so you need a hymnal or psalter for the hymn and psalm tones.

However, it is not the easiest book to navigate at first, and the introduction is itself rather daunting, but the rewards of plodding through it are great.

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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Cyclotherapist
Apprentice
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Thank-you Back-to-Front! Its really good to be on board after all that lurking......

I take your point about the convenience of the full-on breviary. However, I think I read somewhere that the problem of having to juggle books may be solved when the revision of this preliminary version comes out. Did anyone else see that and/or know when it might happen?

Best:

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To recognise the basic difficulty in speaking of God is, in itself, relevant knowledge of God (Busch)

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Amazing Grace*

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quote:
Originally posted by The Dumb Acolyte:
Amazing Grace, I believe this is one place where those who whine about the lectionary have got it exactly right. While the lectionaries may be sensitive to put right themes, authorship, and errors in redaction, one follows the two-year '79 BCP and never gets Numbers chapter one or Nehemiah chapter three. I'll grant that hearing that Shelumiel was the son of Zerushaddai or that Shallum repaired the Fountain Gate doesn't bolster the modern idea of worship. But, this smoothing down the rough edges of a Daily Office lectionary demonstrates a failure to understand what sort of person is actually grinding through it day by day--we can manage. The occasional reader of morning prayer would do well to leave the church wondering 'what was that all about?' or pausing to consider that Ono is more than Yoko's surname.

Okay, as one who came to the ECUSA post-1979, I'll bite; did previous Daily Office lectionaries slice the entire Bible up?

If so, you have illuminated an odd remark made by a member of my congregation who is extremely learned in the Scriptures when I learned of the existence of the Daily Office books, that the '79 BCP did not contain the Psalter entire. It does, which is why it was odd to hear this coming from him, but he was apparently confusing that with the lectionary/whole Bible thing.

Personally, having read the Bible front-to-back at least once in my fundy yoot, I have no trouble passing on such as you mention (I presume they don't appear in the Sunday lectionary, either), but you have an excellent point.

Charlotte

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.sig on vacation

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PaulTH*
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# 320

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I say Morning and Evening Prayer with Psalms from the BCP daily. I read through the Propers of the Saints and Seasons from the English Missal and say Mass to myself using either the Prayer Book canon or the pre Vatican II Roman canon as translated in the English Missal depending on mood. I have just obtained a Sarum Missal and I am considering using it for private prayer. Its all wonderful stuff in my opinion.

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Yours in Christ
Paul

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The Scrumpmeister
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quote:
Originally posted by PaulTH*:
I have just obtained a Sarum Missal and I am considering using it for private prayer.

Good man!

Was this print-to-order or were you lucky enough ti get your hand son one of the originals?

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Cyclotherapist:
I take your point about the convenience of the full-on breviary. However, I think I read somewhere that the problem of having to juggle books may be solved when the revision of this preliminary version comes out. Did anyone else see that and/or know when it might happen?

I think it's supposed to be this year. I'm not sure how they'll solve the juggling problem, unless the lectionary for daily prayer will somehow be incorporated, eliminating one book from the juggle. [Yipee]
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PaulTH*
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Dear Back-to-Front

It is a print to order copy from the USA. I would love an original!

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Yours in Christ
Paul

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The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
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Mine, too, is a print-to-order copy of the 1912/1913 reprint.

Unfortunately, this reprint seemingly contained an error, which I suppose only somebody who has access to a copy of the original edition from some 50 years earlier would be able to clarify:

It gives the reference for the Epistle for the Translation of S. Osmund (July 16th) as 'Ecclus. 1. 4, 1, 5-12, 15, 23'.

This does not seem to make much sense to me or anybody else who has looked at it for me and I have been unable to make contact with anybody who has the 1865(?) edition, who would be able to compare. [Frown]

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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IngoB

Sentire cum Ecclesia
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I'm much impressed by everybody's dedication. [Overused] To be honest, I don't even know how to do the Liturgy of the Hours properly... [Hot and Hormonal] Any book or web tips on that?

If you click here and then on "Display and booklet formats for the entire day", you can download (RC) PDFs for every day. They look complete to me (30+ pages each), but then I wouldn't really know.

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They’ll have me whipp’d for speaking true; thou’lt have me whipp’d for lying; and sometimes I am whipp’d for holding my peace. - The Fool in King Lear

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The Silent Acolyte

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Amazing Grace, thanks for the bite. Sorry for the delay in responding.

I am a whiner. I don't believe any lectionary actual walks one through the entire Bible. And, after all, the Orthodox don't use Revelation liturgically.

The 1928 Daily Lectionary seems not to give us Zerushaddai or Shallum of the Fountain Gate, nor Ono, and it omits the apocrypha.

As for the Psalms, unless, as complained about on a lost MW thread, one uses the New Zealand Prayer Book, one can use the implicit lectionary printed in the text of the Psalms (e.g., Twenty-seventh Day: Morning Prayer), which divides the book into 60 pericopes. I can't say whether either the 1979 or the 1928 lectionary completely covers the Psalms.

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Amazing Grace*

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Hmmmm. Now I might very well need to compare the '79 BCP Psalter to one of my Bibles and see what it leaves out, if anything. I doubt it does.

I really am enjoying the daily office book for my daily dose of Scripture (and copy of the daily offices) and will be "time sharing" the other volume with another Shipmate.

Charlotte

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.sig on vacation

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The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
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Apart from church services, does anybody actually say the office with anyone else, in more than the spiritual sense?

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Amazing Grace:
Hmmmm. Now I might very well need to compare the '79 BCP Psalter to one of my Bibles and see what it leaves out, if anything. I doubt it does.

The 1979 BCP psalter doesn't leave anything out (including dashing babies and wiping enemies out of the book of the living, dogs tongues in the blood of the wicked, etc.). To make sure you're covering it, if you're using the assignments in the lectionary, you need to leave in all the bracketed verses. If a whole psalm is bracketed and an alternative provided, do the bracketed psalm instead of the alternative.
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
Apart from church services, does anybody actually say the office with anyone else, in more than the spiritual sense?

My partner and I pray an office together, occasionally. On Christmas morning, we chanted a traditional BCP 1662 Matins together; I had made up some booklets of it so we could avoid juggling. Most of the chants came from the St Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter.

We also say Evening Prayer (USA 1979 BCP) or Compline together sometimes. I love it except when he's officiant and chooses to say about 143 collects.

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Amazing Grace*

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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
quote:
Originally posted by Amazing Grace:
Hmmmm. Now I might very well need to compare the '79 BCP Psalter to one of my Bibles and see what it leaves out, if anything. I doubt it does.

The 1979 BCP psalter doesn't leave anything out (including dashing babies and wiping enemies out of the book of the living, dogs tongues in the blood of the wicked, etc.).
Yes, well, before I had a clue about the Daily Office [Hot and Hormonal] , I had made a practice of reading the Psalter as a devotion according the "thirty days" division (both "morning" and "evening" parts usually at once). I remember such as you mention above (and days of Psalm 119), which made me doubt they'd left anything out.

Now the psalm bits we get in the Sunday lectionary seem quite edited to me.

quote:
To make sure you're covering it, if you're using the assignments in the lectionary, you need to leave in all the bracketed verses. If a whole psalm is bracketed and an alternative provided, do the bracketed psalm instead of the alternative.
Thanks for the tip, although I might go back to the thirty-day cycle (it is quite the range of human experience, is it not?) when I get organized enough to read the psalm as well as the OT/Epistle/Gospel.

Charlotte

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.sig on vacation

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Oblatus
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Those of you who pray some of the Daily Office in church: How do you typically say the psalms? I'm asking about spoken services rather than choral ones. Or do some of you chant them even without a choir? Anyway, how do you handle the psalms?

In my parish, the officiant says the first half-verse, and we all sit down. There's a short pause, and then the officiant finishes the first verse. We all join on the second verse, with a generous pause at the asterisk. We continue alternating verses like that. Then we add the Gloria Patri as though it were two more psalm verses (continuing the alternation from the psalm). If there are more psalms, the "side" whose turn it is (officiant or congregation) goes ahead with it, continuing the alternation.

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Amazing Grace*

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At my church, if the Psalm is spoken-not-sung, someone (usually the lay eucharistic minister du jour) will start us off with the first half verse, then that person sits down and it is usually recited in unison.

(Occasionally we get instructed to do sides-of-church, but in that case we usually alternate whole verses.)

Charlotte

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.sig on vacation

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Seeker963
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
with a generous pause at the asterisk.

The practice of the "generous pause after the asterisk" drives me crazy. (No direct offence intended, SK)

My understanding is that the asterisk is meant to be for the purposes of one person/group speaking the first half of the verse and a second person/group speaking the second. In many cases a "generous pause" is clearly wrong from the point of view of grammar and understanding.

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Seeker963:
quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
with a generous pause at the asterisk.

The practice of the "generous pause after the asterisk" drives me crazy. (No direct offence intended, SK)

My understanding is that the asterisk is meant to be for the purposes of one person/group speaking the first half of the verse and a second person/group speaking the second. In many cases a "generous pause" is clearly wrong from the point of view of grammar and understanding.

But it's a very widespread monastic practice. Among other things, it prevents rushing and provides a meditative rhythm. I would agree that it can be overdone.
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Seeker963
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Drives me crazy when it's


the middle of a sentence

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Seeker963:
Drives me crazy when it's


the middle of a sentence

In the psalms, though, it's between two parallel poetic phrases. They're usually independent clauses. Not quite the same as breaking up a sentence.
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dj_ordinaire
Host
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:


We also say Evening Prayer (USA 1979 BCP) or Compline together sometimes. I love it except when he's officiant and chooses to say about 143 collects.

143 is fine - although 142 or 144 would of course be a disgrace!
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dj_ordinaire
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quote:
Originally posted by Seeker963:
Drives me crazy when it's


the middle of a sentence

But think how splendid "Drives me crazy when: it's the middle of the sentence" sounds, especially when compared with the entirely unpointed alternative.

Having said that, I don't always use them!

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The Silent Acolyte

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Scott Knitter, what you describe is exactly how the psalms are read at the two places in town that read the office publically day by day.

Seeker963, this pausing at the asterisk, it is somewhat odd upon first hearing. It was odder still for me that the beginning of the next verse practically steps on the heels of the preceeding verse. Give it time. Don't resolve to hate it. It is a marvelous, formal way of yoking our time to the holy and of subordinating our temporal needs and expectations. Treat it as another queer practice of the the church that needs to be lived into to for it to be understood.

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
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I've tried, I really have -- and I still hate it.

A few of us are thinking of starting up a lay-led midweek Evening Prayer service at our ECUSA parish. Currently the only midweek services are during working hours, and both are Eucharistic services. I have absolutely loved it when I've been traveling and have stumbled across weekday Evening Prayer services, and every time I do I think, "We should have something like this at our church." It turns out I'm not the only one, and the rector is supportive. I would welcome any advice, suggestions and thoughts from folks with experience at this.

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Adrian1
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Amazing Grace wrote:
quote:
Thanks for the tip, although I might go back to the thirty-day cycle (it is quite the range of human experience, is it not?) when I get organized enough to read the psalm as well as the OT/Epistle/Gospel.
It's a sentiment I've expressed before but I think by far the best way to get to know the Psalter well is to read the Psalms through as the Prayer Book appoints them for each day of the month. If a better method exists I've yet to find it.

[Biased]

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The Parson's Handbook contains much excellent advice, which, if it were more generally followed, would bring some order and reasonableness into the amazing vagaries of Anglican Ritualism. Adrian Fortescue

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Seeker963
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quote:
Originally posted by The Dumb Acolyte:
Seeker963, this pausing at the asterisk, it is somewhat odd upon first hearing. It was odder still for me that the beginning of the next verse practically steps on the heels of the preceeding verse. Give it time. Don't resolve to hate it. It is a marvelous, formal way of yoking our time to the holy and of subordinating our temporal needs and expectations. Treat it as another queer practice of the the church that needs to be lived into to for it to be understood.

OK. May I say to Scott Knitter via this post, and to you, that no-one has ever explained the reason behind this practice to me before; understanding the history and the reason is always helpful.

I guess, for me personally, it distracts me from concentrating on the meaning of what I'm reading. But I'll resolve not to resolve to hate it. [Biased]

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"People waste so much of their lives on hate and fear." My friend JW-N: Chaplain and three-time cancer survivor. (Went to be with her Lord March 21, 2010. May she rest in peace and rise in glory.)

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Rossweisse

High Church Valkyrie
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I thought the asterisk was so you'd know when to switch from the first part of the chant tune to the second part.

Long pauses at the asterisk are Seriously Annoying, in my experience.

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I'm not dead yet.

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Margaret

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I was on retreat at the end of last week, and the psalms in the convent chapel were read with a longish pause at the asterisk. I've been there several times now, and every time I manage to be the idiot who forgets and charges straight into the second half of the verse. But I find that once I remember and get used to it again I like the rhythm it gives the reading, and especially the way it makes me aware of the structure of each verse, with its parallel ideas.
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Margaret:
I was on retreat at the end of last week, and the psalms in the convent chapel were read with a longish pause at the asterisk. I've been there several times now, and every time I manage to be the idiot who forgets and charges straight into the second half of the verse. But I find that once I remember and get used to it again I like the rhythm it gives the reading, and especially the way it makes me aware of the structure of each verse, with its parallel ideas.

The pause works especially well when the chant is accompanied by ever-so-light organ: at the asterisk, the organ moves through two or three chords to get us to the second half of the verse. It becomes very natural and prayerful and unrushed. And we all stay on pitch. [Yipee]
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Leetle Masha

Cantankerous Anchoress
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IIRC, the length of the pause at the asterisk is that of the slowly-and-silently-said Latin words, "Ave Maria". I suppose the original intent of saying "Ave Maria" at the pause was to provide a few seconds for meditation as one read each half of the psalm verses.

It's true, it would give the precentrix or organist a chance to correct the pitch or the tone if necessary. In really badly trained monastic choirs, it is possible for the decani to lose even the tone when the cantori are off pitch.

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Fermat
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In Common Worship Daily Prayer, an attractive orange diamond replaces the asterisk. Does that make it any more palatable??

I like the pause, and consequently am very embarrassed on the few occasions where I blunder straight on into the next line [Hot and Hormonal]

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Adrian1
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Some people advise the taking of a pause at the asterisk or colon if the Psalms and Canticles are said. Francis Wheeler in his 'Manual of Pastoral Theology' recommended a pause long enough to utter the words, 'Our Father.' Personally, taking a pause mid way through each verse is a practice I've got mixed feelings about. Whilst able to recognise the value of a reflective pause, I have attended weekday services in well known cathedral churches where the pause has been too long. This has disrupted the flow of the services for me and, I feel, needlessly slowed them down. That's only my experience though.

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The Parson's Handbook contains much excellent advice, which, if it were more generally followed, would bring some order and reasonableness into the amazing vagaries of Anglican Ritualism. Adrian Fortescue

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Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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I’ve recently started using Celebrating Common Prayer (the little “pocket” edition).

I suspect that, as others have commented, I will find the range of readings rather limited in time, but at the moment I’m very happy with it (especially Night Prayer). I don’t use any of the additional material (not that there’s much of it), largely because I’m very new to the offices and don’t know my way around them (looking at the Ordo that Thurible linked to from another thread I’m glad I don’t have the “full” version, I’d never know where I was).

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!

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Chapelhead*

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I’ve remembered the question I was going to include in my previous post.

In CCP there are various points marked with a cross. I assume that this is an indication that at this point one may/should say, “In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (and probably cross oneself, if one is that way inclined).

This indication appears at the start of the Gospel Canticle, which makes sense in that this is from the Gospel and is can therefore be seen as especially significant. It does not appear at the start of the Bible reading, however, even where this is from the Gospels. I assume that this is to keep greater uniformity in the way the readings are said – does this sound right?

What I find more surprising is that this indication also appears at the start of Night Prayer, but not Morning Prayer or Evening Prayer. I would have thought it would appear at the start of all the offices, or none.

I appreciate that this is of minor significance, but as a newcomer to the business of office reading I wondered if anyone could give a reason for only saying these words at the start of Night Prayer and not the other offices, other than the whim of the author.

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!

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dj_ordinaire
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Okay, I've never really had a look at CCP, but let's see if we can work this out...

Traditionally, crossing may denote "Father, Son, Holy Ghost" but you don't have to say the words whenever you do. I shouldn't think that CCP intends you to do so now.

The Canticles traditionally served as the high-point and focus of the Office, even if they were not the only portion taken from the Gospels (at Festal or Solemn services, candles are lit and altars incensed at this juncture). Those of the Higher persuasion retain various bits of ritual here, including crossing oneself at the start of the Canticle.

As to why a cross is indicated at the start of NP, but not MP or EP, I'm slightly baffled... no doubt someone more knowledgable than I will be along shortly

[Big Grin]
I think that the traditional mode would have been to cross your lips at "Oh Lord, open thou our lips" and make a bigger cross at "Oh Lord, make speed to save us" (I've certainly seen that done, anyway...)

How does the order for compline begin? If it is like the others, I can't see any reason for a cross being inserted here and not in the others. Although truth to tell I'm not sure I see the sense in having them at all - those who want to cross themselves will do so regardless of the marks, those who don't, won't (is my cynicism shewing again???)

Hope this vague ramble is of some help.

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Flinging wide the gates...

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GreyFace
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CCP Compline begins (in the version in front of me):

+ The Lord almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.

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DitzySpike
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Ok ebay has this book that I've been dying to get for two years and its going to be up for 4 more days. I probably wont have much of a chance to win it and catholic guilt plus lent made me a bit selfless...

HOWARD GALLEY's Prayer Book Office is available!It's based on the 1979 ECUSA enriched with anitphons and everything else you can raise it to moments of spikes. It's rare and it's useful. Take my words for this.

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
Ok ebay has this book that I've been dying to get for two years and its going to be up for 4 more days. I probably wont have much of a chance to win it and catholic guilt plus lent made me a bit selfless...

HOWARD GALLEY's Prayer Book Office is available!It's based on the 1979 ECUSA enriched with anitphons and everything else you can raise it to moments of spikes. It's rare and it's useful. Take my words for this.

It's on my eBay watch list, and I would dearly love to have it -- for an insanely low price, which I know is not going to happen -- but I do have a copy, albeit not in new condition. So I probably won't bid, as I don't want to drive up the price. You're welcome. It would be very nice if someone from here were to win the auction and buy this fantastic breviary. I dearly wish they would reprint it!
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DitzySpike
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Ah Scott. You have a set of the new calmodolese books of hour that I'm coveting. Heh. Was that useful? Meanwhile Launcelot Andrewes Press is going to publish Canon Douglas Wilfred's Monastic Diurnal Noted. But I'm looking for the Dominican Book of Hours that uses the splendid ICEL Liturgical Psalter.

www.andrewespress.com/diurnal.pdf

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
Ah Scott. You have a set of the new calmodolese books of hour that I'm coveting. Heh. Was that useful? Meanwhile Launcelot Andrewes Press is going to publish Canon Douglas Wilfred's Monastic Diurnal Noted. But I'm looking for the Dominican Book of Hours that uses the splendid ICEL Liturgical Psalter.

www.andrewespress.com/diurnal.pdf

I have the new Camaldolese books? What are they called? [Smile] And yes, I'm going to get the Winfred Douglas MD Noted as soon as they tell us we can order it. I have one of the originals of the Vespers main volume. And more info on this Dominican book? I can see that I'm going to have to get a new credit card or something to finance these things once I find out where to get them. [Smile]

Scott, friend of all breviaries

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Adrian1
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DitzySpike wrote:

quote:
Ok ebay has this book that I've been dying to get for two years and its going to be up for 4 more days. I probably wont have much of a chance to win it and catholic guilt plus lent made me a bit selfless...

HOWARD GALLEY's Prayer Book Office is available!It's based on the 1979 ECUSA enriched with anitphons and everything else you can raise it to moments of spikes. It's rare and it's useful. Take my words for this.

That sounds interesting.

[Biased]

[ 08. March 2005, 17:57: Message edited by: Adrian1 ]

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The Parson's Handbook contains much excellent advice, which, if it were more generally followed, would bring some order and reasonableness into the amazing vagaries of Anglican Ritualism. Adrian Fortescue

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Chapelhead*

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Thanks for the information, dj_ordinaire. As GreyFace has said, in CCP EP/Compline starts

quote:
+ The Lord Almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end
while MP starts

quote:
O Lord, open our lips
and EP

quote:
O God, make speed to save us
I had assumed that the cross symbol for NP was related to the additional prayers listed early n the book, the first of which is

quote:
The Sign of the Cross
+ In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

but I may well have been wrong. It just seems odd that it should appear for NP but not MP or EP.

--------------------
Benedikt Gott Geschickt!

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DitzySpike
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quote:
Originally posted by Chapelhead:
Thanks for the information, dj_ordinaire. As GreyFace has said, in CCP EP/Compline starts

quote:
+ The Lord Almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end
It just seems odd that it should appear for NP but not MP or EP.
I think its because the opening words of compline originate from a monastic blessing.
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The Scrumpmeister
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quote:
Originally posted by Chapelhead:
Thanks for the information, dj_ordinaire. As GreyFace has said, in CCP EP/Compline starts

quote:
+ The Lord Almighty grant us a quiet night and a perfect end
while MP starts

quote:
O Lord, open our lips
and EP

quote:
O God, make speed to save us
I had assumed that the cross symbol for NP was related to the additional prayers listed early n the book, the first of which is

quote:
The Sign of the Cross
+ In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

but I may well have been wrong. It just seems odd that it should appear for NP but not MP or EP.

It helps to think of the Office as one ongoing prayer throughout the day. 'O Lord, open thou our lips' only appears at the beginning of the first office of the day. It wouldn't make sense for it to appear at the others, once it has already been said at the morning office. This is the pattern also followed in both the Anglican Missal and the Sarum Psalter. For some unexplained reason the Prayer Book has it at evensong as well. [Confused]

I must admit that even when it not part of the office that I am praying, I will append 'O Lord, open thou our lips', if it is the first office that I am praying that day, even if it be Evensong.

One usually crosses oneself during the liturgy at the words 'In the name of the Father...&c.', but one does not say that formula whenever crossing oneself. The symbol '+' is where you cross yourself. It doesn't indicate the saying of anything.

DitzySpike is, as ever, correct. The words 'The Lord God almighty grant us a night of quietude, and perfection at the end of all our days' is a blessing and is traditionally preceded by a request for this blessing, usually from the superior(?). If saying it alone, of course this is not possible, but in a monastic setting, this is what is done, and where the practice originates.

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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The Scrumpmeister
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quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
This is the pattern also followed in both the Anglican Missal and the Sarum Psalter.

Of course, I meant the Anglican Breviary.

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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Bartolomeo

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I've been following this thread and reading through the links. I'd like to start a habit of more frequent structured prayer.

I am most comfortable with contemporary langauge and would find the archaic forms a distraction. Being in the U.S. and from a low church background, I'm not sure quite where best to turn.

From reading through the material linked, it would appear that I would be most comfortable with the "Common worship: Daily Prayer" volume. It is, apparently, presently out of print while the final edition is being prepared for publication in May. I'm willing to wait. Doesn't look like it will be available in an edition that includes the readings, though, so I'll end up having two books.

A closely related question: What prayer and service books are typically carried by ecumenical chaplins and missionaries who may be called upon to perform the various special services and rites for those from a variety of faith backgrounds? I think such material would make interesting reading.

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"Individual talent is too sporadic and unpredictable to be allowed any important part in the organization society" --Stuart Chase

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The Silent Acolyte

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Bartolomeo, try the 1979 American Book of Common Prayer (Rite II) with the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible. These aren't archaic to your ears, are they?
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by The Dumb Acolyte:
Bartolomeo, try the 1979 American Book of Common Prayer (Rite II) with the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible. These aren't archaic to your ears, are they?

And you can get them bound as one book, too, from Oxford U Press. Hardcover or leather.
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