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Source: (consider it) Thread: Eccles: Daily Offices Redux
Patrick
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Regarding the Collegeville Short Breviary, there are three different versions: the earliest printing was very much Benedictine in its orientation. The versions printed in the 50's dropped the Monastic Prime and Compline features and Benedictine feasts but added, in the Complete Edition, the Psalms omitted in the weekly cursus, in the form of a three week nocturn arrangement. This edition of the Short Breviary included lengthly Biblical readings for Matins arranged in accordance with the liturgical year. Colllegeville published the last edition of the traditional Short Breviary in the late 60's. That edition contained full tones for the Psalms as well as music for the Office Hymns, but abandoned "Prayer Book" English and employed, instead, a dignified form of contemporary English. The second and third editions could be purchased with a Franciscan supplement. I had purchased a Benedictine supplement to bind in my second edition Short Breviary. I believe that all three editions are worth studying since the Short Breviary is possibly the finest specimen of a popularly accessible lay traditional Office. It is particularly useful as a vademecum for travellers.
After Vatican II, Collegeville produced a single volume of the Liturgy of the Hours, titled Book of Prayer,with daily Biblical and Patristic readings as well as the traditional Office Hymns.
For various reasons,it threatened the sales of the official version of the LOTH and was, accordingly, surpressed by the American Catholic bishops. Collegeville viewed this book as the rightful successor to its Short Breviary. Of course that title is now given to Collegeville's most recent efforts at a popular Office, Benedictine Daily Prayer.
The English Office is a fine supplement to the BCP. Its orientation is slightly Sarum, so, for instance, no texts for the Presentation of the Virgin in the Temple, since Sarum did not include that feast. The very best effort at supplementing the BCP, in its American version, is Fr. Paul Hartzell's Prayerbook Office. Galley saw his book as an updating of Harzell, but Hartzell is solidly Sarum and Galley is, well, solidly Galley. The earlier, pre-60's editions of Hartzell are the most loyal to the medieval office. He includes, unlike the English Office, the proper hymns for both Matins and Lauds. On the other hand, Hartzell invariably uses "Alleluia" as the antiphon for the ferial psalter, whereas the English Office gives the proper antiphons.
There are copies of the Short Breviary now up for bidding on ebay. Bid and enjoy. I have not seen Hartzell's book on ebay for about a year.
Happy Theophany, or Old Kalendar Christmas, to all.

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DitzySpike
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On the Saint Meinrad Music site there is a link to the Saint Meinrad Antiphonale. The link is presently not active. Crossing my fingers.
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
On the Saint Meinrad Music site there is a link to the Saint Meinrad Antiphonale. The link is presently not active. Crossing my fingers.

Crossing mine, too! Wonder how fresh that page is.
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The Silent Acolyte

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This thread seems to have devolved into a Breviary Hound Dogs thread. So be it.

Arthur John Maclean. East Syrian Daily Office: Translated from the Syriac with Introduction, Notes, and Indices and an Appendix Containing the Lectionary and Glossary (Piscataway: Gorgias Press, 2003), a facsimile reprint of the original edition (London: Rivington, Percival, and Co., 1894).

It'll take some time for me to get to it, let alone crack open the contents, but I'll keep you apprised.

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Extol
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Do any of you ever use fixed "little hours" as part of your recitation of the daily office? I try to say at least one little hour a day from the ANGLICAN BREVIARY or breviary.net, but if I am in a pinch and can't set one up I go to

http://tinyurl.com/y8cvbl

or the set little hours in the old MANUAL OF CATHOLIC DEVOTION.

Can anyone with knowledge of the old Breviaries tell me if the little hours at the site above are reasonably sufficient? Thanks--

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Choirboy
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Not sure what you mean by 'sufficient'. Unless you are following a particular rule (e.g. Rule of St. Benedict) which governs liturgical sources or allocation of pslams to times/days/hours, then the only commandment is to 'pray unceasingly'. So, it's all good.

According to the site, the authors have borrowed their bits from several other sources including the Monastic Diurnal and other things they liked. In particular, the choice of psalms for the little hours doesn't follow the allocation from the Rule of St. B. but this may not be of primary importance. The structure of the little hours (in the sense of what bits go where) does seem fairly traditional which neither recommends nor penalizes it in the absense of some other rule of life.

I don't see any reason offhand why you shouldn't use the site.

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Choirboy
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
Crossing mine, too! Wonder how fresh that page is.

Regrettably, the Kyriale on the site is labelled 2003....And the fonts exist but aren't linked to. But then, I'm a natural pessimist by nature.
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Choirboy:
I don't see any reason offhand why you shouldn't use the site.

I'm sorry...this is not how I would ever want to start Lauds:

V. The Lord is high above all heathen.
R. And His glory above the heathens.

Sounds like a fixation with the "heathen," and probably a typo. I'll stick with the standard versions, thanks.

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Choirboy
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I guess I only looked at the little hours which are somewhat more standard.
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Extol
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Right, I was mostly interested in the fixed little hours--that Lauds howler is a laugh, though.
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Oblatus
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We've let this thread sink to page 2. [Frown]

Anyway, I've just found a monastic community that uses Benedictine Daily Prayer as its office book. Surprising, but perhaps it's a good one to start with.

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Divine Office
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Interesting. I had wondered for some time if any monastic community might adopt BDP as its standard breviary.

DIVINE OFFICE

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Olaf
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I have received my copy of Readings for the Daily Office from the early church and I am very satisfied with it. Thanks, TSA and Scott!
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
I have received my copy of Readings for the Daily Office from the early church and I am very satisfied with it. Thanks, TSA and Scott!

Loved the reading on Monday by the Celtic abbot, Columbanus. It was our second lesson at Evening Prayer. Enjoy!
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Extol
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quote:
Originally posted by Manipled Mutineer:
Picking up on Ditzyspike's reference earlier to the Short Breviary, does anyone have any experience of this work? I am considering (at some indeterminate point in the future) moving on from my current reading of the Little Office and, in looking for a traditional RC office in a language I can understand, am finding the prospect of this (in the 1941 or 1954 editions, I think) rather appealing. Would you recommend me to consider any other options? Any thoughts would be most gratefully received.

MM, no less a Roman Catholic luminary than Dorothy Day used a combination 1928 BCP/1940 HYMNAL for her daily offices toward the end of her life (I can cite a source if you give me a few minutes). She preferred it to the complex offices of the Roman Breviary; she did not offer an opinion on the LOTH.

I have bounced around quite a bit in terms of Office use myself, but, perhaps inspired by "St." Dorothy's example, have settled for the most part on a discipline that may meet your preferences as well. I c/p the daily 1928 MP and EP from one of the two main online sources into a document, then paste the Hymn, V/R, Antiphon to Ben. or Mag., and collects and commemorations from the online Roman Breviary in their appropriate places. This approximates the format of the ENGLISH OFFICE, which I have also used on and off, but is easier to set up quickly and cut out any flippity.

For little hours and Compline I either use the online Breviary or the fixed hours found in an edition of the old MANUAL OF CATHOLIC DEVOTION that I bought from a certain gentleman of some repute.

The only exception to this rule is when I actually recite the Office in public, which I either do from the '79 BCP at a local TEC parish or from the ANGLICAN BREVIARY at S. Clement's on Sunday evenings.

Note that I was a cradle Roman Catholic and swam the Thames; should I have to swim back at some point, I imagine I will stick to the same discipline, barring any significant reform to the LOTH.

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Manipled Mutineer
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Originally posted by lukacs:
quote:
MM, no less a Roman Catholic luminary than Dorothy Day used a combination 1928 BCP/1940 HYMNAL for her daily offices toward the end of her life (I can cite a source if you give me a few minutes). She preferred it to the complex offices of the Roman Breviary; she did not offer an opinion on the LOTH.

I have bounced around quite a bit in terms of Office use myself, but, perhaps inspired by "St." Dorothy's example, have settled for the most part on a discipline that may meet your preferences as well. I c/p the daily 1928 MP and EP from one of the two main online sources into a document, then paste the Hymn, V/R, Antiphon to Ben. or Mag., and collects and commemorations from the online Roman Breviary in their appropriate places. This approximates the format of the ENGLISH OFFICE, which I have also used on and off, but is easier to set up quickly and cut out any flippity.

For little hours and Compline I either use the online Breviary or the fixed hours found in an edition of the old MANUAL OF CATHOLIC DEVOTION that I bought from a certain gentleman of some repute.



Too kind, too kind. Thank you for the suggestion; I have actually, following Patrick's commendation, pulled the trigger on a 1951 printing of the first edition of the Short Breviary and will see how I get on, but it is alway nice to have options!

Anthony.

--------------------
Collecting Catholic and Anglo-
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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
I have received my copy of Readings for the Daily Office from the early church and I am very satisfied with it. Thanks, TSA and Scott!

Loved the reading on Monday by the Celtic abbot, Columbanus. It was our second lesson at Evening Prayer. Enjoy!
With the reading by Clement yesterday, it is hard to believe the Catholic Church is so closed-minded about ecumenism.
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Manipled Mutineer
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As my contribution to making sure that this thread doesn't fall off page 1, may I say that my copy of E.C. Trenholme/Society of St. John the Evangelist The Hours of Prayer from Lauds to Compline inclusive, compiled from the Sarum Breviary and other rites arrived in the post this morning, a fine 1961 5th edition, and very interesting it looks too!

You may also be interested to know that another copy is available here.

I also attempted to say the office of Vespers from a preconciliar copy of the Breviarium Romanum last night, which has convinced me that I mustn't try it again without at least an English crib for the rubrics - unless I go the whole hog of course and sell some of my less vital organs in order to purchase a bilingual version.

--------------------
Collecting Catholic and Anglo-
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Divine Office
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I also have a 1961 edition of the SSJE Hours of Prayer, and a fascinating work it is.

In addition, I have a 1950 edition of The Day Hours of the Church of England, which is fairly similar to the SSJE book in that it is largely based on the Sarum offices. I attempted to use it for Vespers during Advent, but found the rubrics rather complex with regard to the correct office hymns, commemerations etc. It is still an extremely interesting office book, though.

DIVINE OFFICE

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Manipled Mutineer
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quote:
Originally posted by Divine Office:
In addition, I have a 1950 edition of The Day Hours of the Church of England, which is fairly similar to the SSJE book in that it is largely based on the Sarum offices. I attempted to use it for Vespers during Advent, but found the rubrics rather complex with regard to the correct office hymns, commemerations etc. It is still an extremely interesting office book, though.

DIVINE OFFICE

Snap! I looked at it once (before I had found this thread or started saying any regular office myself (as simple as the Little Office is)) and the rubrics made my eyes water, so I gave up...

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Collecting Catholic and Anglo-
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BroJames
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Is it appropriate to ask on this thread whether people have any UK oriented suggestions for introducing young people to a pattern of daily prayer incorporating liturgical material? I think the full CW Daily Prayer is too much (even for many adults, frankly). But there seems to be hardly anything readily available for the use of the 10+ age group.
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malik3000
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
With the reading by Clement yesterday, it is hard to believe the Catholic Church is so closed-minded about ecumenism.

What was the reading, and can i find it on the web?

--------------------
God = love.
Otherwise, things are not just black or white.

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Is it appropriate to ask on this thread whether people have any UK oriented suggestions for introducing young people to a pattern of daily prayer incorporating liturgical material? I think the full CW Daily Prayer is too much (even for many adults, frankly). But there seems to be hardly anything readily available for the use of the 10+ age group.

Yes...I think Daily Prayer would be highly successful. You need a separate psalter with it, though. Still, I think that age group could get a lot from this office.
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by malik3000:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
With the reading by Clement yesterday, it is hard to believe the Catholic Church is so closed-minded about ecumenism.

What was the reading, and can i find it on the web?
It's St Clement's first letter to the Corinthians, XXXI to XXXIII.
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BroJames
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Is it appropriate to ask on this thread whether people have any UK oriented suggestions for introducing young people to a pattern of daily prayer incorporating liturgical material? I think the full CW Daily Prayer is too much (even for many adults, frankly). But there seems to be hardly anything readily available for the use of the 10+ age group.

Yes...I think Daily Prayer would be highly successful. You need a separate psalter with it, though. Still, I think that age group could get a lot from this office.
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll have a look at this. It's not exactly pocket money price, but more affordable from Amazon. I'd be encouring them to have some pattern of engagement with the Bible as well so not having Psalms/Readings in the book itself wouldn't necessarily be a problem.
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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Is it appropriate to ask on this thread whether people have any UK oriented suggestions for introducing young people to a pattern of daily prayer incorporating liturgical material? I think the full CW Daily Prayer is too much (even for many adults, frankly). But there seems to be hardly anything readily available for the use of the 10+ age group.

The learnèd Shipmate Scott Knitter has undoubtedly suggested a perfect resource, BroJames. He has pointed me and countless others in the direction of many a book.

Have you considered making your own booklets to introduce the offices? At Lent, in my humble opinion, would be an excellent time to make a booklet including a common domain office and Psalter specifically geared for Lent, together with the readings. If you made enough copies for your group, and left a few 'extras' laying around for others, you might spark an office craze at your parish! As an added feature, you could make it a point to use this pamphlet to pray Morning Prayer before your first Sunday liturgy, and to pray Evening Prayer before any Lenten midweek liturgies or study groups.

(This is coming from someone who would have a great time doing the tedious task of compiling a brevibreviary, though!)

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
The learnèd Shipmate Scott Knitter has undoubtedly suggested a perfect resource, BroJames. He has pointed me and countless others in the direction of many a book.

Bless you for this affirmation, Martin. [Angel]
And extra credit for the accent grave.

George Guiver in his excellent Company of Voices suggests having office books prepared for various assigned role-players: psalm-reader, canticle-reader, lesson-reader, leader of the singing, etc., which encourages at least those people to show up and to know how to carry out their role. Each would arrive and pick up her/his Daily Prayer with the appropriate materials marked with a ribbon marker and/or sticky flag. And all get to spend some time listening as well as some time reciting.

This would work well with the offices in Celebrating Common Prayer as well as with Daily Prayer from the reverend gents in Durham.

[ 18. January 2007, 02:45: Message edited by: Scott Knitter ]

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Choirboy
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I like the idea of each person just having their own part and listening to the rest - I like it a lot. You'd have to know the order well enough to know when to jump in, I suppose.

Also, it probably would be best to have one master copy with everything in case someone doesn't turn up....

That is, *** bump ***

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Autenrieth Road

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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
(This is coming from someone who would have a great time doing the tedious task of compiling a brevibreviary, though!)

Tedious? Surely not! (This is coming from someone who has gone through the lectionary and the bible making a complete table of what's included and what's omitted, though. [Biased] )

What ought to be in a brevibreviary? Perhaps it counts as brevibrevibreviary, but I (when I tackle it at all) use the Daily Devotions for Families and Individuals, which is one page each for Morning, Noon, and Evening Prayer. (There's both an Early Evening and Close of Day prayer, I've used whichever is closer to the time of day it is.)

I tend to treat the Daily Office Lectionary readings separately -- that is not read them inside of this miniature Daily Office, but in a block either right before or right after the Evening Prayer.

More often I've been in a mode of reading the lectionary readings, but not praying the office parts at all.

And truth be told, 99% of the time I'm not doing either [Frown] .

So my ultra-miniature is: 4 pages for the 4 offices. If you want the lectionary readings too, add about 65 pages for the lectionary specifications, plus a Bible.

--------------------
Truth

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kenosis
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I’m beginning to realise that I only post in this thread when I want to know something!

Anyhow, largely based on the recommendations I’d read here, I’ve shelled out on a St Helena Breviary Personal Edition. And I’m in love! As others have said several pages ago, its such a prayerful book, and the inclusive language flows so easily, that nothing else seems to come close.

After a trail through Common Worship Daily Prayer, Celebrating Common Prayer, Celebrating Daily Prayer, A Manual of Anglo-Catholic Devotion, Jim Cotters office book, Celtic Daily Prayer, the BCP in its many forms, Daily Prayer etc etc – its such a relief to find something that feels that it could really become my prayer book.

But I guess I’m not alone in finding it a real pig to use. They seem to expect you to have a finger in about four sections at once – and often having done that you have to then search for a two line antiphon in yet another section… I’m seriously thinking about compiling some booklets for each season with the prayers already arranged in the correct order.

I was just wondering how other people had overcome this, and how the Monastic Edition differs?

I’ve also noticed that there are some strange inconsistencies in the seasonal material, with Lent having a different psalm antiphon for each day of the week, while Christmas does not. And there isn’t an “Ordinary of Epiphany” section – so I’ve been using the Christmas bits instead. Is that right? And is there more of this in the Monastic Edition?

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Tom S:
They seem to expect you to have a finger in about four sections at once – and often having done that you have to then search for a two line antiphon in yet another section...I was just wondering how other people had overcome this, and how the Monastic Edition differs?

I don't have a copy of the personal edition, so I can't comment about the differences between the two.

However, it takes me six bookmarks (all right, 3x5" index cards) to use it easily. If the spine/binding on the SHB:Monastic weren't so loose, I'd use a ribbon marker with six sturdy ribbons. (Others upthread have given me good ideas, but you know how that goes!) I have to reset three of the markers for the next office at the end of the preceding one. They mark the beginning of the office, the correct day for the Psalms, and the spot where the office resumes after the hymn (I flip to the hymn with no marker). The remaining markers hold the place for First Class Vespers, for the current spot in the Sunday Propers, and for the current spot in the Commemorations. If I sacrificed any, the only one I could sacrifice would be the First Class Vespers one.

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Oblatus
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The Personal Edition is essentially the Monastic Edition minus the chant (and plus a few typos, courtesy of Church Publishing, which can always be relied on to mess things up to some degree). But a fine breviary for all the reasons mentioned earlier today. A set of ribbon markers--the type you slip into the spine--would be most helpful.

Generally, I would start the day by checking the proper of the saints for any observances that day and how they're handled. Typically a lesser feast would use one of the numbered commons but keep the psalms and their antiphons as appointed for the day.

The time after Epiphany isn't quite a "season" in the way Lent is. Weekdays in Lent are called (in some books, anyway) "greater ferias," and in that tradition the OSH breviary gives daily antiphons. That's also why lesser feasts are (in some books, anyway) only commemorated (rather than fully observed) in Lent...a greater feria trumps a lesser feast. The time after Epiphany is ordinary time, essentially, even though we're not into the numbered propers yet. So no daily proper antiphons; you simply stick with the ones in the two-week psalter.

One suggestion to get used to the OSH breviary: you may want to take two weeks and just use the two-week psalter every day, ignoring lesser feasts, so you would stay out of the Common and Proper of the Saints sections. Deviate from this only for the Sunday proper Gospel-canticle antiphons. Then when comfortable, start observing the lesser feasts using the Proper and the appropriate Common for each.

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kenosis
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
The time after Epiphany is ordinary time, essentially, even though we're not into the numbered propers yet. So no daily proper antiphons; you simply stick with the ones in the two-week psalter.

Ah - I had a feeling it was something like that, thank you. Basically I'm suffering from being a graduate from CWDP/CCP where Epiphany is a season (or as good as one) and therefore gets some great material in its own right.

Perhaps I really want a Franciscan edited version of the SHB - I wonder if they're open to suggestions?

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Olaf
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A while ago a question was posed about the differences between Augustinian, Benedictine, and Franciscan offices, but I'm not sure the issue was ever resolved. Does anybody remember where it was or how things turned out?

In other words, *bump*.

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scopatore segreto
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The monastic office followed St Benedict’s scheme for the weekly recitation of the Psalter. The secular clergy of Rome used a different Psalter arrangement. The Franciscans adopted not the monastic but the Roman Office, as simplified for the convenience of the Curia. Their enormous success as an order resulted in the widespread adoption of this throughout Europe, replacing local uses.

Don’t know about the Augustinians, but that might be a fruitful avenue of inquiry for a Lutheran, as Fr Martin was of course an Austin friar.

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dyfrig
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This may be a rather bizarre query, but does anyone know of a schema for reading the Psalms which appoints one psalm (or two short ones, or portions of long ones) for reading per day, assuming a single "office" said daily?

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Autenrieth Road

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You mean an official schema that someone has published? As opposed to just starting at the beginning, and reading two if they seemed very short that day, or just reading a portion if it seemed very very very very long?

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Extol
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quote:
Originally posted by Tom S:
Perhaps I really want a Franciscan edited version of the SHB - I wonder if they're open to suggestions?

Tom S--somewhere on this thread, I think, Scott Knitter cited a new Daily Office edited by the Community of Saint Francis in San Francisco: http://www.communitystfrancis.org/ . I used their old one at an SSF retreat once and quite liked it. Might be worth an inquiry to see if they'd sell you a copy.

[ 25. January 2007, 16:53: Message edited by: lukacs ]

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
quote:
Originally posted by Tom S:
Perhaps I really want a Franciscan edited version of the SHB - I wonder if they're open to suggestions?

Tom S--somewhere on this thread, I think, Scott Knitter cited a new Daily Office edited by the Community of Saint Francis in San Francisco: http://www.communitystfrancis.org/ . I used their old one at an SSF retreat once and quite liked it. Might be worth an inquiry to see if they'd sell you a copy.
They certainly will sell you one. I think it was about $60. It's a fine amalgam of concepts from the BCP 1979, Daily Office SSF, and The Prayer Book Office. Very durably bound and quite easy to use. I especially like the wide selection of canticles and their appointment to each day just like the psalms. Psalm distribution is the seven-week one of the BCP 1979, just presented a bit differently.

[ 25. January 2007, 21:51: Message edited by: Scott Knitter ]

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J.S. Bach
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Scott,

Is the Community of Saint Francis office book portable? Does it include the BCP79 daily lectionary?

I may purchase the St. Helena Breviary: Personal Edition if and when Church Publishing gets around to fixing the errors. The Monastic Edition is wonderful, but some days I can't pray all the psalms (even in matins and vespers), and the book is definitely not portable. I did take the SHB with me in the car for Christmas vacation, but it, bible, and BCP79 needed their own messenger bag.

Blessings,
J.S. Bach

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
Is the Community of Saint Francis office book portable? Does it include the BCP79 daily lectionary?

Yes to both. The CSF Office Book 2006 is approximately the same size (and color!) as the St Helena Breviary, Personal Edition. It includes and fully uses the BCP79 daily lectionary; it's just laid out a bit differently, with lessons, psalms, and canticles all given in one place for each day in Year 1 and Year 2.

Um, I'm thinking now that by lectionary you mean the lesson texts? No, just the citations for referencing the texts in a Bible or separate lectionary book.

I share your hope that the SHB Personal Edition might get a second, improved printing with typos fixed and better binding. My first copy bore only a couple of months of gentle handling before the last signature of pages in the book just dropped out of the binding. I complained to Church Publishing, and they sent me a replacement copy that I've been afraid to use. All this is Church Publishing's fault, not the OSH sisters, as their monastic edition, published by them, is much better proofread and bound (although I've had dodgy moments with the binding on that as well, but no pages falling out).

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by dyfrig:
This may be a rather bizarre query, but does anyone know of a schema for reading the Psalms which appoints one psalm (or two short ones, or portions of long ones) for reading per day, assuming a single "office" said daily?

dyfrig, some versions of the Bible include just such a pattern in their recommended daily Bible readings sections. I know I have seen at least one Zondervan NIV Bible that included it this way, among others.
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J.S. Bach
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
Um, I'm thinking now that by lectionary you mean the lesson texts? No, just the citations for referencing the texts in a Bible or separate lectionary book.

Thanks for the details. Sorry about the confusion on the lectionary question. I do mean the citations for the Bible lessons. I tend to use the term lectionary in this way because BCP79, C. of E. Common Worship, and others do so. Having all the lessons printed out is convenient but makes for a fat book (plus often I like to read the whole passages as well as switch to different translations).

The CSF office book sounds promising. It could be paired with one of the new NRSV Pocket Bibles from Oxford University Press.

JSB

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dyfrig
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quote:
Originally posted by Autenrieth Road:
You mean an official schema that someone has published? As opposed to just starting at the beginning, and reading two if they seemed very short that day, or just reading a portion if it seemed very very very very long?

Ooooooh, you think you're so clever with your clever clevernessness, now that you're an oh-so-clver host, with your cleverly clever answers. Oooooh [wags index finger]

[Biased]

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Extol
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Does anyone know of a little booklet or pamphlet that contains the four Marian Anthems? I'm lookiong for something that can be stuck in a BCP or handed out at a public Compline service.
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Choirboy
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In English or Latin?
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Extol
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In English, and with an emphasis on text rather than music.
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DitzySpike
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quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
Does anyone know of a little booklet or pamphlet that contains the four Marian Anthems? I'm lookiong for something that can be stuck in a BCP or handed out at a public Compline service.

Plainsong and Medieval Music Society published a collection of the solemn and simpler melodies to the antiphons. They follow the medieval melodies strictly and translate the text to fit the music. Generally quite well done but the opening of alma redemptoris sounds like the neighing of a horse.

The monastic diurnal noted also did the same thing and I think its adaptation is more satisfying.

My favourite, however, are the adaptations done by the Stanbrook nuns. The latin chants are re-written to fit the English texts while retaining familiar motifs. I haven't seen the music published but you can find a recording of the antiphons on their CD 'Compline and other chants' from 'Monks and Nuns of Prinknash and Stanbrook Abbeys'. They come at the end of the track titled 'Compline (English)'. The four antiphons are sung in succession. I downloaded that CD from emusic. It will be great if someone transcribes the music.

The simple melodies can also be found in Ford's 'By Flowing Waters'. The English translation is modern and natural sounding.

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Choirboy
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Less expensive than the Monastic Diurnal Noted - the Saint Dunstan's Psalter, also printed by Lancelot Andrewes Press, has the Marian antiphons in the back. These are the 'simplified' forms in the Monastic Diurnal Noted, which are mostly the tunes people are familiar with, I believe. Pricing is on their website, but I notice there is currently a steep discount for orders of 20 copies or more.
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dyfrig
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Has anyone come across a thing called "The Taize Office" which Faith Press seem to have published some time in the mid 60s?

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"He was wrong in the long run, but then, who isn't?" - Tony Judt

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