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Source: (consider it) Thread: Eccles: Daily Offices Redux
J.S. Bach
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quote:
Originally posted by John H:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
...this will be my last one for a while...
Blessings,
JSB

Famous last words.
Quite. You do realise, JSB, that this thread is actually a thinly-veiled online meeting of "Liturgoholics Anonymous"? [Smile]
Martin L and John H, you are so right! I justify it in my own mind by thinking that it is not wrong to spend money on something that furthers my relationship with God. It would be better on the pocketbook to slow down the purchases, however.

Mundelein and New Camaldoli's office books will bring my collection to 10. Some are successors to others (e.g., Common Worship: Daily Prayer vs. Celebrating Common Prayer). Others are starter offices (e.g., Durham Liturgy's Daily Prayer). At some point, I have prayed with every one of them.

Ever since going on a monastic retreat, I've wanted to chant the office regularly. I haven't found a breviary with a regimen I can keep (either the office is too long or the chant too difficult), so I'm hoping and praying that these latest offerings will help in my quest.

Blessings,
JSB

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
I haven't found a breviary with a regimen I can keep (either the office is too long or the chant too difficult), so I'm hoping and praying that these latest offerings will help in my quest.

This is my problem too. Specifically, I am not a morning person, but for work I must rise long before the sun for most of the year. I cannot do a long office justice, and instead tend to nod off in the middle. Unfortunately, most breviaries seem to keep the long content at the beginning of the day and the shorter stuff at the end. I'm not looking for a radical change, just a better balance and a more manageable Psalter cycle (60 or 90 days would be best for me). I keep gravitating back to the BCP79 offices, but frankly they are rather...utilitarian, shall we say?...and I lose my zeal as a result. As far as PBO, I've never been able to find a manageable price on one, but I sure keep my eyes open.
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
Ever since going on a monastic retreat, I've wanted to chant the office regularly. I haven't found a breviary with a regimen I can keep (either the office is too long or the chant too difficult), so I'm hoping and praying that these latest offerings will help in my quest.

I resonate. [Cool] And somewhere there is a perfect breviary. Wonder what that might look like:

  • A single volume containing all necessary texts
  • Complete music provided for each item, whether through musical notation or pointing as appropriate to the item
  • The favored translation of everything (in my case, the 1979 BCP psalms)
  • Strong connection to the official liturgy (office and Eucharist) of my church, conforming to its calendar
  • Flexible psalter schemas possible, meaning the psalter probably has to be presented contiguously as in the BCP rather than in order by office and day
  • Everything attractively and classically typeset in sufficiently large print and with plenty of white space
  • Book portable enough to take anywhere (having seasonal volumes, even four of them, is OK for this)
  • Minimal flippity, so each seasonal volume is going to be thickish (but portable!)
  • Many ribbon markers but no resulting breakdown of the spine
I'd better get to work on creating this, eh? [Snigger]
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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
I'd better get to work on creating this, eh? [Snigger]

[no snigger] Please do, and don't forget the patristic readings, the collects from LFF, the office hymns (with music, of course), and Psalm schemae for wimps (60, 90, 120, yea 150 days!)
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Please do, and don't forget the patristic readings, the collects from LFF, the office hymns (with music, of course), and Psalm schemae for wimps (60, 90, 120, yea 150 days!)

You know, as I review my list, it occurs to me that the closest thing is probably the Contemporary Office Book published by churchpub.org, cleansed from typos and divided into two yearly volumes and furnished with tones and pointing for chanting psalms, canticles, versicles and responses. Then I'd need to add the enrichments from Howard Galley's A Prayer Book Office including seasonal and holy-day antiphons, then hymns and tunes from the Saint Helena Breviary or the Monastic Diurnal Revised, and then we're cooking with gas.

Everyone should realize, by the way, that The Mundelein Psalter will give us a set of psalm tones that require minimal pointing, if any at all, and that we can see which tones Fr. Samuel appoints to each text in that psalter and use the same tones with our preferred translations. Or maybe we'll be thrilled with the translation used, as is. Just a couple of weeks more... [Yipee]

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Olaf
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After some gentle inquiries, I have managed to find out that a Daily Office book is a very likely possibility in the ELW "Constellation" of resources.

However, it does not seem that anything has been decided, or even envisioned. I imagine it would include the RCL Sunday-based office lectionary, and would probably maintain a minimalist approach to liturgy. Most breviary fans, myself included, would feel better if Phil Pfatteicher were involved in the process.
This page, which I discovered the other day, may or may not be of interest.

(The worst thing about most breviaries is that you just know one dominating person was the driving force behind them--be it an abbot, an abbess, Sr. Cintra.) How does one apply for such a position?!)

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
(The worst thing about most breviaries is that you just know one dominating person was the driving force behind them--be it an abbot, an abbess, Sr. Cintra.) How does one apply for such a position?!)

Indeed. I think being responsible for compiling a breviary would be just a truckload of fun. [Yipee] This page shows Sr. Cintra and two other nuns having a truckload of fun. Especially if I got good at Saint Meinrad psalm tones font. "Okay, let's use Tone VIIa for that one...[tappity tap tap]; done. On to the next antiphon..." [Cool]
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DitzySpike
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the sacrosancte with paps.
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PD
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I have also had difficulty finding an Office Book that I can use for any length of time.

The present RC Liturgy of the Hours is about the right length - about 50 to 60 minutes a day, and contains seven offices a day, patristic readings and a four week psalter - all desireable - but the language is banal. Also the fact that one can omit two of the lesser hours in a bad day is helpful. I usually last about a month on it before the translation catches up with me and I can endure it no longer. BTW, does anyone else hate those psalm prayers in the U.S. version?

The Divine Office, which - as you know - is the British, Irish and Aussie version of the modern Breviary, published by Collins is much better - apart from also using that damn Grail Psalter - but with USD - GBP exchange rate the way it is there is no way I can afford to buy it right now. As the Grail Psalter happens to be my major problem with the American version it might the Collins version may not be enough of an improvement to justify the expenditure.

The Anglican Breviary would be the best option for me provided that (a) I read it according to the 1960/67 Rules which cut out a lot of the duplications, and if (b) my parish did not have weekday offices which have to follow the BCP. On top of saying the BCP Office at least once a day the Anglican Breviary rapidly becomes too much. One advantage in my conservative parish is that the AB ties in nicely with the 1928/American Missal lectionary that we use.

The English Office is an oldie but a goodie. However, a lectionary required as the recent reprint hasn't one of its own. Nice two office book, but no patristic readings, and I do tend to get twitchy in the long gap between MP and EP.

The Prayer Book Office - the 1963 version is OK but idiocyncratic - again, no Patristic readings. My copy has ended up with the usual Marian Antiphons glued into it. I have never been able to get my paws on the Howard Galley version. Not much use to me as we use the older lectionary here.

In practice, over the last few years, I have tended to end up cobbling something together out of the BCP and the Anglican Breviary. I say Matins straight from the Breviary; Lauds and Vespers are either the forms given in the Breviary - but I substitute the BCP lectionary readings for those given in the Breviary, or the BCP forms with the psalms from the Breviary; the Lesser Hours are said catch as catch can; and Compline is straight Breviary. It usually takes me about an hour to recite that little lot. It works for me, but I think it would send 9 out of 10 other people nuts.

PD

[edit to replace text with corrected version per request of PD]

[ 30. April 2007, 19:17: Message edited by: jlg ]

--------------------
Roadkill on the Information Super Highway!

My Assorted Rantings - http://www.theoldhighchurchman.blogspot.com

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DitzySpike
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I'm in a crisis - things fall apart and the centre cannot hold!

Which breviary shall I use tomorrow?

(by the way, the camadolese website looks bugged. any more information? Nada at Liturgical Press)

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Extol
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I think it's entirely possible to design one's own breviary from scratch each day, for free, using the resources at hand on the Internet:

1. Ordinary and Psalter from one of the BCP sites (commonprayer.org, oremus, missionstclare, C of E site)

2. "Catholic options" as you prefer (antiphons to psalms and Gospel canticles, V/R and Office Hymn, and collects and commemorations of the day from breviary.net

3. Lectionaries galore (http://tinyurl.com/2nddb6, commonprayer, missionstclare)

4. Patristic readings from universalis or from http://tinyurl.com/2kebbz

5. Little hours from breviary.net or from http://tinyurl.com/yqege5

6. Marian antiphons from breviary.net

I tend to replicate the ENGLISH OFFICE by pasting the "Catholic options" from breviary.net and the 1922 Lectionary readings into the C of E's daily 1662 BCP feed. I read little hours from breviary.net when I get the chance.

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Wilfried
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quote:
The Anglican Breviary would be the best option for me provided that (a) I read it according to the 1960/67 Rules...
Where can one find a copy of these rules, and are they straight forward to apply to the Anglican Breviary as printed?

Also, how does one order the New Camaldoli office, and is there any info available about it online? Google was not my friend.

Thanks.

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Extol
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from http://www.camaldolese.com/news.htm :


Dear Oblate Friends,

Some wonderful news: our Camaldolese Office Book has been printed and the many boxes have now safely arrived at the Hermitage. We are offering the handsome volume at the non-profit price of $20, plus $5 mailing. If you are interested, just email bede@contemplation.com with your full address, and a Visa or Master Card number plus expiration date (as "04/09"). Or mail a check for $25 made out to "New Camaldoli Hermitage", and include your full address. Write "Office Book" on the envelope, and address it to:

New Camaldoli Hermitage
62475 Coast Highway One
Big Sur, CA 93920

This volume represents the first "event" of our Hermitage 50th Anniversary celebrations! We were founded in 1958, so this is an early, kind of vigil offering!

Further details about the book: it has been printed for us by Liturgical Press, is a handsome, strongly bound hard cover volume, and its official title is: Lauds and Vespers, Including Compline and Additional Acclamations. The covers are a rich burgandy color, with our logo inset on the cover. The book features three lovely colored ribbons! It includes a helpful Introduction by our Thomas Matus and Cyprian Consiglio. The text verses and music are easily legible, and the book is a comfortable size, 6 x 9 inches. We hope it can enrich your prayer life and bind you the closer to us at New Camaldoli and Incarnation Monastery--and also the Episcopal Mt. Calvary Retreat House, which has ordered 100 copies! It includes a hymn to Fr. James Otis Sargent Huntington, O.H.C.! If you can make it to the Hermitage here, or Incarnation Monastery in Berkeley, or Mt. Calvary in Santa Barbara, of course you will be able to buy the volume for just $20, saving the cost of mailing.

A special thanks to our Thomas and Cyprian and Bede and our former Peter Damian for their very hard work making this volume possible, and to Oblate volunteers, especially of our San Luis Obispo community, for helping with the Saturday mailings. Since we shall only be mailing once a week, please do not expect immediate delivery. Patience is a splendid Benedictine/Camaldolese virtue!

Please spread the word! And have a blessed Eastertide!

Fr. Robert

[ 30. April 2007, 19:45: Message edited by: lukacs ]

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John H
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quote:
Originally posted by PD:
The present RC Liturgy of the Hours is about the right length - about 50 to 60 minutes a day, and contains seven offices a day, patristic readings and a four week psalter - all desireable - but the language is banal ... I usually last about a month on it before the translation catches up with me and I can endure it no longer.

I know what you mean. I've been using the LOTH (UK, Collins edition) again for a few weeks now. MP and Compline only - I'm such a lightweight. [Biased]

I love the variety of material - both in the liturgy itself, and in additional touches such as the devotional poetry at the back - but the language is indeed pretty awful at times (the antiphon for the Nunc Dimittis is a particular travesty). Are there any plans to produce a new English translation a la the new Missal?

One other thing I enjoy about the LOTH compared with (say) CCP or CW:DP is the sense of it being an algorithm for generating worship. It's not as pretty to look at as CW:DP, and certainly not as simple to use, but once you've got the hang of it there is a wonderful dynamism to the service.

--------------------
"If you look upon ham and eggs and lust, you have already committed breakfast in your heart."

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DitzySpike
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It's a silly game here. Let's test out USPG's services. I've put in my order for the Camaldolese book. Let's see whose arrives first. First person do a show and tell at our next online Brevilitis Anonymous gathering.
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Ignatius' Acolyte
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Good luck to those getting a Camaldolese book!

Incidentally, author Robert Benson has done his own office-lite compilation. His target audience, it seems, are the kinds of people to whom I'd like to introduce the Office: Christians of a certain bent who realize that the "evangelical" way of praying (or lack of it) is inadequate as a way of prayer.
Here is the official site for the office.

I realize that for many of us here, this is but trainer wheels, but for a lot of others, it's necessary!

--------------------
Be a blessing.

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by PostDenominational Catholic:
I realize that for many of us here, this is but trainer wheels, but for a lot of others, it's necessary!

That website is interesting. You make a good point, and it's one that I frequently forget here.

For lurkers--Do not become dejected if praying a fixed office does not come natural to you. It is something with which many people struggle. Starting out with some of the books that have been discussed here would perhaps not be the best route. As one becomes accustomed to the "flow" of the offices, it becomes easier and easier to focus and to add extra elements such as antiphons and responsories. It also takes a really good set of ribbons or page markers!

(Then again, there are always those shining stars who can make anything a success on their first attempt!)

[ 03. May 2007, 21:29: Message edited by: Martin L ]

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John H
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Do not become dejected if praying a fixed office does not come natural to you. It is something with which many people struggle ... (Then again, there are always those shining stars who can make anything a success on their first attempt!)

This probably has to do with temperament to a large extent. Some people take naturally to extempore prayer or to meditation/contemplation, and may find the structured approach of the office uncongenial.

But other people - myself included - find the office a liberating experience after years of struggling with other, more individual forms of prayer and meditation. People in that situation may well find that they take to the office like ducks to water.

See, for example, this post by the blogger Michael Spencer (the "Internet Monk") in which he describes the contrast between liturgical prayer and the spiritual gymnastics of revivalistic "prayer warriors" of his own Southern Baptist tradition.

--------------------
"If you look upon ham and eggs and lust, you have already committed breakfast in your heart."

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Ignatius' Acolyte
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quote:
Originally posted by John H:
This probably has to do with temperament to a large extent. Some people take naturally to extempore prayer or to meditation/contemplation, and may find the structured approach of the office uncongenial.

But other people - myself included - find the office a liberating experience after years of struggling with other, more individual forms of prayer and meditation. People in that situation may well find that they take to the office like ducks to water.

See, for example, this post by the blogger Michael Spencer (the "Internet Monk") in which he describes the contrast between liturgical prayer and the spiritual gymnastics of revivalistic "prayer warriors" of his own Southern Baptist tradition.

Thanks for the link.

I do think that there are a lot of people out there, especially where I come from, who may really need a more structured liturgical (non-Eucharistic) prayer, and our churches, save very few, do not even have room for that!

In my case, I was discontented with the charismatic movement and with the laissez-faire approach Jesuits took to prayer and liturgical celebration. When I read the Taft book (a Jesuit writing favorably about structured prayer? Bravo!), that was when I decided to start trying to celebrate the office. That was six years ago.

I'm glad though that I found this thread, and indeed these boards. I realized that there is so much out there in the way of non-Eucharistic prayer that it seems more needs to be done for myself and for others too.

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Be a blessing.

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Adam.

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A question about LOTH (US Version; Christian Prayer if it matters). In the responsary after the reading, one of the lines is always written as "Glory to the Father, ...". I always assumed this was meant to be a a full "Glory be", but I've recently prayed it with two separate groups who have only gone as far as "and the Holy Spirit" and not done the "As it was...".

Is there any official rubrical guidance here that I'm missing?

--------------------
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Preaching blog

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Clavus
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Your assumption was wrong and your two groups were right. In the UK version, a fully worked example is given for the first office in the book (EP1 of Sundays in Advent), with a note that the Short Responsory is always said in this manner.
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Choirboy
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This was always the case in the responsories following readings. It is a bit confusing as the full Gloria Patri is used in the opening preces and after each psalm [at least in many offices].

I understand the way the responsory worked in communities is that the cantor said the first line, everyone repeated it [the doubled second line], the abbot or other top monk took the Gloria alone and then everyone repeated the first line again together. Anyone with more concrete information on this?

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Olaf
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Usually there is a verse or phrase which is said/sung and then echoed back by the "people." Then there is another verse or phrase, only it is not echoed back. Instead the "people" respond with either the entire first verse again, or more traditionally the second part of that first verse alone. Then the beginning of the Gloria Patri follows, and the "people" respond with the entire first verse once again.

Here is an example:

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.
You have redeemed us, Lord, God of faithfulness, alleluia, alleluia.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.

In this case, the only response of the "people" is the first verse.

In this next one, notice that the "people's" response to the second verse is only the last part of the first verse.

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.
You have redeemed us, Lord, God of faithfulness, alleluia, alleluia.
- I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit, alleluia, alleluia.

Anymore, it really seems to depend on the breviary and the whim of the person/group who wrote or compiled it. In my (admittedly limited) experience, I have never seen the full Gloria Patri used in a Responsory, only the first part followed by the first portion of the Responsory.

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Oblatus
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I've always been interested in the responsory form. One aspect of it is that it often takes two verses from very different parts of Scripture or liturgical tradition and juxtaposes them. It's sort of a brief group meditation on those bits.

Another aspect that's rather silly but goes through my head sometimes is the way the form seems like this:

Leader: Here's a sentence for you to repeat.
All: Yes, we like it and hereby repeat it.
Leader: And here's another bit to repeat.
All: No, we prefer the last half of the old bit.
Leader: How about finishing a Gloria Patri?
All: Nope; we're sticking with the first bit, so there.

OK, I have a warped mind sometimes. [Two face]

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Olaf
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[Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me]
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John H
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According to George Guiver in Company of Voices (which I'm reading at the moment - wonderful book), the responsory was originally a complete psalm, with the first versicle being used as a refrain. However, over time this shrank to its current form.

One particularly interesting point made by Guiver is that the form of the Gloria Patri pre-dates the Arian crisis, and that the "as it was in the beginning..." was a later addition to respond to Arianism. Hence the responsory preserves that older version of the Gloria Patri.

(See Guiver, p.160)

--------------------
"If you look upon ham and eggs and lust, you have already committed breakfast in your heart."

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jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
OK, I have a warped mind sometimes. [Two face]

You're not alone, Scott. I often find that sort of meditation undermining my prayer life.
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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
from http://www.camaldolese.com/news.htm :


Are the Camadoli Roman Catholic or Anglican? I can't really tell, and I've never heard of them.

Martin

PS Has anybody received his/her book yet?

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PD
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quote:
Originally posted by Wilfried:
quote:
The Anglican Breviary would be the best option for me provided that (a) I read it according to the 1960/67 Rules...
Where can one find a copy of these rules, and are they straight forward to apply to the Anglican Breviary as printed?

Thanks.

The 1960 Rubrics are available in a little book called "Learning the New Breviary" by a Fr. Hausmann S.J.. I think the file got uploaded onto the Divine Office site at yahoogroups, so you can have a nosey through it.

The 1967 modifications to the 1960 breviary are fairly simple and are contained in "Tres Abhinc Annos" which is on the documents page at the Adoramus site - the Reform of the Reform people I think their website is http://www.adoramus.org

The main changes in 1967 are that the Absolutions and Benedictions at Matins are suppressed in private recitation, as is re versicle and response at the end of each reading. The other important concession that that one may omit two of the three nocturns at Matins on Feast of the I & II class so that Matins consists of 3 lessons and three psalms on those days, rather than the old 9 and 9. There is also some guff about what to do with the psalms if you decide to read a longer scripture lesson than the one set at Lauds or Vespers. Otherwise it was business as usual.

PD

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PD
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DANG!

www.adoramus.org ain't the right place - you'll have to google it - preferably by document name. However

http://adoremus.org is

PD

[ 05. May 2007, 19:26: Message edited by: PD ]

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J.S. Bach
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
from http://www.camaldolese.com/news.htm :


Are the Camadoli Roman Catholic or Anglican? I can't really tell, and I've never heard of them.

Martin

PS Has anybody received his/her book yet?

They are Roman Catholic, having their roots in Italy. Check out the New Camaldoli Hermitage website for more information about them.

You can see an example of their chant notation on this Beliefnet page. It is quite easy to learn.

No book yet. [Frown]

Blessings,
JSB

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Nunc Dimittis
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A question:

As we all know, Good Little Anglican Clergypeople make certain promises to pray the Offices daily, preferably publically, for and with their people. Good Little Anglican Ordinands of course are eager to do the Right Thing™, and strive to practice this discipline in advance of the day they take their vows.

What happens when an Anglican clergyperson takes a holiday? Are Anglican clergy still expected to say the Offices while away in the Caribbean, or lounging about in a Swiss chalet?

Are the Offices part of role or identity?

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PD
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quote:
Originally posted by Nunc Dimittis:
A question:

What happens when an Anglican clergyperson takes a holiday? Are Anglican clergy still expected to say the Offices while away in the Caribbean, or lounging about in a Swiss chalet?

Are the Offices part of role or identity?

Reading the office is part of one's ministerial identity as a bishop, priest, or deacon, so the requirement to read the Office does not take a vacation. I dutifully pack along a BCP and Bible when I go on holiday. I do have to admit to leaving out the Lesser Hours when I am on vacation, but they are not of obligation to Anglican clerics anyway.

One little mystery that has never been solved to my satisfaction is whether TEC clerics are under obligation to read the Office or not. Older editions of the BCP refer to Daily MP and Daily EP, but there was no canonical requirement to read the Prayer Book Daily Office. Most old TEC priests I have talked to - they were ordained when the church was still officially PECUSA - said that the BCP gave the practice moral force, but stopped just short of mandating it.

PD

[ 07. May 2007, 03:54: Message edited by: PD ]

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Divine Office
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With regard to reading the office on holiday, an Anglo-Catholic priest friend of mine normally reads Mattins, Evensong and Compline from the Scottish Prayer Book of 1929 with the addition of a patristic reading from the rare Collegeville Book of Prayer and office hymns from the English Hymnal and English Office.

When on holiday he reads the basic offices from a combined edition of the Scottish Prayer Book with the Authorised Version of the bible, which I believe is no longer available. I believe he has read the office on various forms of transport whilst travelling, including trains (I once prayed Mattins with him on the GNER express from Glasgow!), plains, boats, and possibly even trams!!!

DIVINE OFFICE

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John H
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quote:
Originally posted by Divine Office:
(I once prayed Mattins with him on the GNER express from Glasgow!)

I hope you chanted the psalms and canticles. Any opportunity to use a spot of incense, or were you in a "no-smoking" carriage?

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"If you look upon ham and eggs and lust, you have already committed breakfast in your heart."

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Oblatus
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I wonder whether anyone has discovered The Expanded Daily Office. It's downloadable as a free PDF or purchase-able as a hardcover book. I'm always keen to see personal adaptations and enrichments of the Office. This looks like a worthy one, although I haven't worked out the psalter scheme yet: it covers 36 days; perhaps an individual just starts at the beginning, regardless of the calendar date, and prays through the psalter every 36 days from then on?
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Ignatius' Acolyte
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
I wonder whether anyone has discovered The Expanded Daily Office. It's downloadable as a free PDF or purchase-able as a hardcover book. I'm always keen to see personal adaptations and enrichments of the Office. This looks like a worthy one, although I haven't worked out the psalter scheme yet: it covers 36 days; perhaps an individual just starts at the beginning, regardless of the calendar date, and prays through the psalter every 36 days from then on?

Thanks for pointing it out, I've just downloaded it. Looks like an interesting adaptation, and, as the compiler admitted, is really intended for individual/small-group use. It might find use, for instance, in a retreat.

As for the psalter scheme, I think he is going for the classic BCP scheme, but thirty-six days? Sixty might make more sense. (Wait, that's close to the current American distribution, without variations!)

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Be a blessing.

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Extol
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Our moderator has seen fit to bump far more justifiably obscure threads than this warhorse, so:

Has anyone scored a copy of the Camaldolese office?

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
Our moderator has seen fit to bump far more justifiably obscure threads than this warhorse, so:

Has anyone scored a copy of the Camaldolese office?

I trust mine was shipped on Saturday (they're shipping once a week); if it went Media Mail rate, there's no telling when it will arrive. Perhaps today.

My heart leapt when the doorbell rang and I saw the UPS man outside, but alas, he brought only a picture frame my partner had ordered. Boring!

Should be getting The Mundelein Psalter an-y day now as well, it being "mid-May" in my book.

Scott, drumming fingers on the desk

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DitzySpike
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I didn't have anything charged to my credit card [Frown]
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
I didn't have anything charged to my credit card [Frown]

I do have a charge from New Camaldoli, so that's in process. Not sure of the Mundelein one from LTP...time to research. It's been a disappointing week in terms of what I got in the post and UPS. Also awaiting a sweepstakes prize (Palm Treo 700p).
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J.S. Bach
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Good idea to check the credit card. I saw a charge online. It is good to know they received my order (placed April 24). I was hoping to have the Camaldolese office book for Ascension Day. We'll see . . . .

The expected ship date for The Mundelein Psalter is May 15.

Blessings,
JSB

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
The expected ship date for The Mundelein Psalter is May 15.

And lo and behold, a charge has appeared today on my credit card from Liturgy Training Publications for the price of the psalter.

I shall now take a folding chair to the edge of the street and await the UPS man. Surely he'll stop here today. All together now:

Oh, oh, the Wells Fargo wagon is a-coming... [Yipee]

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DitzySpike
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mantrating: patience is a benedictine virtue... patience is a benedictine virtue. Sheesh... I can do a lectio based on this before I sleep. Good night!
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Quam Dilecta
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Last fall I attended a conference where the Mundelein Psalter was used. It struck me as as one of the best modern English versions of the Psalms, dignified and well-adapted to Gregorian chant.

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Blessd are they that dwell in thy house

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Quam Dilecta:
Last fall I attended a conference where the Mundelein Psalter was used. It struck me as as one of the best modern English versions of the Psalms, dignified and well-adapted to Gregorian chant.

There's another such conference soon.

Alas, no visit from UPS today. The postman left me a small packet containing...a mint-condition ASB 1980 With Psalter. Blubrics, blue cover, blue ribbon markers. Now I'm off to that thread to find out why I wanted one again. [Yipee]

Didn't spend much on it, either. [Axe murder]

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Olaf
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I looked at the conference page. Ss. Peter and Paul is a fairly big cathedral-sized church that for some reason really impresses me. It gives St. Raymond Cathedral in Joliet quite a run for its money.

I hear Bishop Sartain isn't very Vatican 2, unlike his predecessor.

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
I looked at the conference page. Ss. Peter and Paul is a fairly big cathedral-sized church that for some reason really impresses me. It gives St. Raymond Cathedral in Joliet quite a run for its money.

I hear Bishop Sartain isn't very Vatican 2, unlike his predecessor.

Oh, my apologies, I totally misunderstood the conference page. Ss. Peter and Paul in Naperville is a usual haunt of the Joliet Diocese bishops. I made the mistake of assuming, and you know what happens with that!

I should have looked at the date a little more carefully.

[ 16. May 2007, 01:47: Message edited by: Martin L ]

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The Scrumpmeister
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Ok. For a while I've been a Prime and Compline man, occasionally saying Vespers on Saturday evenings and Sundays. I have lately been trying to expand my use of the Office but I'm not quite accustomed to this and am in need of some concurrence help.

This evening, I have 1st Vespers of the Ascension (Solemnity) colliding with 2nd Vespers of the Invention of the Cross (Greater Feast). Ascension takes precedence and presumably I should make a commemoration of the Invention, but I'm not sure I know what that entails other than the use of the Invention Collect after that of the Ascension.

Help gratefully received. Many thanks.

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Saint Bertelin:
This evening, I have 1st Vespers of the Ascension (Solemnity) colliding with 2nd Vespers of the Invention of the Cross (Greater Feast).

I can't find Invention of the Cross on any of my calendars for today.
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