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Source: (consider it) Thread: Eccles: Daily Offices Redux
Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Mockingbird:
Isn't the Franciscan rite identical with the secular rite ? lauds beginning with psalms 93 and 100 for example--while the monastic rite is a separate, somewhat more rational construct ?

Right. And I just realized I should certainly know a Benedictine office, since I'm a Benedictine oblate and have a copy of the Rule of St. Benedict. [Roll Eyes]

So my real question is, what's an Augustinian office, and why would a BCP-based one be Augustinian?

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DitzySpike
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I wonder too. OHC was founded according to the Augustinian rules. Its proper liturgy reflects that. It sees itself now primarily Benedictine. A Monastic Breviary is characteristically Benedictine, since it draws heavily from Canon Winfred Douglas' work. The Anglican Office is more monastic than parochial; in fact it is so austere it has a Cistercian feel to it.

Looks like the New Grail Psalter is becoming the OSB-prefered text. I wish someone would bring back the ICEL Liturgical Psalter from the dead. It gets me through the psalms in almost half the time normally taken.

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
Looks like the New Grail Psalter is becoming the OSB-prefered text. I wish someone would bring back the ICEL Liturgical Psalter from the dead. It gets me through the psalms in almost half the time normally taken.

[Snigger] I snigger because this is true! St Meinrad Archabbey's oblate manual uses the ICEL psalter in its one-week office for oblates, probably to end-run the copyright trouble that using the Grail psalms would pose.

I'm probably most thoroughly steeped in the 1979 BCP psalter, though. I have a new appreciation for it after reading the preface to The Prayer Book Psalter Revised (1973), one of the final drafts before the ratification of the new BCP in 1976 and 1979. The Drafting Committee, which included poet W H Auden, "who served until his return to England required his resignation," had considered the Grail psalter of 1963, among other options, for the 1979 BCP psalter. A footnote (p. vi) reads:

quote:
...[T]he Grail version...[is an attempt] to reproduce in English the stress-patterns of Hebrew poetry, whether two or three or four stresses to the half-verse...Aside from the insistence of the frequently recurring stress, a monotonous effect occurs in reading aloud because of the brevity of the lines. The Hebrew ear seems to have found an alternation of three- and two-stress lines solemn and elegiac. The English ear demands a longer line--four stresses, at least, and preferably five.
On p. vii in the main text:

quote:
On the *continuum* which ranges from utilitarian, unstructured speech at one extreme, to strict metrical composition on the other, the Prayer Book Psalter must be characterized as prose rather than verse. Unlike the Hebrew text, there are no dominant metrical patterns. The lines are of varying length and there is a great variety of rhythms. However, whether by instinct or design, the Prayer Book Psalter is marked by recurrent rhythmic patterns at the mid-verse pauses and at the ends of verses (including, but not limited to, the classical *cursus*), which are of great assistance in reading, and which render it singable, both to plainsong and to Anglican chant, and also to new varieties of chant-forms now being developed.

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RCD
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I was trying to find some expanded hymns for Compline, preferably from an early period (so excluding hymns from the 1800-present unless they are English versions of older texts). The usual ones I use, from the RC Office, are 'Te lucis ante terminum' and 'Christe qui splendor et dies' (speaking of which does anyone know a nice CHANT for this?)

So what are the Compline hymns used in other offices, or which shipmates use at Compline?

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Spiffy
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Woah. When I went looking for references to the ICEL psalter, I found this page, with more psalter schemas than you can shake a stick at.

(I've been trying to use the OSH two-week schema, and I do like the way they have the psalms kind of organized so each hour has 'the people' talking to God, God's reply, and a hymn of praise, but I haven't settled into a stable enough Office recitation that I actually make it all the way completely through two weeks, plus I can't pray the Day Hours in a long form, due to the OTHER kind of office. I'm going to sift through this page and see what I can work out for meself.)

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RCD
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quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Woah. When I went looking for references to the ICEL psalter, I found this page, with more psalter schemas than you can shake a stick at.

It's fantastic site. Sadly not being updated now [Frown]

[ 27. September 2006, 17:17: Message edited by: RCD ]

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by RCD:
quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Woah. When I went looking for references to the ICEL psalter, I found this page, with more psalter schemas than you can shake a stick at.

It's fantastic site. Sadly not being updated now [Frown]
Theo Keller updated parts of it as late as June 2006. He's wonderful to correspond with, if you have new information or want to discuss what's there. Check here for the e-mail address.

[ 27. September 2006, 18:52: Message edited by: Scott Knitter ]

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Olaf
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Has anybody actually managed to make it through a full two-week cycle of the St. Helena Breviary without variation? It seems like way too much for working folk!
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Has anybody actually managed to make it through a full two-week cycle of the St. Helena Breviary without variation? It seems like way too much for working folk!

I think I have. But I work in a home office, so I have some flexibility. I probably haven't done it 100 percent, but close to that once or twice.
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Spiffy
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Has anybody actually managed to make it through a full two-week cycle of the St. Helena Breviary without variation? It seems like way too much for working folk!

'Spect the religious of the OSH have. I recall reading some obscure Lay Association of the Faithful's Rule of Life (I spend a lot of time Googling such things, because I am odd) which had their members reading the entire psalter in one week (Morning, Evening, and Compline) with the majority of the psalms at Morning. IIRC, they said MP should take an hour and a half at the minimum, more rightly two to 2.5 hours.

Sorry, I'm not cut out to be that holy.

[ 27. September 2006, 19:04: Message edited by: Spiffy da WonderSheep ]

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Olaf
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I'm sure the sisters have managed it; I should have specified that I meant the people here who use SHB!

Scott, you're fortunate to be in a circumstance of making your own hours. As Spiffy's post testifies, it seems like most breviaries tend to put the emphasis on the morning office and taper off at night. For those who must rise early and get off to work, this is impractical (although young people may agree with me while older ones may disagree!)

Also, the common half-hour lunch is too short to put decent effort into praying Diurnum. It makes most sense for me to use the time when I am not preoccupied with time at all--in the evening. Early in the morning, after being rousted prematurely from bed by the alarm clock, time goes too fast and I go too slow! This is where I struggle with monastic breviaries.

When I finish an 8-week cycle in the current breviary I am using, I will most likely start with SHB on a 6-to-8 week plan--using only one office's Psalms per day. I would like to increase the frequency of the offices, but I need some sort of office for lay people! When the new BCP/NRSV versions come out, I may just go to that. With my own customary, MP from BCP only takes 3-5 minutes. I wish I could say time is not a factor, but most days it is.

BTW, Spiffy, I suspect you are in good company here (no comments about the googling!)

[ 27. September 2006, 19:51: Message edited by: Martin L ]

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Olaf
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Warning breviary fanatics! Read with caution.


quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
When the new BCP/NRSV versions come out, I may just go to that.

Sorry for the double-post, but I just checked Amazon and they say that the combo versions are now available, but still give the release date of All Hallows' Eve. The last time I tried to order something before the official release date (the Lutheran Service Book), I received it within 24 hours. Now, to choose the cover material and the amount of money I want to spend!
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Spiffy
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Warning breviary fanatics! Read with caution.


quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
When the new BCP/NRSV versions come out, I may just go to that.

Sorry for the double-post, but I just checked Amazon and they say that the combo versions are now available, but still give the release date of All Hallows' Eve.
Powells.com says it was published August 06, but that all copies are backordered. I just called the main store and they told me they cannot give an ETA, although they think they're just waiting for stock from the publisher. I've gone ahead and ordered one (One-More-Breviary-Syndrome strikes again), I'll holler when they tell me to pick it up.

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Scott, you're fortunate to be in a circumstance of making your own hours. As Spiffy's post testifies, it seems like most breviaries tend to put the emphasis on the morning office and taper off at night. For those who must rise early and get off to work, this is impractical (although young people may agree with me while older ones may disagree!)

I don't want to give the impression I am disciplined with this at all. I probably did the full two-week OSH cycle while on vacation one year.

Today I haven't prayed yet at all, and it's 3.15pm. Some days I'll start with Matins at 2pm or so and catch up. Other days I'll pray the hours at appropriate times. There's this fantasy in my mind that some day I will have a lovely, perfectly equipped oratory (or a gorgeous church across the street) to which I shall faithfully go, four or five times a day, and fervently pray my monastic office. I'll keep that dream alive.

I'm currently using the Monastic Diurnal Revised, which definitely follows the pattern you mentioned of big morning office, then smaller ones. It conjoins a three-psalm, monthly-cycle Matins (in the tradition of the CSM's former Order of Matins book) with a two-psalm, weekly cycle Lauds. Then there's Terce, Sext, (no None) Vespers, and Compline. All with my favorite psalter, the 1979 BCP one.

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DitzySpike
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quote:
Originally posted by RCD:
I was trying to find some expanded hymns for Compline, preferably from an early period (so excluding hymns from the 1800-present unless they are English versions of older texts). The usual ones I use, from the RC Office, are 'Te lucis ante terminum' and 'Christe qui splendor et dies' (speaking of which does anyone know a nice CHANT for this?)

Compline has invariable texts because it is ideally said from memory. The Sarum use, however does provide a few hymns. Off memory there's Cultor Dei, 'Servant of God, remember'. The sequences sung at Mass are also used during compline IIRC on some days. Check out the English Hymnal .
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John H
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
The last time I tried to order something before the official release date (the Lutheran Service Book), I received it within 24 hours.

Could you PM me with a link to the Amazon listing for the LSB? I can't find it on there at the moment.

Thanks!

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by John H:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
The last time I tried to order something before the official release date (the Lutheran Service Book), I received it within 24 hours.

Could you PM me with a link to the Amazon listing for the LSB? I can't find it on there at the moment.

Thanks!

Oh, this may have confused others as well, so I apologize! I got my copy of LSB straight from the source-- Concordia Publishing. I am geographically rather close to them, so it would not take long to ship. Even still, I probably paid $8 American for shipping (which is probably about double what it could have been shipped at). It still appears to be unavailable from Amazon.

This may help with accurate searches, though. The ISBN for the normal pew edition is 0758612176. I have an order in from CPH for the Altar Book as well, but I have yet to receive that.

You should put together an order from your church with your pastor, organist, and any interested parties.

Sorry about the confusion!

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John H
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Martin L: Thanks for clearing that up. Our synod will probably put in a bulk order for the LSB, but this is likely to take some time. (We'll probably take delivery just as work commences on the next revision...)

I would order direct from CPH but their international shipping charges are horrific (typically rather more than the price of the book), hence I'm looking out for it on Amazon. The ISBN will prove very useful for that - thanks.

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"If you look upon ham and eggs and lust, you have already committed breakfast in your heart."

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by John H:
Our synod will probably put in a bulk order for the LSB, but this is likely to take some time. (We'll probably take delivery just as work commences on the next revision...)

I don't know how common this is in the old country, but around here it may be possible for a synod who was placing a large-ish order to negotiate a deal either on shipping or on the price of the item itself. If you are part of the ILC, the LCMS and CPH may be able to offer a good deal to its 'little sister' church. (Really I have no idea whether they could or couldn't, but such things do happen around here occasionally!)
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John H
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
quote:
Originally posted by John H:
Our synod will probably put in a bulk order for the LSB, but this is likely to take some time. (We'll probably take delivery just as work commences on the next revision...)

I don't know how common this is in the old country, but around here it may be possible for a synod who was placing a large-ish order to negotiate a deal either on shipping or on the price of the item itself. If you are part of the ILC, the LCMS and CPH may be able to offer a good deal to its 'little sister' church. (Really I have no idea whether they could or couldn't, but such things do happen around here occasionally!)
Yes, CPH were very good about offering a "bulk" discount on a couple of dozen copies of their recent edition of the Book of Concord. Plus we have members at US military bases so we occasionally use them as the postal destination as that saves a lot of money.

Which (ahem) leaves more money spare for buying breviaries, I guess, just to drag this back to the official thread topic. [Biased]

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"If you look upon ham and eggs and lust, you have already committed breakfast in your heart."

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Divine Office
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Got a copy of the new enlarged Lauds and Vespers today by Fr Peter Stravinskas which is published by Newman House Press. It contains Morning and Evening Prayer in Latin from the Liturgia Horarum with a parallel English translation (including some good translations of the office hymns) for Ordinary Time, the Christmas season, Advent, Lent, Holy Week and the Easter Season, along with a few major feasts such as The Sacred Heart and Christ the King.

It does not, however, have the propers for all of the remaining feasts and memorials in the Roman calendar. Hopefully a second volume may appear in due course with these, as well as perhaps the orders for the Office of Readings, Prayer during the Day and Compline.

DIVINE OFFICE

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J.S. Bach
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I recently picked up three "daily office" CDs:

Vespers & Compline - Monastic Choir of St. Peter's Abbey, Solesmes
Guard Us Sleeping (Compline) - Brothers of the Society of Saint John the Evangelist
An Oxford Evensong - Oxford Christ Church Cathedral Choir

I believe that one or two of these have been mentioned on the Ship before. All are excellent and give a good flavor of current monastic and Anglican offices. I'm using the first two CDs for a children's Sunday School class on monks.

Blessings,
J.S. Bach

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
I believe that one or two of these have been mentioned on the Ship before. All are excellent and give a good flavor of current monastic and Anglican offices. I'm using the first two CDs for a children's Sunday School class on monks.

This is a wonderful thing you're doing, JSB. You'll be introducing the children to something that changed my life when I was introduced to it. I hope it helps them discover some of the riches of the church's tradition of continual prayer. [Votive] [Votive] [Votive]
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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
I believe that one or two of these have been mentioned on the Ship before. All are excellent and give a good flavor of current monastic and Anglican offices. I'm using the first two CDs for a children's Sunday School class on monks.

This is a wonderful thing you're doing, JSB. You'll be introducing the children to something that changed my life when I was introduced to it. I hope it helps them discover some of the riches of the church's tradition of continual prayer. [Votive] [Votive] [Votive]
What a wonderful and appropriate lesson! The church continues to pray together even though we are no longer in the same building.
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Clavus
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The Newman House Press Lauds and Vespers (Latin-English) - Expanded Edition has arrived!
It's the same height (17.5cm) as the original Per Annum version, but wider (12cm) as well as thicker of course (4.2cm), with 1521 pages instead of 805. The font is smaller than the original. Like the original, it is a quality production in two colours with gold-blocked maroon covers and three ribbon markers.
The Expanded Edition includes the material for Advent, Christmastide, Lent and Holy Week, Eastertide, and Solemnities of the Lord (Trinity, Corpus Christi, Sacred Heart, and Christ the King) as well as the Ordinary, Four-week Psalter, and Proper of Time 'per annum'. There is no material for Feasts or Saints - maybe that will be another book.
The Expanded Edition suffers from the same strange editiorial choices concerning translations as the original. Some of the office hymn translations are paraphrases by Newman in quirky metres, even when better translations in the original Latin metre by John Mason Neale are readily available. The English version used for the psalms and canticles is the RSV (Catholic Edition). Well yes it is Catholic, and a fairly literal translation from the Hebrew - but that also means it doesn't work very well as an aid to understanding the Latin, which is what the Preface says it's there for. The RSV also don't include some verses which the Neo-Vulgate does - e.g. Week II Friday Lauds Canticle, which leaves three verses untranslated. It retains the second person singular ('thee' and 'thou' for God), but the editorial team's translation of the Preces does not.
Still, the new book supplies a gap at a reasonable price ($55, plus, in my case, $20 for shipping to the UK), and with the $25 original currently out of print I reckon lots of Shipmates will want it! It can be obtained from Newman House Press, 21 Fairview Avenue, Mt Pocono, PA 18344.

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Divine Office
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Clavus wrote:-

quote:
Still, the new book supplies a gap at a reasonable price ($55, plus, in my case, $20 for shipping to the UK), and with the $25 original currently out of print I reckon lots of Shipmates will want it!
As mentioned, I also have the expanded edition of Lauds and Vespers. In fact, I've just obtained a second copy to give to a friend as a Christmas present!!! I can throughly recommend it to all those who would like to try out the LOH in Latin with a translation at hand. The translations of the office hymns might also be used with the vernacular editions of the LOH used in the UK and the USA as an alternative to the ordinary hymns provided in these books.

Like Clavus, I'd love to see a second volume with the propers for all feasts and memorials. I'm also eagerly anticipating the reprint by Southwell Books of the 1961 Diurnal Romanum, which according to their website should be due at any time.

DIVINE OFFICE

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RCD
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quote:
Originally posted by Divine Office:
[QB]I'm also eagerly anticipating the reprint by Southwell Books of the 1961 Diurnal Romanum, which according to their website should be due at any time.

How will you use a 1961 Diurnal for the LotH?
The Internet archive has an old antiphonale diurnal (and a Vesperale) that you might want to check out- very comprehensive including the Little Office. The only things mssing will be those added from 1913-1958 which is not much. Only a few saints and Christ the King.

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Divine Office
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RCD wrote:-

quote:
How will you use a 1961 Diurnal for the LotH?

I would pray one or more of the "old" offices occasionally from the 1961 book as a change from the current LOH. I have a copy of the Anglican Breviary which I have used in the same way. For example, for several weeks I prayed Sunday Vespers from the AB as a change from the current LOH Vespers.

The LOH is my "default" office, which currently includes Morning Prayer in public in my local RC church and Evening Prayer said privately. However, I also like to experiment with other forms of office for personal use.

DIVINE OFFICE

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Boadicea Trott
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I`ve just found this , which might prove to be an interesting online resource for the LOTH.
It is based on Phyllis Tickle`s work, and can be customised to your own time zone .
I prayed it this morning and enjoyed it for a change [Smile]
Lots of articles etc on the site too.

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Pine Marten
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Thanks for that link, BT, I’ve just prayed through the Midday Office. As you say, many interesting articles to read and loads of other links.

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Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead. - Oscar Wilde

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DitzySpike
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Compline sung weekly from Minnesota Compline Choir. Download the services here .
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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
Compline sung weekly from Minnesota Compline Choir. Download the services here .

Very nice, thank you. Some great listening. Why the big pauses in the cantors' versicles, though, we wonder? Why multiple cantors, for that matter? Minor quibbles. [Votive]
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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
Very nice, thank you. Some great listening. Why the big pauses in the cantors' versicles, though, we wonder? Why multiple cantors, for that matter? Minor quibbles.

Bump!

Lutherans are not well-known for having preserved the tradition of choral offices throughout the centuries! This seems to be a conductor's peculiarity, though.

I'm trying to figure out how they managed to extend Compline into a 27 minute affair!

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quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Happy birthday to me!
Happy birthday to me!
I got a St. Helena Breviary,
Happy birthday to me!
[Big Grin]

Happy belated birthday Spiffy! Or is it a very merry unbirthday?

Anyway, now that you've had SHB for a while, do you like it?

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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Anyway, now that you've had SHB for a while, do you like it?

And there was silence in heaven. Spiffy, I for one await your review with bated breath!
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quote:
Like Clavus, I'd love to see a second volume [of the Newman House Press Lauds and Vespers (Latin-English) - Expanded Edition] with the propers for all feasts and memorials.
In the meantime, the Latin texts for the Office for the major feasts is available online at
this Polish liturgy site

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quote:
Originally posted by Clavus:
this Polish liturgy site

Splendid! Neatly formatted and complete. Hope they're working on the ferial and other days as well.

This site would make it easy to set up a chanted Latin Vespers on the eve or day of a feast: get the complete texts here, then look for chants.

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Spiffy
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Anyway, now that you've had SHB for a while, do you like it?

And there was silence in heaven. Spiffy, I for one await your review with bated breath!
*hands out breath mints*

Well, I've been using the SHB in my usual less-than-consistent manner for about a month now, and it's, well, okay. It had a pretty high learning curve for me (and I've prayed a breviary or three in my lifetime). The tricky part for me was getting around the ferial antiphons and hymns that were stuck in the middle of the office, and the commons, and then to the collect for the saint of the day. Heavy on the flippy factor.

The beautiful thing, however (imo), is the comprehensive number of saint days, with individualized collects. I like saints. They're cool.

I've never really been a fan of inclusive language (I break out in hives whenever someone says "In the Name of the Creator, Redeemer, and Sanctifier"), but in the SHB, it doesn't jar me quite as much as in other adaptations.

One of the introductory bits to the SHB mentions how everything in this book was actually prayed several times, and I think that the polish applied by the Sisters allows this breviary to shine.

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Well, I've been using the SHB in my usual less-than-consistent manner for about a month now, and it's, well, okay. It had a pretty high learning curve for me (and I've prayed a breviary or three in my lifetime).

I had a very hard time with the inclusive language, but it doesn't bother me much anymore. The book is thorough, but to use it easily requires five or six markers, IMO, so it is certainly flippy. I also find the two-week psalter to be daunting and the text in the monastic version to be a bit small. It can definitely be said that this is not for the beginner!

But honestly I would rather they had done several volumes and included the daily readings and the 'stories' of the commemorated people from LFF. It would reduce the book load!

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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
But honestly I would rather they had done several volumes and included the daily readings and the 'stories' of the commemorated people from LFF. It would reduce the book load!

You think this is big: I've seen photos of the OSH sisters praying from fat three-inch binders, which probably held basically the same material that's in the fat monastic edition. So much for holding the breviary in one's hands while praying. Actually, if one's book rack is high enough, that might be a good thing (to have empty hands).
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
You think this is big: I've seen photos of the OSH sisters praying from fat three-inch binders, which probably held basically the same material that's in the fat monastic edition. So much for holding the breviary in one's hands while praying. Actually, if one's book rack is high enough, that might be a good thing (to have empty hands).

I've often wondered if it would come to me using my own self-composed 3-inch binders! [Cool]

Seriously, though, I like variety and I look forward to changing breviaries every once in a while. It would be a shame to put one together and then not use it often.

I'm sure this thread or its parent has discussed office posture, but is holding the book in one's hands the 'right' thing to do?

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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
I'm sure this thread or its parent has discussed office posture, but is holding the book in one's hands the 'right' thing to do?

I don't know whether there's a right and wrong to this. The Anglican Breviary is the only book I've seen that says anything about it: something about how when praying the office in choir, the book is not to be picked up until the preparatory (double or triple) prayers are finished and the superior gives a signal (bangs a gavel, usually) to stand erect and turn to the altar for the opening versicles. With all the flippity involved in that book, it pretty much needs to be in hand most of the time.
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:

I'm sure this thread or its parent has discussed office posture, but is holding the book in one's hands the 'right' thing to do?

Welp, I dunno if it's right or not, but usually when I am praying it's prone, under blankets, with one eye propped open and the book balanced between the pillow and the wall.

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John H
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quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:

I'm sure this thread or its parent has discussed office posture, but is holding the book in one's hands the 'right' thing to do?

Welp, I dunno if it's right or not, but usually when I am praying it's prone, under blankets, with one eye propped open and the book balanced between the pillow and the wall.
How about slumped in a coffee shop with the book on the table and my head on my forehead to keep vaguely upright? (And no, I wasn't hungover [Smile] )

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Olaf
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Thanks for satisfying my curiosity, Scott, Spiffy, and John. I know it wasn't the most intelligent of questions, but I suspected at least one breviary had some comment about how to hold it. Now kindly allow me to wallow in the ego burst that I just received when my suspicion was confirmed.

Our next endeavour--thinking up another marginally interesting topic to keep this thread on page 1!

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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Our next endeavour--thinking up another marginally interesting topic to keep this thread on page 1!

Well, I'm thinking of using part of my birthday (and day off [Yipee] ) tomorrow working on The Perfect Breviary for a Benedictine Oblate Bent on Praying All the Psalms in a Week But With Only One Little Hour, and Based on Thesaurus Liturgiae Horarum Monasticae Schema A. Basically, it would be something like this:

Vigils - two nocturns, streamlined (no antiphons or responsories, absolutions or benedictions); the BCP 1979 first lesson and the patristic lesson for the day from Readings for the Daily Office From the Early Church.

Lauds, Sext, Vespers, and Compline according to the structure of the Day Hours of St Gregory's Abbey but using the 1979 psalter, NRSV for readings, and various sources for the hymns. The remaining two BCP lessons read at Lauds and Vespers.

The old Prime psalms are used as "waiting psalms" immediately after the opening versicle and response at Vigils; psalms for Sext plow through Ps. 119 Sunday through Thursday and the short psalms 120-129 (I think) on Friday and Saturday.

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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
Well, I'm thinking of using part of my birthday (and day off [Yipee] ) tomorrow working on The Perfect Breviary for a Benedictine Oblate Bent on Praying All the Psalms in a Week But With Only One Little Hour, and Based on Thesaurus Liturgiae Horarum Monasticae Schema A. Basically, it would be something like this:

But now I'm thinking of just being satisfied with my Monastic Diurnal Revised with its monthly psalter cycle. My plan involves too many books, and too much work to make it one book. The MDR requires only my Daily Office Book (just for the lessons) to be complete. [Cool]
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
Well, I'm thinking of using part of my birthday (and day off) tomorrow working on The Perfect Breviary...

[Disappointed] Now, you know very well there is no such thing as the Perfect breviary!

I too enjoy holidays as a chance to spend more time with the office. Once upon a time, when I finally developed my (unwritten) customary for daily office, I decided that I simply did not have time to do all the gestures, postures, psalms, collects, chants, hymns, and canticles that I wanted to do every day.

Instead, I save such elements for solemn and festive occasions. It has become something I happily anticipate. Having concrete expectations without a permanent commitment to a certain text also keeps me from developing a case of office overload! [Big Grin]

Have you ever tried using the 30 day 1979 Psalter and just using as many psalms as you feel per day, without commitment to the scheduling? (& basically just resting the marker where you end)

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This lesson was read at Evening Prayer in our church today, and in my prayer-scatteredness, this came as a gift:

From a letter to Proba by St Augustine

Let us always desire the happy life from the Lord God and always pray for it. But for this very reason we turn our mind to the task of prayer at appointed hours, since that desire grows lukewarm, so to speak, from our involvement in other concerns and occupations. We remind ourselves through the words of prayer to focus our attention on the object of our desire; otherwise, the desire that began to grow lukewarm may grow chill altogether and may be totally extinguished unless it is repeatedly stirred into flame.

[Votive] [Votive] [Votive]

[ 18. October 2006, 02:53: Message edited by: Scott Knitter ]

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
This lesson was read at Evening Prayer in our church today, and in my prayer-scatteredness, this came as a gift:

From a letter to Proba by St Augustine

Let us always desire the happy life from the Lord God and always pray for it. But for this very reason we turn our mind to the task of prayer at appointed hours, since that desire grows lukewarm, so to speak, from our involvement in other concerns and occupations. We remind ourselves through the words of prayer to focus our attention on the object of our desire; otherwise, the desire that began to grow lukewarm may grow chill altogether and may be totally extinguished unless it is repeatedly stirred into flame.

[Votive] [Votive] [Votive]

An awesome reading! Happy birthday to you! [Big Grin]

Martin

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