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Source: (consider it) Thread: Eccles: Daily Offices Redux
Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
I always have trouble with the Invitatory Antiphon at Morning Prayer. In my Lutheran tradition, the leader says his/her part, then everyone responds the "O come let us worship him" part. When visiting spoken MPs at Episcopal churches, I usually get a comical glance when I respond with the part after the : by accident.

Typically, I just go with the flow and do whatever is appropriate to me--unison for invitatory and canticles, verse-by-verse alternation for the psalms, join in with the General Thanksgiving or Prayer of St. John Chrysostom (when used). I've never been booed out of the daily office before (to my knowledge).

You would be in good company at Ascension, Chicago: that's how we do the Invitatory (officiant says first/proper half of refrain; people join in second, invariable half). Officiant says first line of invitatory psalm; all join in the rest of it in unison. Then the alternation again on the refrain after the Gloria Patri.
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Olaf
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It doesn't ever worry me because I know there are many different schools of thought on the topic. There are seemingly as many local customaries as there are parishes!

Just because a specific leader chooses one way does not necessarily make it the 'right' way. My way, on the other hand, is invariably the 'right' way. [Biased]

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J.S. Bach
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
JS Bach, have you obtained your copy of St. Helena Breviary yet?

I've been away on business travel the past week but am sending my letter and check to the Vails Gate convent this weekend. I hope to be chanting by Christmas!

Blessings,
J.S. Bach

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
JS Bach, have you obtained your copy of St. Helena Breviary yet?

I've been away on business travel the past week but am sending my letter and check to the Vails Gate convent this weekend. I hope to be chanting by Christmas!
I'm chanting the Office of the Dead from the OSH Breviary today, as we learned this morning of the very unexpected death of one of our acolytes.
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Olaf
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Sorry to hear about the acolyte, Scott.

You've probably mentioned this before, but I can't recall the answer. What breviary does your next door group of sisters use?

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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
You've probably mentioned this before, but I can't recall the answer. What breviary does your next door group of sisters use?

The Order of St Anne use The Monastic Diurnal Revised in their convent between the church and the rectory. They have a cozy upstairs chapel with traditional choir stalls and a small altar that is no longer used (the Blessed Sacrament is reserved and Masses said only at the Church of the Ascension now). They pray Matins/Lauds from the MDR at 6:30 a.m. and go into the church for 7 a.m. Mass daily, 8 on Sundays. Not sure of the rest of the office times, but they're at times appropriate to each office (no aggregations, and I don't think they skip offices).
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Olaf
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Maybe I shouldn't have asked. Now I'm jealous. Where's the green-eyed smilie when you need him?

I've always wanted a deaconess (in habit, of course) to minister to our own parish, but we probably can't afford one. Still, many Lutheran deaconesses assume the traditional diaconal function at the Holy Communion, so it's not like she would just sit in the congregation.

Back to the topic of the offices, though, I worshipped once at a beautiful upstairs (4 long stairways and interminable corridors of polished floors) convent chapel that seats approximately 200, but was robbed of its kneelers post-Vatican II. Still, it was a remarkable experience. (It had beautiful stained glass and a pipe organ in a small fifth floor gallery!)

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RCD
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What are the relative merits/demerits of "Cathedral" and "Monastic" Offices?

And also, what type of Office do people prefer? No "extras" (antiphons, versicles, responsories, etc.) like the 1662 BCP? A weekly, biweekly (is that the correct phrase?) or monthly psalter? For example, my ideal version of Lauds would be only 1 or 2 variable psalms, a variable Canticle and 148-150 and 66(maybe as an Invitatory if one has a separate Matins and uses the "Venite" for that) said daily. And an invariable Compline. But some people find repetition of psalmody a bit tiresome (although there would be variation in other parts like a responsory, capitulum, litanic prayer and collect).

One last thing: I like hymns but I'm not sure whether it's a bit superfluous to sing a hymn after an Invitatory Psalm? Maybe it's my Puritan side coming out.

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J.S. Bach
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quote:
Originally posted by RCD:
And also, what type of Office do people prefer?

After praying the daily office for about 8 years now, I have come to enjoy the "extras." I started out with Celebrating Common Prayer (the 1992 blue book), which seems to have started the nice trend towards using many canticles. Last year, I encountered psalm antiphons for the first time in Benedictine Daily Prayer, and they are great when reciting the office with another person who does not have the book. My mother and I prayed vespers together during the last 7 months of her life (she passed away in February), and we would take turns reciting psalms and the Magnificat and would join together on the antiphons. It is a memory I treasure, and I look for antiphons in any new office book I purchase. I've been using Common Worship: Daily Prayer since June, where antiphons are called refrains, but the principle is similar.

Not being an expert, I suppose that CCP and CW:DP are "Cathedral" style offices, while BDP is certainly in the "Monastic" style. I like all three books (especially CW:DP), but the Benedictine book doesn't use all the psalms and only provides at most a 2-week cycle (for vigils and lauds only). The repetition gets to me after a while.

My next step is adding chant, and I have sent away for The Saint Helena Breviary: Monastic Edition, which has a four-fold office and a 2-week psalter covering all 150 psalms. I plan to split the psalms into a 4-week cycle because I'm not a monk and can't devote that much time to the office with the other office demands. I'm not sure what I'll do about the Diurnum (day) office; perhaps I'll photocopy the pages and make a mini-breviary to take to work!

JSB

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Olaf
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I'm an office flip-flopper. I like to use one breviary for whatever cycle it uses. For instance, if the Psalter cycle is four weeks, then I use it for four weeks and move on to something else. However, I prefer to stick to one for a season like Advent or Lent.

My tendency is toward the cathedral office, probably because the Lutheran office resembles it more than anything. I do like the stark simplicity of a US '79 office, though, which tends more toward monastic. I do use seasonal or diurnal options, but I only use hymns where specific hymns are provided in-text (so none with '79 and none with LBW).

As for St. Helena Breviary, it's tough to split the Psalms when using the monastic edition because of uneven distribution. If time is a concern, JS Bach, commit to one office a day and do the best you can with times.

  • Morning Prayer before work (about 15 min. spoken)
  • Diurnum when you arrive home for the day (under 10 min. spoken)
  • Vespers after Supper (about 10 to 15 min. spoken)
  • Compline before bed (under 10 min. spoken)
The lessons used make a difference, of course.
SHB is definitely written for career pray-ers, but it's well worth the effort!

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
I started out with Celebrating Common Prayer (the 1992 blue book), which seems to have started the nice trend towards using many canticles.

The 1992 CCP contains an excellent example of a "cathedral" office in its simple services that occupy a few pages, with drawings, in the middle of the book somewhere. George Guiver CR points this out in the latest edition of his excellent book Company of Voices. He cites a parish that has used these simple services for years.

The services are laid out in booklets, with several people taking leading roles (leader, psalm reader, canticle reader, perhaps song leader). Everyone arrives, picks up their office books, and easily finds what is needed for that day's office. Psalms are on a four-week cycle but come nowhere near covering all the psalms. It's meant to be easy to catch on to, appropriate for the time of day, and allowing lots of time for silent or spontaneous intercessory prayer.

On my own, I prefer a monastic office that has some systematic way of getting through the whole psalter. My ideal is to pray the psalter in a week using a monastic psalter schedule such as that given by St Benedict, but I think to do that I'd have to give up some of the extras and put together a psalter with everything in order to minimize flippity. I think I might also minimize seasonal and sanctoral observances so I can use the same single book throughout the year. There are some tradeoffs.

My spiritual director suggested I compile my own breviary, and I have some vacation time that will let me get a good start (or even finish). I think I'll start by arranging the psalter in order according to a monastic psalm schedule, from the first psalm on Saturday evening through the last one on Saturday at midday (a lot of breviaries seem not to do that, preferring to group all the lauds psalms for the week, then all the midday, etc.).

Stripping the office down to the psalter and then enriching it gradually might be just the ticket. I've been not praying the office at all. If I have my one book with one ribbon and stop four times a day to pray the next batch of psalms, I'll be in tune with monastics all over the world and won't be flipping pages and giving up. [Votive] [Angel] [Votive]

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
I've been not praying the office at all.

[Eek!] Scott, I'm surprised! Is Howard Galley's PBO not good enough? [Biased]

Is there something in particular that keeps you from saying the offices--the time commitment, the book juggling, deciding on propers and precedences, the lectionary, premature senior moments?

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Spiffy
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I have a question: what are the rules about combining major offices (e.g. Vespers and Compline)? And then, what do people really do?

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Is there something in particular that keeps you from saying the offices--the time commitment, the book juggling, deciding on propers and precedences, the lectionary, premature senior moments?

Most of those at one time or another. On work days, even though I work at home, there's a point in the morning (8:30) when if I haven't prayed a morning office, it won't happen that day. Problem is, before that I'm groggy and sometimes a prisoner of a longstanding morning routine. Fixable, yes, but not easily.

Then there's often a general malaise about getting bored or sleepy, not deciding which office to use, or yes, a bit of boredom. Sometimes I wonder whether I have adult ADD, or ADHD, or whatever they're calling it now. Just a bit of scatteredness, probably. Maybe if I stop reading about lectio and centering prayer and get doing it, I'll find more centered prayer time.

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DitzySpike
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
Maybe if I stop reading about lectio and centering prayer and get doing it, I'll find more centered prayer time.

Seriously, go for it [Smile]
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John H
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I find my own "tastes" tend to oscillate over the weeks/months. At times I find the variety of material in CW:DP or CDP more helpful. At the moment, it is precisely the combination of regular structure and systematic psalmody that I am finding appealing about the prayer book.

At other times, I am simply so exhausted that I fall back on the bare minimum, which for me is my daily Bible reading bookended by Luther's morning prayers from the small catechism: invocation, creed, Bible reading, Lord's prayer, closing prayer, finish coffee, get to work...

--------------------
"If you look upon ham and eggs and lust, you have already committed breakfast in your heart."

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
Maybe if I stop reading about lectio and centering prayer and get doing it, I'll find more centered prayer time.

Seriously, go for it [Smile]
Sounds like a good plan for Advent. Perhaps saying "I'm not going to bed at night until I've prayed Compline" would be a way to start.

Personally, I've found that praying the Psalms quickly helps to keep me focused. The longer I try to drag it out, the more wandering my thoughts become. I typically don't use any music, and keep the collects to three at the most, on a strictly regimental routine.

Not being a morning person, I can sympathize on the issue of Matins. Monastic offices are very Psalm-heavy in the morning, and it's frustrating to keep focused. Honestly, the only way around it that I've found is to do a short office in the morning involving only one invitatory Psalm. If I've said Venite or Jubilate, then I move on to the lesson (note the singular).

I think the office structure and times should reflect one's own sitz im leben. For most of us, that means something other than monastic routine.

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DitzySpike
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quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Sounds like a good plan for Advent. Perhaps saying "I'm not going to bed at night until I've prayed Compline" would be a way to start.

nah... when its time to move on to other forms of prayer, move on. You'll know when it comes that its not a matter of ill discipline, but a yearning for another means of union with God.
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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by DitzySpike:
quote:
Originally posted by Martin L:
Sounds like a good plan for Advent. Perhaps saying "I'm not going to bed at night until I've prayed Compline" would be a way to start.

nah... when its time to move on to other forms of prayer, move on. You'll know when it comes that its not a matter of ill discipline, but a yearning for another means of union with God.
Good point, I always go to bed within the Compline window-of-opportunity, but perhaps that's not the case for everybody.

What I was trying to say was that it has been good for me to attach the saying of an office into my regular routine. It was the initial step that helped me into a more regular pattern.

Some would argue that it's better to start with a morning office, before the changes and chances of life have flooded one's head with concerns. But for me, in the morning my head is groggy but also very concerned about the activities of the upcoming day. Also, I start work very early!

It works better for me to know that I have as much time as I need to pray the office and that the concerns of the day are done, to be followed with hours of wonderful rest. The New Zealand Prayer book says it best--what is done is done, what is not done is not done, let it be.

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dj_ordinaire
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For Advent, I've decided to kick-start my prayer-life in a rather more disciplined manner, to which end I've purchased a volume of Benedictine Daily Prayer. I'm finding it very useful to have everything in a single volume, and the use of the NRSV for the Psalms and Canticles feels fresh and simple - I think I like it. [Smile]

--------------------
Flinging wide the gates...

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by dj_ordinaire:
For Advent, I've decided to kick-start my prayer-life in a rather more disciplined manner, to which end I've purchased a volume of Benedictine Daily Prayer. I'm finding it very useful to have everything in a single volume, and the use of the NRSV for the Psalms and Canticles feels fresh and simple - I think I like it. [Smile]

BDP is 60 percent off today only at Liturgical Press if you enter 12DEAL01 as the discount code at checkout. Just passing the news along (I don't have any vested interest). Looks like the book plus tax and shipping is less than US$30.
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Extol
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Scott, thanks so much. I just ordered BDP at the discount. *winks and gives you the six-shooter hands*
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Spiffy
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Other than 'one-more-breviary syndrome', why should I pick up a copy of the BDP?

(I wants it, precioussss-- my bank account needs convincing [I'll have to pay for BDP out of my comic books fund])

--------------------
Looking for a simple solution to all life's problems? We are proud to present obstinate denial. Accept no substitute. Accept nothing.
--Night Vale Radio Twitter Account

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Other than 'one-more-breviary syndrome', why should I pick up a copy of the BDP?

Nicely bound, handy size, everything in one book, modern materials in Benedictine office structure. Wish it used all 150 psalms, though. That's my only negative about it.
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jlg

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I succumbed to "One-more-breviary" syndrome and then went straight to "Oh, the money I saved will pay for X!" and ended up buying a few more things. [Hot and Hormonal] I should never be let loose with a credit card near large quantities of books and music scores. I suppose this means I should get out my copy of Divine Hours for Dodos and spend Advent learning how to actually say Compline and MP without having to consult the cheatsheets.
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Spiffy
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I decided to exercise fiscal stewardship and forego the BDP this go-around. I've just finished jury-rigging a system guaranteed to get me to pray more through Advent (involving the OSH on my nightstand, a link to The Lectionary on my work and home computer, and the BCP/NRSV in my messenger bag). Throwing another book in the mix right now would be A Very Bad Idea.

Maybe after Christmastide.

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Looking for a simple solution to all life's problems? We are proud to present obstinate denial. Accept no substitute. Accept nothing.
--Night Vale Radio Twitter Account

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
I decided to exercise fiscal stewardship and forego the BDP this go-around.

You go, Spiffy! Then there may be a cure for breviaryitis after all.

I find BDP to be a little complicated for the layperson, if you try to fit in everything.

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Spiffy
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Ah, yes, the cure for breviaryitis is emptywalletus.

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Looking for a simple solution to all life's problems? We are proud to present obstinate denial. Accept no substitute. Accept nothing.
--Night Vale Radio Twitter Account

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J.S. Bach
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quote:
Originally posted by RCD:
quote:
Originally posted by J.S. Bach:
Another chant-based office book in the works is The Mundelein Psalter, based on the current RC Liturgy of the Hours. From a phone conversation with a very nice lady at Mundelein’s Liturgical Institute and Internet searches, this book sounds promising. Apparently it will have 1,200 pages but is designed to be held in the hand (4 x 7 inches). Expected publication date is February 2007. I got on the mailing list for ordering information when that becomes available.

Any idea what a rough price range might be?
I asked about getting a price on the book, even an estimate, but the lady said something about them still deciding what it would be. I expect to see a price in the mailing and will post details once it arrives.

No mailing has materialized yet, but prepublication ordering information for The Mundelein Psalter is now available on the Liturgy Training Publications website. The prepublication price for up to 24 copies is $40 each (retail price will be $50). The physical dimensions seem to have grown to 6 x 9 inches, about the same size as The Saint Helena Breviary, Monastic Edition I recently ordered (anxiously awaiting its arrival).

Blessings,
JSB

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Ricardus Sacerdos
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You may be interested in the Franciscan Office Book. This is the official office of the Franciscan Order of the Sacred Heart (FSC).
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Hilda of Whitby
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I'm getting nibbles of curiosity about the St. Helena's Breviary. Could those of you who use it tell me more about it?

My current daily office book is the 2 volume ECUSA daily office. I like it a lot (except that the quality control on the printing leaves a lot to be desired--lines across pages, etc.). I am not nearly as dedicated as many of you are, so I am not looking for anything complicated. I generally read an abbreviated Morning Prayer and the lectionary readings; before bed I read the Compline service (and the lectionary readings if I didn't read them in the morning.)

I was wondering (a) how hard it is to use the St. Helena's Breviary (b) how close it is to the BCP and (c) how graceful the prose is.

Thanks very much,

Hilda

PS Oh, and any info/opinions on the St. Helena's Psalter would be appreciated as well. Much as I hate to admit it, the Psalms are my least-favorite part of the Daily Office!! Maybe I just don't like poetry? I was thinking (hoping) that a different translation might help me get over my aversion to reading Psalms.

--------------------
"Born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad."

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Hilda of Whitby:
I'm getting nibbles of curiosity about the St. Helena's Breviary. Could those of you who use it tell me more about it?

The SHB is in the tradition of the Order of the Holy Cross (OHC) volume, A Monastic Breviary. As such, it's the 1979 BCP office materials enhanced with antiphons, responds, hymns, and proper material. It uses a two-week psalter distribution across four daily offices.

While I think the SHB is wonderfully done (especially the monastic edition, which incorporates the chant that the OHC book lacked and was in a separate unpublished volume), I think you'd find two problems with it: (1) complexity, as the SHB does require a good bit of flipping back and forth between the psalter and the seasonal and sanctoral materials; and (2) the amount of psalmody at each office, especially Matins and Vespers.

The St Helena Psalter is based on the 1979 BCP one and sticks quite closely to it but inclusivizes the language. It does this in a most sensitive and skillful way, unlike some other clunky attempts. The sisters put much time and thought (and prayer!) into all of this work. Very intelligently done.

You might want to check the Grail psalter or the out-of-print ICEL psalter for psalms that are easier to handle: much more compactly rendered, especially the ICEL. Doesn't hurt to change psalter translations to keep one's daily office fresh. Also try the psalms as given in various Bible translations. Some of these may be better for individual reading than the ones in liturgical books, which are designed for group recitation and singing.

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Lou Poulain
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I just received my copy of the SHB personal edition a few of weeks ago and began using it to pray Matins. It took me a week to get used to the format, but once I got that figured out, I have come to really like this breviary. I also bought a copy of Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2003 and on commemoration days I read the short biography and collect after the Benedictus and before the creed.

I think the psalms and canticles are beautifully done.

Lou

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Spiffy
Ship's WonderSheep
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quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus Sacerdos:
You may be interested in the Franciscan Office Book. This is the official office of the Franciscan Order of the Sacred Heart (FSC).

Hi Ricardus!

Welcome to the Ship! Someone more important than I will probably wander past and greet you properly, but I got here first. Neener. [Big Grin]

I stumbled across that a couple days back and stuck that link on my del.icio.us page for further perusal, but hadn't had much of a chance with the American holidays. I'll be sure to take a look when I get a chance today, thanks for the reminder!

--------------------
Looking for a simple solution to all life's problems? We are proud to present obstinate denial. Accept no substitute. Accept nothing.
--Night Vale Radio Twitter Account

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Mockingbird

Mimus polyglottos navis
# 5818

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Here is someone with many gripes about the post-Vatican-II Liturgy of the Hours.

--------------------
Forþon we sealon efestan þas Easterlican þing to asmeagenne and to gehealdanne, þaet we magon cuman to þam Easterlican daege, þe aa byð, mid fullum glaedscipe and wynsumnysse and ecere blisse.

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Extol
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# 11865

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Can someone who uses the '79 BCP in public recitation let me know what your parish's custom is for the reading of Lessons? Specifically, how do you handle the reading of three lessons in a form seemingly designed for two per hour? OT and Epistle at Mattins and OT and Gospel at Evensong? Thanks as always--
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dj_ordinaire
Host
# 4643

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quote:
Originally posted by Mockingbird:
Here is someone with many gripes about the post-Vatican-II Liturgy of the Hours.

... principally that it's not the pre-Vatican-II liturgy, it seems...

--------------------
Flinging wide the gates...

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
Can someone who uses the '79 BCP in public recitation let me know what your parish's custom is for the reading of Lessons? Specifically, how do you handle the reading of three lessons in a form seemingly designed for two per hour? OT and Epistle at Mattins and OT and Gospel at Evensong? Thanks as always--

At Ascension, Chicago, we do it thus:

In Year 1 of the Daily Office Lectionary (which will begin on Advent Sunday):

MORNING PRAYER
1. Old Testament Lesson
2. Epistle, or Acts, or Revelation (middle lesson)

EVENING PRAYER
1. Gospel Lesson
2. Patristic Lesson from Readings for the Daily Office From the Early Church

In Year 2 of the Daily Office Lectionary (which will end this Saturday):

MORNING PRAYER
1. Old Testament Lesson
2. Gospel Lesson

EVENING PRAYER
1. Epistle, or Acts, or Revelation (middle lesson)
2. Patristic Lesson from Readings for the Daily Office From the Early Church

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dj_ordinaire
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quote:
Originally posted by Scott Knitter:
quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Other than 'one-more-breviary syndrome', why should I pick up a copy of the BDP?

Nicely bound, handy size, everything in one book, modern materials in Benedictine office structure. Wish it used all 150 psalms, though. That's my only negative about it.
Yes, my only gripe is that the psalter is incomplete. On the other hand, when I was following an order which went through the whole psalter I found I was truncating it anyway, so maybe being slightly less ambitious is all for to the good.

--------------------
Flinging wide the gates...

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Mockingbird

Mimus polyglottos navis
# 5818

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quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
Can someone who uses the '79 BCP in public recitation let me know what your parish's custom is for the reading of Lessons?

When I was in the rota for saying Evening Prayer at the university chapel, we simply took the 3 lessons from the offfice lectionary for the day (p. 936ff). The creed followed the third lesson.

Saying only two lessons would have been trickier, because we would have had to decide which two.

--------------------
Forþon we sealon efestan þas Easterlican þing to asmeagenne and to gehealdanne, þaet we magon cuman to þam Easterlican daege, þe aa byð, mid fullum glaedscipe and wynsumnysse and ecere blisse.

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Extol
Shipmate
# 11865

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quote:
Originally posted by Mockingbird:
Saying only two lessons would have been trickier, because we would have had to decide which two.

If reading three lessons at once, or using a separate text like the one Scott cites above, are not viable options, and one does not want to read the OT lesson from the other year (which IIRC is what the '79 BCP suggests), what is the best way to split up the three lessons four ways?

[ 28. November 2006, 18:19: Message edited by: lukacs ]

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Oblatus
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# 6278

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quote:
Originally posted by lukacs:
quote:
Originally posted by Mockingbird:
Saying only two lessons would have been trickier, because we would have had to decide which two.

If reading three lessons at once, or using a separate text like the one Scott cites above, are not viable options, and one does not want to read the OT lesson from the other year (which IIRC is what the '79 BCP suggests), what is the best way to split up the three lessons four ways?
One traditional way is to read only one lesson, followed by Magnificat, at Evening Prayer. This saves the Nunc dimittis for Compline. An easy way to avoid indecision about the order of lessons is to read the first two at Morning Prayer and the third one (Gospel) at Evening Prayer, making a nice progression through the day.
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Extol
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# 11865

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Thanks again Scott. *winks and makes gun motions for second straight day*
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jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

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quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Hi Ricardus!

Welcome to the Ship! Someone more important than I will probably wander past and greet you properly, but I got here first. Neener. [Big Grin]

[minor clarification]
As far as welcoming newcomers, there is no rank among shipmates and thus no 'doing it properly', so greet away, Spiffy!
[/minor clarification]

But I will add my greetings to Ricardus and hope that s/he will enjoy being on the Ship.

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Olaf
Shipmate
# 11804

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quote:
Originally posted by Hilda of Whitby:
I'm getting nibbles of curiosity about the St. Helena's Breviary. Could those of you who use it tell me more about it?

PS Oh, and any info/opinions on the St. Helena's Psalter would be appreciated as well.

I have grown accustomed to SHB, but it took a while. They are substantial (long) offices largely occupied by Psalms.

The Psalter language and the offices exhibit the best use of inclusive language that I've ever seen.

"Anybody interested in contemporary offices done decently and in good order should look no further than the St. Helena Breviary"

"A veritable gem!"

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Boadicea Trott
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# 9621

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quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus Sacerdos:
You may be interested in the Franciscan Office Book. This is the official office of the Franciscan Order of the Sacred Heart (FSC).

ooh ! New and FREE !!
I have now downloaded this. What a treasure ! Thanks for the link ! [Smile] [Overused]
Welcome Aboard, BTW.

--------------------
X-Clacks-Overhead: GNU Terry Pratchett

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kenosis
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# 10433

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At the moment I'm using the BCP order for working my way through the psalter - ie I get through the whole thing each month. This is the style that best suits me, but I am finding it a bit draining when one day there seems to be an awful lot to get through, and on other days it's quite thin. Does anyone know of any decent alternatives that cover the psalter in order over a similiar period, but are a bit more consistent in how much is covered each day?

Maybe should write one myself...

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Extol
Shipmate
# 11865

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Tom--take a look at the schemas at http://www.kellerbook.com/SCHEMA~1.HTM
Posts: 1287 | From: New Jersey | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Ricardus Sacerdos
Apprentice
# 12087

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Try the schema in the Franciscan Office Book. It is meant to match up with the LotH, so that one is praying the psalms together with the rest of the Church.

Reading the psalms in order makes no more sense than singing the hymnal in order when you think about it.

Posts: 20 | From: Georgia, USA | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged
Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus Sacerdos:
Reading the psalms in order makes no more sense than singing the hymnal in order when you think about it.

I've thought about it. [Cool] I don't see anything wrong with singing the hymns in order, nor praying the psalms in order. Seems like a fine plan, and easy to keep track of.
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