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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course
AdamPater
Sacristan of the LavaLamp
# 4431

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As your dishes are cleared by our efficient wait-staff, we hope you enjoy the rest of your meal.

AdamPater
Heavenly Host

[Subject edited to make intent clear - AP]

[ 06. June 2008, 09:54: Message edited by: Alan Cresswell ]

--------------------
Put not your trust in princes.

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Timothy the Obscure

Mostly Friendly
# 292

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Something simple, but delightful for the fish course:

1 lb. salmon filet
1/2 cup (125 ml) soy sauce
1/2 cup (125 ml) maple syrup (the real stuff--hard to get outside North America, I know)
1 tsp. Liquid Smoke (smoke-flavored seasoning--do you have that on other continents? Optional anyway)
Generous splash of Thai sweet chili sauce

Mix the liquid ingredients and put them in a sealed plastic bag with the fish. Marinate in the refrigerator for 2-3 days, turning every now and then. Take out the fish, put on an oiled broiling pan, sprinkle with coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, and bake at 400 degrees F (204 C) for about 10 minutes, or until internal temperature is 120 degrees F (48 C). A spoonful of mango chutney makes a nice garnish.

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When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.
  - C. P. Snow

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Cod
Shipmate
# 2643

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I'm not sure if I'm quite safe on this thread, but anyway....

For a hot sunny day, which we in the Southern Hemisphere are enjoying many of just now:

=================
SAMOAN FISH SALAD
=================
1 fillet very fresh white fish (snapper is good)
1 can of coconut milk (Samoa Brand is good)
1 red pepper (capiscum) chopped
1 spring onion chopped very finely
1/3 normal onion, chopped very finely
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Salt

Mix ingredients together. Add a small amount of water, if coconut milk is very thick.
Leave to marinade in the fridge for a couple of hours. Then .... dig in!

[ 01. February 2006, 04:46: Message edited by: Cod ]

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"I fart in your general direction."
M Barnier

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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Tuna-Cannellini Salad

1 can of tuna, drained
1 can of cannellini or other white beans, drained
1/2 jar dried tomatoes packed in olive oil, chopped, with some of the oil
a generous handful of chopped olive
generous sploshes of balsamic vinegar
a bit more olive oil
salt and pepper

Mix; eat. Tastes even better if you refrigerate overnight and let the flavors blend.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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Shortbread

This is from The Ladybird Cookery Book or somesuch but always turns out well and is much nicer than Delia's. In fact I ended up having to take about 3 pieces in my lunch to primary school or there'd be none left for me...

6oz plain flour
1oz rice flour
2oz caster sugar
4oz butter/margerine

Mix the dry ingredients together and rub in the fat until it clumps together. Press into a dish. Prick all over with a fork and make pretty patterns round the edge. Bake at gas 4 (180C) for 20-40 mins or until lightly golden. Sprinkle with sugar and mark into portions while still hot.

Simple! [Smile]

--------------------
Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Challenge time.

I am staying in temporary accommodation - so don't have my usual library of cookbooks, cupboards of exotic seasonings, batterie de cuisine etc. Nevertheless, I am planning on giving dinner to a discerning audience tomorrow evening.

I have quite a lot of pork chop. I am thinking some sort of oven braise. Not a casserole - that would be too greasy: I need something that keeps the meat moist, but allows final browning/crisping. Any ideas for a liquid/sauce in which they can cook? (Shallow tray, covered in foil). Then possiby take off foil, sprinkle with topping to finish?

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dolphy

Lady of Perpetual Responsiblity
# 862

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quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

In that case can we ask that the Heavenly hosts would take pity on us and send the last thread to the land of limbo... please?

--------------------
Looking forward to my rock moving closer again.

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Yangtze
Shipmate
# 4965

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quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

Er, how did you save it? I thought I'd saved it, but appear to only have a link. Any hints welcome.

--------------------
Arthur & Henry Ethical Shirts for Men
organic cotton, fair trade cotton, linen

Sometimes I wonder What's for Afters?

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I have quite a lot of pork chop. I am thinking some sort of oven braise.

Yes, braise that sucker in a Dutch oven. I've tried also using a foil bag, and the pan braise has always come out a little bit better.

I posted a pork recipe in the previous version of this thread, let me know if you want to see it. I'll post a general brine recipe: I can't stress enough how crucial it is to brine the pork, the flavor and juiciness are a wonderful improvement. A brine keeps meat moist and flavorful.

BRINE

Pork, chicken and poultry respond so well to brining.

In a container big enough to hold the pork plus liquid to cover, add the raw meat and then a 2:1 salt:sugar mixture (two parts salt to one part sugar. Add more sugar if you like a sweeter taste.) Add a palmful of whole black peppercorns, a bay leaf, 1 T. dry mustard, 1 c. dry white wine, 1 t. ground black pepper, and several dashes of liquid hot sauce. Add enough water to cover and let sit for 3-4 hours.

Discard brine when done.

[ 02. February 2006, 21:54: Message edited by: KenWritez ]

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Challenge time.

I am staying in temporary accommodation - so don't have my usual library of cookbooks, cupboards of exotic seasonings, batterie de cuisine etc. Nevertheless, I am planning on giving dinner to a discerning audience tomorrow evening.

I have quite a lot of pork chop. I am thinking some sort of oven braise. Not a casserole - that would be too greasy: I need something that keeps the meat moist, but allows final browning/crisping. Any ideas for a liquid/sauce in which they can cook? (Shallow tray, covered in foil). Then possiby take off foil, sprinkle with topping to finish?

Here is my favourite recipe for pork chops, which seems to suit your requirements

4oz mushrooms sliced
2 cooking apples sliced
1 onion sliced
4 pork chops
1/2 pint dry cider
2ox dry breadcrumbs
4oz grated cheese

butter a 3pint shallow dish. place mushrooms apples and onions in dish. season to taste. place chops on top. cover with cider. mix breadcrumbs and cheese together and sprinkle on top. bake at 200 degrees C or gas mark 6 for 1 1/4 - 1 1/2 hours.

This ends up with a dry crunchy topping, lovely moist chops, and a soft vegetable base. Great with roast potatoes and a green vegetable. And its the sort of dish you can prepare in advance and leave in the fridge until its time to pop it into the oven, which is sometime useful.

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
but allows final browning/crisping.

Whoops, forgot this bit.

After cooking, melt some buttter over the meat and brown it under a hot broiler for a few minutes. Flip meat, coat with butter, broil again.

GB&D.

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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mertide
Shipmate
# 4500

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I've had success with layering pork chops with apple sauce and sauerkraut in a casserole. If you buy the sauerkraut in wine vinegar it's less salty I think. It sounds a bit dodgy but even my picky teenagers eat it. Gives a tender but flavoursome result, a little sweet.
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Timothy the Obscure

Mostly Friendly
# 292

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People overcook pork, quite unnecessarily. Trichinosis is a non-issue nowadays. Use an instant-read thermometer and cook the chops to an internal temperature of 145 degrees F (62 C), or 150 if you're paranoid. They will have a faint rosy cast to them, and they will be moist and tender.

--------------------
When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.
  - C. P. Snow

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Peronel

The typo slayer
# 569

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I don't know if people remember me asking about breadmakers before christmas or not. Anyhow, I bought myself one, and it's wonderful. Haven't bought a loaf since getting it and, when I had shop bread at my parents, it just tasted ghastly in comparision.

I made this a couple of days ago. It's fantastic. Interesting texture, wonderfully fragrant, lovely flavour. It's great plain, and even better with cream-cheese or butter. Highly recommended.

1 tsp dried yeast
1 tsp salt
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 tbs dried milk powder
13 oz/3.25 cups flour, approx half granary and half strong white
a large carrot, peeled and grated.
1 tsp honey
1tbs olive oil
180 ml/generous 3/4 cup water.
large handful pumpkin seeds

Place things in the breadmaker in the order your instructions tell you. For me, that's yeast, then flour, then other ingredients, then water, but your machine may vary. The pumpkin seeds need to be kept back and put in the seed dispenser if you have one, or added when the raisin beep goes if not. Cook on the wholemeal setting.

Its glorious.

Peronel.

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Lord, I have sinned, and mine iniquity.
Deserves this hell; yet Lord deliver me.

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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I have a pork chop for me tea tonight. I might go and buy some mushrooms and an apple & try Gracious Rebel's dish...

--------------------
What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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samara
Shipmate
# 9932

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quote:
Originally posted by Peronel:
large handful pumpkin seeds

I have never cooked with pumpkin seeds. The only ones I have in the house are heavily salted and still in the shell - is that useable? They seem so big. Or can you buy unshelled?

I [Axe murder] my breadmaker and am always looking for new recipes.
Want a great flax bread recipe?

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Bookworms will rule the world (after we finish the background reading).
Courtesy of Trouble in China

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Peronel

The typo slayer
# 569

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Samara, the ones I buy are unsalted and shelled. (In fact, I didn't think pumpkin seeds had shells. Sure you haven't got a different sort of seed?) They're large, flat and sort of olive green, and are crunchy in the same way nuts are.

Definately yes to the flax bread recipe, please!

Peronel

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Lord, I have sinned, and mine iniquity.
Deserves this hell; yet Lord deliver me.

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Peronel

The typo slayer
# 569

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Winter salad

One beetroot (raw, not the icky pickled kind)
One apple
Two carrots
Half an onion
The juice of one orange
A handful of mixed seeds. I usually use poppy, sunflower and pumkin, because I have those around.

Peel and grate everything that can be. Toast the seeds (not the poppy seeds) in a dry frying pan til brown and fragrant. Mix everything together

Quantities can be varied according to what you have around.

I'm living on this stuff at the moment. Its just wrong. Nothing which is pretty much veg should taste this good, but it really does.

Peronel

--------------------
Lord, I have sinned, and mine iniquity.
Deserves this hell; yet Lord deliver me.

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The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
# 5638

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Thanks for all your help last month on the old thread, folks. I've managed to lose over a stone since then.

I have another question now, though.

I'm lookin for non-dairy fasting cheese. I hear it's available in Greece and wondered if anybody knows how to get hold of any in the UK? It apparently tastes like mild cheddar and behaves like cheddar (melts when heated &c), but uses no dairy. It may be the only thing that gets me through Lent without charges of GBH.

If anybody can help, I'd be grateful.

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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rosamundi

Ship's lacemaker
# 2495

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quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
I'm lookin for non-dairy fasting cheese. I hear it's available in Greece and wondered if anybody knows how to get hold of any in the UK?

B2F, can I suggest you try a health food shop for vegan cheese?

I seem to recall On the Eights Day, the vegetarian cafe/shop near MMU on Oxford Road in Manchester sold something similar.

Deborah

[One little word makes all the difference...]

[ 05. February 2006, 19:08: Message edited by: rosamundi ]

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Website.
Ship of Fools flickr group

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Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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I can't help with the cheese thing - I've found that even the half-fat stuff just tastes like soap, so I can't imagine non-dairy cheese.

I'm currently detoxing and so not having dairy at all (just for 4 weeks) and although cheese would be nice I'm managing fine without it (bear in mind that I could easily scarf down a pack of Cheddar in one go). I'm having lots of veg soups, this is one I did today and (though I say so myself) it was delicious. It is also ridiculously easy and a bowl is really filling. I don't know much about Orthodox fasting, but I would think that the olive oil is potentially the only thing that you'd need to omit.

1 onion, chopped
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 litre (1.8 pints) vegetable stock (I used bouillon)
750g (1.5 lbs) veg of your choice (I used potato, sweet potato, turnip, brussels sprouts, broccoli, frozen peas, carrot)
1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil.
1 tbsp fresh mixed herbs or 1 tsp dried herbs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to season.

Put the onion, garlic, olive oil, veg stock and vegetables in a large saucepan. Bring to the boil and simmer until the vegetables are soft (the recipe says 20 minutes but mine were done in just over 10).

Turn off the heat. Add the seasoning and herbs.

For a smooth soup, liquidise the lot. For a chunkier soup (my preference) liquidise half the soup and return to the pan.

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
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The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
# 5638

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Rosamundi, thank you! That raises my hopes.

I had mailed the Eighth Day cafe not long before posting, and I'm pleased to know that they at least used to sell something like this. If they don't anymore, they may at least know what I'm talking about. I'll post back when I hear from them.

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If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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Tabby Cat
Shipmate
# 4561

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By weird coincidence, my dad yesterday bought two dairy-free cheeses from On the Eighth Day. We'd never tried it before. Apparently it tastes okay on a sandwich with lots of other stuff...
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Peronel

The typo slayer
# 569

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I've not yet come across a vegan cheese I'd actually eat twice.

Sorry.

--------------------
Lord, I have sinned, and mine iniquity.
Deserves this hell; yet Lord deliver me.

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Tabby Cat
Shipmate
# 4561

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Okay, I just went and tried some. It's kind of icky. I had to have a piece of real cheese to take away the taste.
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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

Er, how did you save it? I thought I'd saved it, but appear to only have a link. Any hints welcome.
OK, I hope the following makes sense. I put the Recipe thread in "printer-friendly view;" opened a MS Word document in another window; then selected and copied sections of the Recipe thread and pasted them onto the Word document. I had to do it in about 6 chunks -- my computer froze up when I tried to copy and paste the whole thread at once.
One of these days (when I have an hour or two to spare) I'll edit the thing... deleting recipes for nasty things like brussels sprouts [Razz]

--------------------
Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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AdamPater
Sacristan of the LavaLamp
# 4431

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Here is a copy of the recipe thread, but I can't guarantee for how long the link will work.

--------------------
Put not your trust in princes.

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The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
# 5638

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[Frown] about the stories of vegan cheeses.

I suppose a small quantity first is the best way forward.

--------------------
If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

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Ginga
Ship's lurker
# 1899

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There seems to be a lot of salads on this thread. Here's another one. My friend got it from her Bangladeshi contacts but I don't know anyting more about its origins. It's incredibly good with curry as it takes the heat out, and it's also wonderful with plain jasmine rice.

Kuchumber
4 inches of cucumber
1/4 - 1/2 red onion
3 tomatoes
Generous handful of fresh coriander
Juice of one lemon
Pinch of salt.

  • Cut everything up as small as is physically possible - for example, I slice the cucumber into millimetre slices, then pile them up and slice them lengthways about ten or so times. I then leave them as slivers. You probably need to do the tomatoes with a serrated blade.
  • Sprinkle the salt over the diced red onion.
  • Put it all in a bowl.
  • Dress with the lemon juice.

This makes enough for between three and five servings, depending on the circumstances. Everything can be fiddled with. I don't tend to add the coriander, as the other diner prefers it without. If it's going with very hot curry, increase the lemon juice. Otherwise, you can take it down a bit if you prefer.

Every restaurant I've had this in has the veggies in much larger pieces, but it doesn't taste half so nice. I have been led to understand this is Unauthentic Corner Cutting.

[I hate unauthenticalnesses - AP]

[ 06. February 2006, 06:06: Message edited by: AdamPater ]

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Ginga
Ship's lurker
# 1899

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That'll teach me to have several browsers on the go. By the time I got back to the Ship the edit window was gone.

Apologies for Unauthentic Apostrophe Usage in the preceding post.

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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Quoted by me:
quote:
I have a pork chop for me tea tonight. I might go and buy some mushrooms and an apple & try Gracious Rebel's dish...

I was too lazy to go and buy mushrooms & an apple, so made do with shallots (no onions either!) and a leek. It was perfectly acceptable, & different to the plain old roast chop I was going to do. Thanks!

--------------------
What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

Posts: 3042 | From: 'twixt les Bois Noirs & Les Monts de la Madeleine | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Peronel

The typo slayer
# 569

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quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
[Frown] about the stories of vegan cheeses.

I suppose a small quantity first is the best way forward.

This may or may not help, but I find that - in sandwiches, on soups, and the like - toasted sunflower seeds satisfy in much the same salty-chewy way that cheese does. To toast them, just stick them in a hot frying pan (no oil needed) and move them about for two or three minutes until they smell brown and done.

Doesn't help you with cooking, of course, but it may make lent more interesting.

Peronel.

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Lord, I have sinned, and mine iniquity.
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Posts: 2367 | From: A self-inflicted exile | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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Back to breadmakers - I made a multiseed loaf which worked out perfectly the first time, but every time I've made it since then, almost all the seeds have stayed at the bottom of the pan and not mixed in. This seems to be to do with the consistency of the dough, but I don't know whether I should be adding more flour or more water to sort it out. Does anybody have any suggestions?

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Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Yangtze
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# 4965

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quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

Er, how did you save it? I thought I'd saved it, but appear to only have a link. Any hints welcome.
OK, I hope the following makes sense. I put the Recipe thread in "printer-friendly view;" opened a MS Word document in another window; then selected and copied sections of the Recipe thread and pasted them onto the Word document......
quote:
Originally posted by AdamPater:
Here is a copy of the recipe thread, but I can't guarantee for how long the link will work.

Fab. Duly saved. Thank you both.

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Posts: 2022 | From: the smallest town in England | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
# 5638

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quote:
Originally posted by Peronel:
quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
[Frown] about the stories of vegan cheeses.

I suppose a small quantity first is the best way forward.

This may or may not help, but I find that - in sandwiches, on soups, and the like - toasted sunflower seeds satisfy in much the same salty-chewy way that cheese does. To toast them, just stick them in a hot frying pan (no oil needed) and move them about for two or three minutes until they smell brown and done.

Doesn't help you with cooking, of course, but it may make lent more interesting.

Peronel.

Thanks Peronel! I don't know why I didn't post here earlier. The Eighth Day have got back to me. They do a few vegan cheeses, including all of these, which sound rather good. I'll try them and post back to say how they are.

[ 06. February 2006, 12:58: Message edited by: Back-to-Front ]

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Posts: 14741 | From: Greater Manchester, UK | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Foaming Draught
The Low in Low Church
# 9134

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Ah, trust the Grauniad to come up with an environmentally sound and cheap recipe.

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Posts: 8661 | From: Et in Australia Ego | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Foaming Draught:
Ah, trust the Grauniad to come up with an environmentally sound and cheap recipe.

This reminds me of the 'flat chicken' indicator of how well the economy is doing.

In Arkansas there are poultry farms which raise broiler chickens in huge quantities. They are also transported in huge quantities. A few usually fall off of the truck. In bad economic times people stop their cars and pick up these chickens before they are squashed; in good times they don't bother. In good times you see chickens on the highway squashed pancake flat.

This is the flat chicken economic indicator.

Moo

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Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
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# 9826

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Speaking of Chicken...

The first dinner I ever cooked as a teenager by my own self, from a recipe in Good Housekeeping , I think. Apologies for American measurements

Stovetop BBQ Chicken
1/2 cup ketchup
1 TBS vinegar
1 TBS brown sugar or honey or molasses or such like
1TBS Worchestershire sauce
1 TBS oil
1 tsp mustard
1 clove garlic, minced or equivalent of garlic powder
1 medium onion, chopped finely
2-3 lb assorted chicken parts

Mix ketchup with seasonings. Place chicken in large frying pan (recipe update: spray with kitchen spray first...sauce can stick a bit); pour sauce over chicken. Cook over medium heat for 45 minutes-hour, turning chicken pieces frequently. You may need to add a little bit of water.

This recipe lends itself to all manner of amendments, depending on your personal tastes and what you have on hand. I've tried it with skinless chicken, and it works fine that way too.

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Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
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# 3238

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Serendipitous chicken recipes, indeed,

This is an easy recipe for when you want a casual, family-style one pot dinner with a minimum of work. All measurements are US.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

1. Oil or butter a baking pan.

2. Slice enough Yukon Gold potatoes into 1/2" thick slices to cover the bottom of the pan.

3. Mince 4-8 cloves of fresh garlic (depending on taste) and spread them across the potatoes.

4. Heat 1 cup water and dissolve two servings of chicken bouillion in it, then pour over potatoes.

5. Drop on bite-sized pieces of cooked chicken, sausage, cooked pork or any combination of the three.

6. Cover the top of the open pan with frozen peas, cubed carrots, green beans or any mixture thereof.

7. Evenly space eight pats of butter across the top of the veg OR drizzle olive oil on them lightly. Dust with kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste.

8. Cover dish tightly with aluminum foil and bake until potatoes are tender, about 30-45 minutes. Remove foil and sprinkle top of food heavily with seasoned breadcrumbs and with a hearty mixture of grated Parmesan or Asiago cheese, gouda and cheddar. Bake uncovered for about 5 minutes, or until cheese is melted and crumbs are golden brown. Serve.

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Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Amos

Shipmate
# 44

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Foaming Draught:
Ah, trust the Grauniad to come up with an environmentally sound and cheap recipe.

This reminds me of the 'flat chicken' indicator of how well the economy is doing.

In Arkansas there are poultry farms which raise broiler chickens in huge quantities. They are also transported in huge quantities. A few usually fall off of the truck. In bad economic times people stop their cars and pick up these chickens before they are squashed; in good times they don't bother. In good times you see chickens on the highway squashed pancake flat.

This is the flat chicken economic indicator.

Moo

Over here it's perfect potatoes--not squashed or anything, falling off the trucks and lying along the verge. I preached a Harvest sermon on them one year.

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At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

Posts: 7667 | From: Summerisle | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
welsh dragon

Shipmate
# 3249

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I did something vaguely similar to Ken's recipe on Sun. I sauteed some onions and shallots in a big, tough casserole. Then I put in a load of fresh, chopped up veg - leeks, carrots, swede, potatoes. I added about a pint of chicken stock and boiled it all for 10 mins. Then I stuck a cheap cut of lamb on top, together with some rosemary and bay.

I put the casserole, plus lid, in the oven, on low (gas no 3) and we went out to church and for a walk with a friend afterwards, then came back about 3 hours later.

It was received very favourably.

Little washing up, of course, and no work to do when we got home, straight to the table.

[ 07. February 2006, 21:29: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]

Posts: 5352 | From: ebay | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Years ago I had a recipe for no-bake cookies. They contained rolled oats, peanut butter, and some form of chocolate, among other things.

I was talking to a Tech student yesterday, who said he really liked cookies but didn't know how to bake. He didn't feel he had time to learn. I mentioned this recipe to him, and he was very interested.

I can't find my copy. Does anyone else have it? IIRC this was popular in the 1950s and 1960s.

Moo

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Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
mertide
Shipmate
# 4500

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No Bake Minutes Cookies or No-Bake Cookies might be what you're looking for. The first has cocoa, the second chocolate chips
Posts: 382 | From: Brisbane | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
samara
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# 9932

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Breadmaker recipes:

On my machine, liquid ingredients first, then dry, with yeast in a little dent in the middle.

Also, adding gluten (I buy it in a box at the local grocery store) makes a world of difference for the consistency of the bread. I think bread machine flour has gluten in it, but we just use regular whole wheat and all purpose or white flour, but add 1 tsp gluten per 1 cup white flour, 1 1/2 tsp per 1 cup wheat flour.


I like the flax bread recipe one a lot better than either the white or whole wheat bread recipe that came in the instruction manuel. It is the best one we've found for staying edible past day 1. My sister found it a little sweet to her taste, but that's easy to fiddle with that for personal preference.

(I'll try Canadian bilingual measurements - but this measuring by weight some people appear to do is foreign to me)


Flax Bread
On my machine, I use the basic setting for 1 1/2 pound loaf.

  • 1 1/3 cups (300 mL) water
  • 2 Tbsp (30 mL) canola oil
  • 3 Tbsp (45 mL) honey
  • 1 1/2 cups (375 mL) white flour
  • 1 1/3 cups (300 mL) whole wheat flour
  • 3 tsp (15 mL) gluten
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) coarse flax flour (this can be bought directly or made from seeds by grinding (in my case, in a coffee grinder)
  • 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) salt
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) yeast (I use quick-rise)


This is one of my other favourites (I'm sure someone asked [Devil] ) It's best lightly toasted with butter and honey for breakfast. Mmmmm. This one is meant to be slightly sweet.

Crusty Cornmeal Loaves
Whole wheat setting on my machine, 1 1/2 pd again
  • 7/8 cup water (220 mL or 7 oz, apparently)
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) butter, melted (or 1/4 cup (60 mL) canola oil)
  • 1/3 cup (75 mL) honey
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) salt
  • 2 1/2 cup (625 mL) white flour
  • 1 1/4 cup (310 mL) cornmeal
  • 4 tsp (20 mL) gluten
  • 1/2 Tbsp (7 mL) sugar
  • 2 tsp (60 mL) yeast

Both of these are adapted from scratch recipes, if anyone wants to make bread the enjoyable but time-consuming way.

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Posts: 439 | From: Canada | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Peronel

The typo slayer
# 569

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:

I was talking to a Tech student yesterday, who said he really liked cookies but didn't know how to bake. He didn't feel he had time to learn. I mentioned this recipe to him, and he was very interested.


Would he be interested in some really easy biscuit recipes? After all, the only difference between the baked and the non-baked variety is that, after mixing everything, you plunk the tray in the oven for a few minutes.

As baking goes, its as easy as it gets. Pretty much on a par with boiling an egg or making toast in terms of cooking difficulty.

Peronel.

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Lord, I have sinned, and mine iniquity.
Deserves this hell; yet Lord deliver me.

Posts: 2367 | From: A self-inflicted exile | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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Something very similar to LutheranChik's BBQ chicken recipe also works very well with sausages:

Chop and brown off some sausages (we use 6 for 2 of us) in a little oil, add chopped onions, carrots, leeks etc (I added parsnips yesterday which was rather good) and fry for a few minutes then add a tin of baked beans, a squirt of ketchup, 1tsp mustard, a dash of Worcester sauce, herbs, black pepper and so on - whatever comes to hand really, and simmer on a very low heat for an hour or two until everything is mushy.

It's great with mash or couscous but my latest innovation is to boil sliced new potatoes for about 10 mins and make a sort of hotpot by transferring the sausage mixture to a casserole and layering the potatoes on the top with a few dobs of butter and whacking it under the grill to brown off the top. [Smile]

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Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Thanks, Mertide. The first recipe is the one I was looking for.

Peronel, he really doesn't want to learn to bake anything right now. He's never done it, and he has his hands full with his academic load.

Moo

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Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I've got a recipe out of a magazine, which as it calls itself "quick and easy" involves a tub of fresh neapolitan sauce "from the chiller cabinet". As these things are way overpriced and I'm not short of time I'd rather make it myself, but am not sure what it involves. Any info gratefully received!

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EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
mertide
Shipmate
# 4500

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Neapolitan can mean your basic tomato sauce, or it can have olives/capers/mushrooms or even ham or sausage added. Depends where you're from, you might want to check what your chiller ingredients are.

Your basic tomato sauce starts with tinned plum tomatos, drained and seeded and pushed through a coarse sieve. Fry some finely chopped garlic and onions gently in some olive oil, add the tomatos, some salt, pepper, basil and oregano. Cook for 15 minutes. If you want to add olives, add some ripe one sliced near the end. You might want to add a splash of red wine if you like. A couple of anchovies don't hurt either. Knock yourself out!

Posts: 382 | From: Brisbane | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged



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