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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course
RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny Lane:
At RuthW's request in another thread, here is my pumpkin bread recipe.

Many thanks! I'll be trying it in about a week.
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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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Posted by BabyBear on a different thread:
quote:
'frin has a lovely recipe for Brownies in a Jar. All the dry ingredients are layered up in a large jar, a pretty covering is made for the lid, and the recipe and instructions are tied on with ribbon.
Sounds great - does 'frin hang out here, or would I be best to PM her?
Anyone else have this recipe?

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
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Got it on the other thread - Thanks Baby Bear!

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What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
Shipmate
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I have such a problem. I'm baking an Onion Pie (w/cheese & curry - yum!) and the house is fragrant with the odor - and I can't eat it! I'm taking it to a pot-luck this evening at church with some very special First Nations friends.

So I figured I'd share the recipe with y'all, so you too can suffer this delightful torment. [Big Grin] I got this from my Mom - it was in one of her first cook books when she got married in 1946. She observes that women tend to like it more than men (hmmm - the "quiche" thing?!), so KenW, report back.

Curry Cheese-Onion Pie
1 ½ c. coarse ground soda crackers (saltines)
¼ tsp. curry powder
6 T. melted butter
Mix together; reserve ¼ to sprinkle on top. Line 9” pie plate with the rest.

2 T. butter
1 ½ c. onions, sliced (about 2 medium onions)
1 ¼ c. milk
¼ tsp. paprika
½ - 1 tsp. curry powder (I prefer the full amount)
dash of cayenne pepper
salt (I don’t use any as I’m using salted butter – add, if you like more)
1 T. cold milk
1 ½ c. grated sharp cheddar cheese (my mom has often used Velveeta...)
2 eggs, beaten

Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees.
Saute onions in butter until tender but not brown. Spread over cracker crust.
In a double boiler heat milk; when it is hot mix the spices with the tablespoon of cold milk (do NOT do this in advance; it will thicken!) and then add the liquid spice mixture to the hot milk. Add the grated cheese and stir until melted. Beat the eggs and gradually add to the hot milk mixture (so as not to cook them in the process!). Pour milk/cheese mixture over the onions. Sprinkle the reserved cracker mixture on top and bake for 35-40 minutes. Serves 4-6.

I use a cast-iron skillet to cook the onions and then use the same skillet (unwashed) for heating the milk, but I'm careful with the heat and use a diffuser. It's lovely with a green salad...

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
Here are two of my favorite pumpkin recipes:

Pumpkin Bread ... Frost-On-The-Pumpkin Bars

Mamacita, I've just used one of your pumpkin pie recipes that you've previously posted and yum! So I will be making another trip to the store to buy another pumpkin (and chopping, steaming, straining, and pureeing it, cuz no tinned pumpkin available here) to try one of those recipes.
Wow! Thank you, Flausa, for the compliment. I'm so glad you enjoyed the recipe. I love this thread! (And I'm drooling like one of Pavlov's dogs from reading Kenwritez' restaurant review above.)

I just found this website called Cooking for Engineers while googling for a Shrimp Scampi recipe (frozen jumbo shrimp having been on sale at the supermarket). Don't know if the recipes are any good, but I loved the format with all the photos and charts.

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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I had a go at making yogurt, and whilst it tastes fine, it is rather thin. Is there any way to thicken yogurt?

What would happen if I reduced the milk before adding the yogurt? Would it result in a thicker yogurt?

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
Shipmate
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I'm sure other folks will understand better than I, but reducing would require full-on boiling, right? That *might* interfere with the milk's ability to culture... [Confused]

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Tea gnome
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I made yoghurt too! [Big Grin] I think it tastes quite nice, and it doesn't seem to be a curdled mess, and it was dead easy! It did have quite a bit of wateryness on the top, but I drained that bit off. And now I'm stewing some apples with raisins to go with it. [Big Grin] Thankyou for the recipe!
Gnome

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Reduction can take place at a simmer (~85C) but it takes longer for it to happen that if it were boiling.
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Would a small quantity of cornflour (arrowroot) serve the purpose?

I notice that about a tablespoonful with thicken an entire fondue.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Mamacita, that recipe site looks great - thanks. I've bookmarked it.

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Timothy the Obscure

Mostly Friendly
# 292

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
I had a go at making yogurt, and whilst it tastes fine, it is rather thin. Is there any way to thicken yogurt?

What would happen if I reduced the milk before adding the yogurt? Would it result in a thicker yogurt?

Probably you just needed to let it ferment a bit longer (though some batches never seem to get as thick as you'd like, no matter how long you wait--natural products just vary that way. Commercial yogurts mostly have gelatin added for a thicker consistency).

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When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.
  - C. P. Snow

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Tea gnome
Shipmate
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Would it make a difference if you used a thicker yoghurt for the culture? I used a yoghurt which is not my usual brand, which is a set yoghurt which often has wateryness. And that's what I got for my yoghurt. Maybe next batch I'll buy a little pot of a different kind, and see if it makes a difference to the result. Or would using full fat milk change it?
Gnome

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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Usually home made yoghurt thickens up after a few days - it's how much culture there is in the mixture - but not always.

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I had to revise dinner plans rapidly yesterday as when I cut open the squash from our veg. box it turned out to be completely unripe. So, now it's been cut, how long can I keep it, and will it ripen? And for future reference, how do I tell whether or not it's ripe in the first place??

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Nea Fox

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Catrine
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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Mamacita, that recipe site looks great - thanks. I've bookmarked it.

Me too! I particularly loved the diagram at the end of the recipes, it suits the panic cooking scientist in me.
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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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Can anyone identify this mystery vegetable? It was in this week's box and I don't know whether to cook it like cabbage or pak choi or something, or whether it's more like lettuce! [Help]

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Nea Fox

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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Swiss Chard?

If so you can cook the leaves like spinach and treat the stalks like asparagus as the simplest ways of getting the flavour.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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mertide
Shipmate
# 4500

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Looks to me what you have is tatsoi. I'd eat it fast, it has a short shelf life, but it's a nice mustardy addition to salad greens or you can wilt it in a warm salad or shred it in some soup right at the end of the cooking. More a lettuce than a spinach, though.
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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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images of Swiss Chard show it with red stalks, which I'm not seeing in your photo... I suspect Mertide is right... do let us know, okay? [Big Grin]

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I think mertide has it! I'll let you know how it turns out. [Smile]

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EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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mertide
Shipmate
# 4500

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I hope I am. [Smile] Otherwise, you could always taste it, and if it's too bitter raw you could cook it.

BTW, McDonalds uses tatsoi here in their salads, but I doubt serious foodies on this thread would recognise it from that context. [Hot and Hormonal]

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John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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Swiss chard can have either red or white stalks and veins. But I don't know whether this is it.

John

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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It not being the time of year for salads, I added the mystery vegetable (the taste of which matched the description of tatsoi!) to a stir fry right at the end so it was just wilted. Very nice! [Smile] I think the flavour might be a bit strong for me in salad, but I'd be willing to give it a go...

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EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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I ran across these sites today and they seemed appropriate for this thread:

à la carte

and...

tastingmenu.com

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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KenW baby (did you know I have an 'adopted' Chinese son named Kinwa?! no, of course not--) - WHERE have you been? such silence from your environs...

You've provided links to tasting menu before (thank you) but the first one is new - cool! I love cruising these places; cruising and drooling, that's me [Big Grin]

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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I am looking for healthy lunchbox ideas for myself and the cubs. Any ideas of website that might help?
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mertide
Shipmate
# 4500

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You could try this one. or this. It really depends on what you and the cubs like, and how old they are. And, of course, how much time you want to put into lunch. There's not much more frustrating than preparing well balanced and creative lunches that boomerang in the lunch box. You might do your chicken and walnut salad pita and have the kids say all they want is peanut butter sandwiches. Every day. For 12 years.
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Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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This is a bit late, but just to say that to thicken home made yoghurt, mix a dribble of your UHT milk with some dried skimmed milk powder (a table spoon or 2? I don't ever bother to measure!) before adding in your yoghurt starter. Makes it creamier too!

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Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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(Sorry for the double post - it's just that no body else has posted in the last 20 mins or so!)

OK I give up. I hadn't read this thread for ages and ages and ages and I come back and someone mentions a Scottish thread and I just can't find it. It might have had a recipe for Black Bun on it. Can anyone give me one that works? I got one off the net last year and it tasted yucky and didn't hold together and was generaly awful. I can do a decent Christmas pud and cake and stuff so I don't THINK it was me [Hot and Hormonal] Can anyone help??

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life is purple

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Tea gnome
Shipmate
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Tried making yoghurt with a different kind of commercial yoghurt as a starter, and lo, it was runny, but thick and mild, quite different from the first lot. (Actually, it was a bit like custard)
Gnome

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Sparrow
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# 2458

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Has anyone got a good recipe for an authentic Hungarian Goulash?

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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re: yogurt thickness. the runniness is pretty normal, and yes most commercial yogurts have geletin added. that's probably your easy answer - add geletin.

the other is to strain it for a few days, then it becomes a very thick consistancy, a bit like ricotta. I use it for baking and have been experimenting with pie fillings.

fit a wire strainer over a bowl, line it with one or two paper towels (or a really clean tea towel) and pour your fresh yogurt into the strainer. cover with another tea towel (plastic wrap is probably fine) and refridgerate the bowl-strainer assembly for two or three days. quite a lot of thin, almost transparent liquid will strain into the bowl, leaving most of the solids behind.

Another strategy is to use heavy cream instead of milk. (calorie alert) I Iearned this from russian friends, who call it smetana (not the composer). you heat, cool, wisk, and set just like regular yogurt. the end result is thicker, closer to grocery store variety, though still not as jellied, but more creamy. the flavor is spectacularly rich. I use it as the cream in cream soups, and the flavor is amazing. A dollop on oatmeal is also a wonderful treat.

I have also made a chocolate pudding with the smetana and ate far too much of it.

[ 23. October 2006, 18:39: Message edited by: comet ]

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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# 10651

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Comet, wouldn't that be the proper use of cheesecloth? (the straining the yogurt thing). And I don't know about anybody else, but I would have no idea how to add gelatin to homemade yogurt - when would you add it? Unlikely to DO it, mind you, just curious! [Big Grin]

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Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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Made yoghurt yesterday. Children ate it all today. Will now go and make more, which they no doubt will not eat before we go away on Friday leaving it to grow blue fluff over the long weekend.....

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life is purple

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Amazing Grace

High Church Protestant
# 95

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I made Mamacita's "Frost on the pumpkin bars" for coffee hour, to rave reviews - I put some Halloween candy on each piece for decoration. (I used five-spice for spicing, with an extra hit of ginger.)

But I've got a quarter can (4 oz) of pumpkin puree left, because I cut the recipe to 3/4 to fit my 13 by 9 pan instead of the 15 by 10 specified. (do the math)

Any ideas? Pumpkin pudding or mousse? Pumpkin custard in a ramekin? I've got eggs and cream in the house.

I can obviously take a bigger recipe and whack it down to size. Indeed I'm going to be checking the pumpkin pie filling recipes in my Fannie Farmer book with that in mind, but I wondered if the assembled Panel of Experts had any ideas.

Charlotte

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John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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pumpkin custard is easy -- somewhere up-along there's a recipe for pumpkin pie -- that will give you an idea of the proportion of milk to egg to sugar to pumpkin. Use the same spicing as you liked for the other. Just make it the way you prepare any custard, pour into a large basin or separate custard cups and cook in the oven like any other custard. I don't bother with putting the cups in water and they work out just fine.

John

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
Comet, wouldn't that be the proper use of cheesecloth?

oh probably. I am not completely sure what cheesecloth is. how is it different than bandage gauze?
quote:
And I don't know about anybody else, but I would have no idea how to add gelatin to homemade yogurt - when would you add it? Unlikely to DO it, mind you, just curious! [Big Grin]
I dunno.

***flips through books. tosses books away. reads back of Knox box***

geletin needs to be added to hot liquid and stirred well to fully disolve. so.... how about for every cup of milk, an envelope of geletin, and wisk it in with your live culture? (or earlier, when you take the milk off the flame) then whisk like mad.

it doesn't work, you're out a cup of milk.

if anyone tries it, let me know how it works!

Buffalo stew tonight, with garden toms and carrots and potatoes. *big sniff* Ahhhh....

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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# 10651

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oooh, I'll bet one packet per cup of milk is an awfully high ratio of gelatin to (potential) yogurt. At least I think so, because the yogurt will thicken somewhat on its own; the gelatin is just to stiffen it up a bit, you know? Otherwise, well, you know you could probably make Naughty Toys with that much additional stiffening power... (I'm celibate, I don't want to go there, thank you very much. Ah, but it's my nature... *sigh* [Help] ).

But I'd love to hear a report come back on the pros and cons of adding gelatin to yogurt. [Big Grin]

Cheesecloth is an open weave, but not as open as bandage gauze... it also sometimes has a waxy quality to it. There is a very brief Wikipedia article on it... I just figure, if they use it to drain cheese, it would be good for draining yogurt...?

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Laud-able

Ship's Ancient
# 9896

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Powdered gelatine should be well moistened with cold water and then dissolved with the required amount of water (or other liquid) that is very hot, but off the boil.

Adding hot water directly to unsoftened gelatine is likely to form lumps.

The dissolved gelatine should be cooled before being added to other ingredients. In particular, mixtures of gelatine and milk do not respond well to heating: the milk solids invariably curdle.

Leaf gelatine is more expensive than powdered gelatine, but it does not have that faint taste and smell of glue size: it is softened in cold water and then dissolved in hot, and used as above.

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'. . . "Non Angli, sed Angeli" "not Angels, but Anglicans"', Sellar, W C, and Yeatman, R J, 1066 and All That, London, 1930, p. 6.

Posts: 279 | From: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Advocatus Diaboli
Ship's cannon
# 5172

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A month back into student life and I must say I'm pretty fed up with the standard pasta-and-tomatoey stuff / pasta-and-cheesy stuff / pasta-and-pesto / egg fried rice / dahl / sandwiches / toast and toppings fare I can be bothered to rustle up.

My desperation is such that I find myself wishing I was living back in College, with College food. Goes to show just how fed up I am!

I'm a vegetarian of the no meat no fish variety. I don't have an oven, but I do have a microwave, two electric rings, a kettle, a toaster and a fridge. Difficult to pronounce items or foodstuffs not listed in my Dutch phrase book are off-limits.

Any original ideas from the Ship's galley?

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Shipmate formerly known as lazystudent

The only way of catching a train, I have discovered, is to miss the train before. (G.K.C.)

Posts: 576 | From: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Yangtze
Shipmate
# 4965

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Stir-fry.

Ok not great on an electric hob, but not impossible. Rice in one pan on one ring and then do the veggies on the other.

Try:

Green leaves (if you can find a Chinese grocery store then choy sum or pak choi will be readily available, otherwise use spinach) with garlic and dark Chinese vinegar - I used to live off this!!

Egg & Tomato
a classic northern Chinese dish and one of my favourites
make an omelette, break it up and set it aside
clean pan and fry spring onion, garlic and ginger. Add quartered tomatoes. Cook for a bit and then add in the omelette. Stir. Add salt if necessary. (Dark Chinese vinegar can be added at the cooking tomato stage if you like)

Slice tofu cooked with chilli paste is good as well though does have a tendency to smoke the kitchen out!

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Arthur & Henry Ethical Shirts for Men
organic cotton, fair trade cotton, linen

Sometimes I wonder What's for Afters?

Posts: 2022 | From: the smallest town in England | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
Advocatus Diaboli
Ship's cannon
# 5172

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Thanks Yangtze!

Forgot to mention that I'm in a bedsit, so anything that's going to smoke out my 'kitchen' will also have the same effect on my sitting room, work area and bedroom...!

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Shipmate formerly known as lazystudent

The only way of catching a train, I have discovered, is to miss the train before. (G.K.C.)

Posts: 576 | From: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Advocatus Diaboli
Ship's cannon
# 5172

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Forgot to add that there's a Chinese shop on my way home - didn't look at the veg last time I was in there but will do next time.

Must buy a wok!

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Shipmate formerly known as lazystudent

The only way of catching a train, I have discovered, is to miss the train before. (G.K.C.)

Posts: 576 | From: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Stoo

Mighty Pirate
# 254

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You don't have a wok?

Ha! We have found you out! You cannot be a real student.

You must be a fake.

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Posts: 5266 | From: the director of "Bikini Traffic School" | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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Woks are good for cooking things like risotto in - you can do good veggie versions like risi e bisi, which is rice and peas, flavoured with onion, garlic, reasonable stock and a parmesan like cheese (parmesan not being veggie, but there are veggie versions). It also tastes good with brown rice. Or mushrooms make a good risotto.

The Cranks Recipe books have lots of recipes. A way of dealing with casseroles in a bedsit is a slowcooker. OK as a student - put together in morning before you leave, come home to warm cooked meal.

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Advocatus Diaboli
Ship's cannon
# 5172

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I am a real student, I am! It's just that arriving to an unfurnished room - a horrible surprise - meant I had to buy absolutely everything new, and my budget only stretched to two pans. I might see what I can do about a wok now, though.

Cranks' cookbook is going on my Christmas list - thank you, Curiosity killed... and others.

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Shipmate formerly known as lazystudent

The only way of catching a train, I have discovered, is to miss the train before. (G.K.C.)

Posts: 576 | From: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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a friend of mine (who was a loony messianic Jew but we won't go in to all of that!) when he was a student used to live of flat breads (flour, water, oil, and an egg if he was feeling rich, made in to a dough and cooked like chapati's in a dry frying pan) with cheese or baked beans on top.

As for Christmas lists, Lakelands to a Tefal slow cooker for one that is also a rice cooker or a steamer. I got one for my sister and it is fantastic. Do a stew in it one night (it does enough for about 3 servings) and eat with pasta or baked potatoes, and then the next night reheat the stew whilst cooking some rice in it. If you ate meat I would say "The nice thing about slow cooking is you can eat all the really cheap cuts of meat from the butcher like shin, stewing mutton, and the like." But you don't. But I will leave it in for others that might be perusing the thread..... do hope you don't mind. But you can do good vege curries with chickpeas and things in them as well, soups, risotto's and all sorts of things. Just make sure you cut root veg small as they can take ages to cook.

If I can get this right, here is a link to it: Lakeland 3 in 1 cooker

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life is purple

Posts: 376 | From: Swindon, UK | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by lazystudent:
pretty fed up with the standard pasta-and-tomatoey stuff / pasta-and-cheesy stuff / pasta-and-pesto / egg fried rice / dahl / sandwiches / toast and toppings fare

If you are ok with milk, cream and cheese, then the World of the Potato opens up.

Mash beaten up with milk and topped with grated cheese used to be a standard when I were a student.

Also, potatoes (and other root veggies) braised in stock (slow pan with lid) can be delicious.

Not forgetting the potato salad - cold with onion and mayo, or hot, with a spicy tomato dressing.

And for really nice stodge on stodge, puff pastry (score the top so that it forms a lattice) stuffed with thinly sliced potato and cheese and baked is ace.

In fact, if you can thole pastry, the amount of fillings that can be enclosed is endless. Or, reverting to the potato, turned into a pie/flan and then topped with potato (and cheese, of course).

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I forgot, this comes from Katharine Whitehorn's Cooking in a Bedsitter which isn't all vegetarian, but is a way of doing pizzas.

You make a quick pizza base by mixing self-raising flour and plain yoghurt, then kneading into a disc. (Plain yoghurt - a neighbour of mine used raspberry to peculiar results). Fry (in oil) one side of this base in a pan until golden brown. It also puffs up. Turn, top with anything else you want on top - made tomato paste, vegetables, olives, cheese. Cook other side, which will heat through the topping and melt the cheese if it's soft enough. It's quite greasy, but if you're craving a pizza it works. You can also cook the base in the oven.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged



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