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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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fabula rasa - I used goose eggs for making Faberge style eggs* around presents a few years back. I decided I didn't like the taste of the eggs, even buried in cakes or quiches.

*You can either blow the eggs, or very carefully saw off the tops, or crack them off and deal with the unusual shaped edge. If you hinge the two parts back together, paint in turquoise or other jewel like colours, "jewel encrust" it, including stand and paint the insides, you can use it as a display piece that can hold a present.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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I discovered soy sauce has wheat in it the hard way. [Projectile]

but that's okay, because I'm not a big soy fan anyway.

Also not a big cornmeal fan. I am okay with corn tortillas, but not thrilled. same with corn chips. I have a guacamole obsession, but I dip veggies in it. corn fritters, bread, and breading etc, are not my thing.

We use rice noodles constantly. if I could find a good mac and cheese alternative with them, we'd be a happy family. but meanwhile, pad thai is a regular dish here, and I used them also for a marinara type sauce as well.

Hmmm.... I think pad thai sounds good tonight...

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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I've been given a Thai food lovers survival kit, and now need to know how to use the contents. It contains. Thai rice (can deal with that OK), Red curry paste (fry something, add paste, add coconut milk, bubble and serve - think I can mange that but any extra tips welcome), Kaffir Lime leaves (hey????) and sweet chillie sauce.....(drizzle on what??) Anyone able to help?

Oh and I'm still after a black bun recipe... I have posted on the Scottish thread too....

[Help] [Help] [Help] [Help]

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life is purple

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Eloise
Shipmate
# 4292

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I would try kaffir lime leaves in SE Asian-type curries. I have a beef rendang recipe that uses them, if you'd like. I use sweet chilli sauce in stir-fries and marinades, and use it as a dipping sauce for spring rolls, samosas etc. Potato wedges are also really good with sour cream and sweet chilli sauce.

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Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. - The Red Queen

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Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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On the subject of gluten-free recipes using almond flour (aka almond meal), may I recommend the utterly delicious orange & almond cake. There are any number of recipes for this around, some with syrup, some with longer lists of ingredients. All are, I think, indebted to Claudia Roden for the original idea. It's easy to make, dresses up very well for parties, and is always popular. I've sometimes thought of making it and cooking the mix in muffin tins so I can freeze them for individual indulgence from time to time, but haven't ever got round to it.

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Eschew obfuscation!

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Comet, have you tried melting some butter, some heavy cream and some gorgonzola together and tossing the noodles in that? Add chopped mushrooms or chopped peppers or both to tart it up a bit if you want. A shake of Tabasco or similar goes well with it, too.

The cholesterol content is high but what the heck!

[ 02. November 2006, 11:04: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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Made Flausa's curried pumpkin soup yesterday, although without the sweet potato, and it was lovely! Thank you! [Big Grin]

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EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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# 10651

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quote:
Originally posted by Nats:
Lot's of Japanese food is Gluten free but not "comfort foods" really.

My priest's Japanese wife (well, his only wife-- [Biased] ) says that she has two stomachs and a meal without rice leaves her hungry, no matter how much food she eats. She's not such a big miso soup fan (but I love it); I think her comfort foods are all rice-based.

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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I bought up supplies today and so... let the comet pre-season test kitchen commence! tomorrow, I'm trying Cranmer's amazing looking almond orange thing. I will report.

I also bought a 2 quart casserole/rammekin thing, and will make pumpkin "pie" custard. should I put it in a pan of hot water in the oven?

and this weekend, the angel pie crusts are planned.

I'm very excited. I love you all!

[Yipee]

(Woddy - I'll get gorgonzola next time I'm in town and try it. maybe I'll try it with my parmesan too...)

comet

(also bought a beeeeeyoooootiful new saute pan today. cost me a fortune...)

[ 03. November 2006, 06:48: Message edited by: comet ]

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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I have a packet of curry leaves - dried little things they are. How should I use them?

I popped some in the water in which some chopped pumpkin was simmering, in preparation to be added to an already made veg curry that needed padding, but I don't know if that was the right use.

Can anyone enlighten me?

I love this thread. It's made me hungry in readiness for my lunch out at Gerard's bar - it''s sure to be:
- thick slices of auvergne cured ham, with gherkins and butter, and a salad with a good peppery French dressing.
- slow braised meat, that falls off the bone, with a thick gravy, and some kind of potatoes (I hope it's his creamy Dauphinoise)
- a cheese board that varies between heels of evil looking blue and wizened goats cheese, to a plate of delicious looking blue, fresh goats and a sharp St Nectaire. It just depends on when we arrive...
- And probably the fruit bowl, but sometimes slices of Vienetta ice cream cake, and one magical time, it was two delicious cream cakes.

All for ten euros (about £7.50), wine included. Not bad, eh?!

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Penny Lane
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# 3086

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quote:
Originally posted by comet:
(also bought a beeeeeyoooootiful new saute pan today. cost me a fortune...)

I bought 3 last weekend, because I couldn't quite decide in the stores. Brought them all home to compare. Naturally I liked the most expensive one best [Waterworks]

(note to self: get the others back to the stores this weekend!!!)

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~Penny

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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny Lane:
Naturally I liked the most expensive one best [Waterworks]

Naturally. It's called "champaign taste on a beer budget".

I suffer the same affliction.

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I upped mine. Up yours.
Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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Going back to the Thai food lovers kit, my Thai recipe book suggests that Sweet Chilli Sauce should be served with spring Rolls or other similar Thai dishes.

I bought Kaffir lime leaves as the yellow chicken curry recipe wanted it served with the leaves chopped on top - they taste like lime zest would, but milder.

Red curry paste is a milder version of the curry pastes that are the basis of most Thai curries. I have recipes using it fish cakes, steamed fish, pork curry with aubergine, barbecued chicken etc.

Thai food is one of those that's dairy free, so I cook a fair bit.

[ 03. November 2006, 22:08: Message edited by: Curiosity killed ... ]

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
quote:
Originally posted by Penny Lane:
Naturally I liked the most expensive one best [Waterworks]

Naturally. It's called "champaign taste on a beer budget".

I suffer the same affliction.

Hello. My name is comet and I'm a CTBB afflicted cook.

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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quote:
Originally posted by Cranmer's baggage:
On the subject of gluten-free recipes using almond flour (aka almond meal), may I recommend the utterly delicious orange & almond cake. There are any number of recipes for this around, some with syrup, some with longer lists of ingredients. All are, I think, indebted to Claudia Roden for the original idea. It's easy to make, dresses up very well for parties, and is always popular. I've sometimes thought of making it and cooking the mix in muffin tins so I can freeze them for individual indulgence from time to time, but haven't ever got round to it.

!!!

that's amazing. I'm scarfing right now.

next time, I will reduce the sugar by about a quarter, I like it a bit tarter than this calls for. but OMG is that divine. thank you!

it's on the list for Christmas!

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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Glad you enjoyed it. The Almond and orange cake, along with the berries in champagne jelly, are my two standard gluten free desserts. Both delicious, both relatively easy, and both very popular. Can't do better than that, I reckon.

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Eschew obfuscation!

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Ethne Alba
Shipmate
# 5804

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tangent reminder...
food left to cool in the oven causes clouds of smoke if not removed in time for the next person to use
end of tangent.....
off to fumigate oven before baking

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fabula rasa
Shipmate
# 11436

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Cranmer's Baggage--the orange/almond thing looks amazing, and the berries in champagne jelly looks wonderful. Did you by any chance post a recipe for the latter somewhere, and I missed it? If not, do you have a link easily available? (If not, sorry to trouble you--I'll dig up a recipe and report back.)

Now, help please feeding large numbers of toddlers and grownups together. (I know that no challenge is too great for for the Ship's cooks!)

Problem: a meal for 10ish families with children ranging from 0-3. Issues:

1. It has to be reasonably easy and cheap to prepare.

2. The food has to be simple enough that there will be something for, say, a 10-month old to munch on.

3. It has to be very healthy--so no salt, little if any sugar, etc.

4. It has to appeal to a wide range of palates/dietary needs, and not be the kind of thing that parents have to force their kids to eat.

5. It has to be a nice treat for the grown-ups, who probably have little enough time for proper, grown-up food.

So far I've been doing very simple roast chicken, rice, broccoli and carrots (that's it--total ingredients just named) w/ a separate sauce for those who want it. Fruit for desert. No one's been poisoned, but I don't think anyone's going to include it in their list of "10 most inspired meals I've ever had". Any help/thoughts very much appreciated!!!

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Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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I often do baked potatoes in these circumstances. A selection of toppings could include, cheese, baked beans (of course!) tuna mayo, ratatui (sp?!), chilli concarne - all depending on how adventurous you were feeling and the varying dietry needs. For pudding, a simple pineapple upsode down pudding with custard will meet most peoples needs!

An alternative first course could be spag bol. stick in some lentils to lower the cost and up the nutritian, but there needs to be no vegetarians coming!

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life is purple

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by comet
next time, I will reduce the sugar by about a quarter, I like it a bit tarter than this calls for. but OMG is that divine. thank you!

Thanks for that, comet. I copied the recipe but haven't tried it yet. Since I don't like things that are very sweet, I reduced the sugar in the recipe.

Moo

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Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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Good options for feeding the multitude:
Lasagne
Pasta bake (3 cheese sauce, or tuna & cheese sauce)
Quiche (for a big crowd I'd do a mixture of vego & not)
Potato bake (slice potatoes, onions, carrots, and other vegetables to taste - layer in large baking dish or roasting pan with grated cheese and bacon if desired. Make a 'custard' of eggs & milk, pour over layered stuff. Bake in moderate oven until custard is set.)

Berries in 'Champagne' jelly

Ingredients
750 g. mixed frozen berries
30g. powdered gelatine
1 cup apple or apple/blackcurrant juice
1 750 ml bottle sparkling white wine (or non-alcoholic sparkling wine if preferred)

Method
Heat juice in saucepan over low heat, or in a bowl in the microwave until nearly boiling.
Dissolve gelatine in juice, allow to cool slightly.
Place gelatine solution in a large (1.5 litre minimum) bowl.
Slowly add sparkling white wine, stirring continuously. If a ‘head’ forms on the jelly, you may wish to skim this off.
Allow jelly to cool, but not set.
Prepare 1.75-2.0 litre jelly mould (if you don’t have a large jelly mould, a large fluted cake tin will work just as well).
Pour enough jelly into the mould to cover the base.
Refrigerate to set.
Pour a layer of berries over the jelly, and cover with more jelly. Return to fridge until set.
Repeat with layers of berries and jelly until all are used.
Refrigerate overnight, or until very firm.
Unmould onto serving plate.

Warning: since you do not cook this, the alchohol content of the bubbly remains. [Big Grin]

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Eschew obfuscation!

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fabula rasa
Shipmate
# 11436

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Oh, Nats and CB--thank you both for your thoughts, and CB, for taking the time to type out the champagne/berries thing, which I look forward to trying.

I somehow have the feeling that my young families are going to be a bit better fed than previously!

[eta: just to be clear, I'm noit intending to feed alcohol to 2-year-olds....]

[ 06. November 2006, 12:27: Message edited by: fabula rasa ]

Posts: 465 | From: scepter'd isle | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged
welsh dragon

Shipmate
# 3249

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I am sure that I made the orange and almond cake as an experiment from one of my Dad's Claudia Roden books some years ago. It tasted fine but IIRC was a little solid in texture (though that may well have been my fault and not the recipe!).
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rugasaw
Shipmate
# 7315

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quote:
Originally posted by fabula rasa:

Now, help please feeding large numbers of toddlers and grownups together. (I know that no challenge is too great for for the Ship's cooks!)

The baked potatos sound good. A secret to nice fluffy baked potatos is when they are ready to be served squash them then push the two ends in. Top with butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, chives, and chopped barbeque beef. Trust me its good.

If you are intersested I'll try to get Pata to post her home made noodle(thick doughy noodles) recipe. It goes great with roast chicken.

Spaghetti and meat sauce goes well.

I hope it turns out great Fabula Rasa.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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The orange and almond cake does have quite a dense texture. It's certainly not a sponge cake, or even a tea cake texture. More like the sort of texture of a chocolate mud cake (and I've got a flourless chocolate cake recipe somewhere, too, I just remembered). The texture can surprise if you're not expecting it, but it's fairly common for middle-eastern cakes (and that's it's origin, after all), and quite delicious.

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Eschew obfuscation!

Posts: 1537 | From: the apple isle | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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Please excuse the double post. Here's a recipe for the flourless chocolate cake if anyone's interested.

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Eschew obfuscation!

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Feeding the 5000 without loaves and fish?

I'm thinking you don't want salads etc over there at this time of year?

Curries. Casseroles done in slow cooker if liked.

Zucchini slice which is absolutely yummy even if children don't normally like vegetables.

Tortellini, ravioli etc with a sauce. My grandchildren love them and call them "little pies."

Savoury mince, browned, a dash of curry, Worcestershire sauce, tomato sauce and lots of vegetables. Other herbs and spices and grate carrots etc to fool the little ones if they are picky. Mine aren't, fortunately.

Lots of bread rolls.

Tins of tuna in a white sauce, not too runny. In a baking dish with cheese and breadcrumbs on top and browned. Again can be padded with vegetables.

Risotto. There are even recipes for oven baked which taste quite good and eliminate lots of time stirring. Stirred are better, but these pass.

Over here we can get "lovely legs." These are like drumsticks with bone chopped off. Easy to eat. Put in baking tray. Mix lemon or orange juice with some honey and soy sauce. Pour over and bake. Good finger food for littlies.

Sausage sizzle is popular with children. BBQ'd or baked thin sausages rolled in bread or a roll.


Camp standby of dessert - an apple crumble or apricot. Use large tins of pie apple, now called "baker's apple" down here or apricot or peach. Place in baking tray and cover with crumble mix of flour, brown sugar and butter rubbed together. Bake till crunchy. Can be served with cream or custard.

Will try to think of more.

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Posts: 9745 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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Cb, you are my hero. I also have a hazelnut gateau that I'm planning to alter to get the wheat out of. I'll report back.

The almond orange cake is very dense, and very moist. and rich! small pieces. with cream. oh my...
[Axe murder]

Fabula: for finger foods try "bugs on a log" 2-3 inch sections of celery, peanut butter filling the rib, and raisins stuck in the peanut butter. not for any really small ones due to nut allergy concerns, but fabulously popular in the preschool set.

I would also put out little condiment bowls with raisins, goldfish/cheddar bunnies (little crackery things), and maybe mozerella cheese sticks. little ones just want to graze, smear with goo, and move on.

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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Glad to be of service, Comet.

Minor victory tonight. I had some left-over mash & veg from the other day, and had another attempt at potato fritters. After 30 years of trying, I finally made them to my satisfaction.

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Eschew obfuscation!

Posts: 1537 | From: the apple isle | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
Yangtze
Shipmate
# 4965

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quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by fabula rasa:
[qb]
If you are intersested I'll try to get Pata to post her home made noodle(thick doughy noodles) recipe. It goes great with roast chicken.

Yes please.

I used to live off thick noodle soup cooked with lamb broth at a certain small restaurant when I lived in northern China. And then I had the best thick homemade noodles ever up in the mountains of southwest China. But you can't find them in Chinese restaurants here and I've never even thought about making them myself for some reason.

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organic cotton, fair trade cotton, linen

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Penny Lane
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# 3086

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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
[QUOTE]And then I had the best thick homemade noodles ever up in the mountains of southwest China. But you can't find them in Chinese restaurants here and I've never even thought about making them myself for some reason.

I'm not sure they'd be the same as what you recall, but if you can buy packaged won ton wrappers, they can be sliced into strips and cooked in broth.

Along that vein, (US) Southern-style chicken & dumplings can always feed a crowd. In this case, dumplings are wide, thick noodles. It's basically just stewed chicken, seasoned with chopped onions, celery, carrots, and the dumplings cooked in the broth. I've always used frozen dumplings, so I don't have a recipe, but perhaps someone else does.

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~Penny

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fabula rasa
Shipmate
# 11436

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Thank you all so much for your help/advice--I'm really, really grateful. I have just a few questions:

rugasaw (BTW--complete tangent--how is one meant to pronounce your name?)--for the fluffy baked potatoes, do you mean roll them around a bit before you cut into them?

Lothlorien--is zucchini slice a sort of loaf made with eggs? or something else? (And thx for so many ideas--I hold these lunches all the time, so v grateful!)

comet--just to say that the little condiments thing is brilliant. A lot of the kids are just too distracted to sit down and face a plate of food, but might well graze at stuff in bowls.

Thanks thanks thanks to all! [Overused]

Posts: 465 | From: scepter'd isle | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged
Amazing Grace

High Church Protestant
# 95

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quote:
Originally posted by comet:
I have never heard of gram flour, though use chickpeas elsehwere, mostly in hummus and a great chickpea curry.

can it bee used in the place of wheat flour?

as for recipes for dumplings/pancakes - yes please! I'd love to try those.

has anyone used almond flour?

Chickpea pancakes (socca in the South of France) are yummy and easy to make. I combine the chickpea flour and water till it looks to be the right consistency (stirring hard to get the lumps out), and add salt/pepper. Then cook. How I usually like them is inbetween French crepes and American pancakes in consistency - still foldable but not wafer thin like a crepe.

Wrap them around something savory and you have mighty fine eatin'.

Look for it at: health food store, Italian grocer, East Indian grocer.

Charlotte

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Posts: 6593 | From: Sittin' by the dock of the [SF] bay | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
rugasaw
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# 7315

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quote:
Originally posted by fabula rasa:
rugasaw (BTW--complete tangent--how is one meant to pronounce your name?)--for the fluffy baked potatoes, do you mean roll them around a bit before you cut into them?

rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

About the potatoes, I mean squash them to about half the size. It really loosens up the insides of the potato.

Yangze, I'll get to work convincing her to figure out the measurements she uses.

Comet for a pie crust you might use crushed pecans and butter mix pressed into a pie pan. The crust may fall apart but will taste wonderful.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

Posts: 2716 | From: Houston | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lynn MagdalenCollege
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# 10651

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quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

I can't help it - I'm seeing an otherwise chiseled and noble Native American face with a well-broken classic rugby-injured nose...!

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

Does this mean I have to stop calling you "rugbychick"? [Biased]
Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
rugasaw
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# 7315

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quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

Does this mean I have to stop calling you "rugbychick"? [Biased]
You can keep calling anything you want until we are both at the same shipmeet [Snigger]

Lynn if you knew some of the games that chickasaws play you might include broken noses in those chiseled faces. By the way the only chiseled native american faces I have seen are those with out enough food. [Biased]

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

Posts: 2716 | From: Houston | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lynn MagdalenCollege
Shipmate
# 10651

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I have a Cree friend who has something of a chiseled face... but yes, I have noticed that *some* First Nations people tend to go a little soft; of course, having gone A LOT soft myself, I completely understand!

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

Posts: 6263 | From: California | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Anna B
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# 1439

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I'm happy to report that I've settled on a Thanksgiving menu.

Silver-dollar crab cakes with red pepper sauce

Roast turkey (a Bourbon Red heritage bird, brined)
Truffled mashed potatoes
Cranberry sauce
New England Dressing (with sausage and apples)
Lidia's brussels sprouts (leaves separated and sauteed in garlic and olive oil)
Roasted winter vegetables
Fennel-celeriac slaw

Champagne

Fruit platter
Pumpkin, apple, and pecan tartlets

Coffee and tea

[Axe murder]

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Bad Christian (TM)

Posts: 3069 | From: near a lot of fish | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lynn MagdalenCollege
Shipmate
# 10651

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Anna, how do you separate brussel sprout leaves? The one time I worked with 'em they seemed nearly sealed shut.

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

Posts: 6263 | From: California | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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cut the bases off and rub them between your fingers.

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L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Anna B
Shipmate
# 1439

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quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
Anna, how do you separate brussel sprout leaves? The one time I worked with 'em they seemed nearly sealed shut.

You need a sharp paring knife and a lot of patience. The results are worth it, though. This is how I do it.

1) After washing, cut off the stem end and remove any outer leaves that are discolored.

2) Then core the sprout. You should wind up with two pieces, one of which is conical in shape. Discard this.

3) Start peeling. I find it's easier to work from the bottom, which will have been loosened by now.

4) When you get to the hard whitish part that is very, very tough to peel, simply mince it and add it to the pile of fluffy leaves.

I'd just add that brussels sprouts are even tastier if you buy them still attached to the giant stem on which they grew. (This never fails to spark conversation with fellow shoppers.)

[ 10. November 2006, 20:41: Message edited by: Anna B ]

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Bad Christian (TM)

Posts: 3069 | From: near a lot of fish | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
rosamundi

Ship's lacemaker
# 2495

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I have a recipe for Cattern Cakes (traditionally served by lacemakers on St Catherine's Day, November 25th):

Cattern Cakes

9oz/275g self-raising flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1oz/25g currants
2oz/50g ground almonds
2 teaspoons caraway seeds
7oz/200g caster sugar
4oz/100g melted butter
1 medium egg, beaten
A little extra sugar and cinnamon for sprinkling

Preheat the oven to 200 C/400 F/gas 6.
Sift the flour and the cinnamon into a bowl and stir in the currants, almonds, caraway seeds and sugar.
Add the melted butter and beaten egg, and mix well to give a soft dough.
Roll out on a floured board into a rectangle, about 12 x 10-inches/ 30 x 25 cm.
Brush the dough with water and sprinkle with the extra sugar and cinnamon. Roll up like a Swiss roll and cut into 3/4 inch/2 cm slices.
Place these slices, spaced well apart, on a greased tray and bake for 10 minutes.

Cool on a wire rack. Sprinkle with extra caraway seed if you like.

Anyway, almonds have a tendency to make me messily and unhappily unwell - can I replace the ground almonds with ground rice? I know it won't taste the same, but would it break the recipe entirely?

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Posts: 2382 | From: here or there | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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According to my Margaret Costa's Four Season Cookery Book you can replace 1.5oz of ground almonds with 1oz of flour (self-raising flour in this recipe).

It's in the options to the seed cake recipe and I remembered that from a time I cooked it and didn't have ground almonds.

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Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Rosamundi
Anyway, almonds have a tendency to make me messily and unhappily unwell - can I replace the ground almonds with ground rice? I know it won't taste the same, but would it break the recipe entirely?

I think ground rice would be a bad idea. Rice is pure carbohydrate, and almonds are largely fat.

Are you intolerant of all nuts or just almonds? If you can tolerate other nuts, grind some and see if the recipe works that way.

Moo

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Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rosamundi

Ship's lacemaker
# 2495

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Are you intolerant of all nuts or just almonds? If you can tolerate other nuts, grind some and see if the recipe works that way.

Moo

Intolerant of all nuts, I'm afraid. I'll try Curiosity killed...'s suggestion of a touch extra flour.

Deborah

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Yangtze
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# 4965

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quote:
Originally posted by rosamundi:
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Are you intolerant of all nuts or just almonds? If you can tolerate other nuts, grind some and see if the recipe works that way.

Moo

Intolerant of all nuts, I'm afraid. I'll try Curiosity killed...'s suggestion of a touch extra flour.

Deborah

How are you with pinenuts? I ask, coz they're not really nuts so you might be OK with them, and ground up they'd be quite oily as well like the almonds - they'd add a flavour too which is what the almonds would and flour won't.

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Posts: 2022 | From: the smallest town in England | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
rosamundi

Ship's lacemaker
# 2495

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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
How are you with pinenuts? I ask, coz they're not really nuts so you might be OK with them, and ground up they'd be quite oily as well like the almonds - they'd add a flavour too which is what the almonds would and flour won't.

Pine nuts I'm ok with... Might give them a go.

Oh, and I sort of made this up on Friday night (AKA what happens when there's a lemon and a tin of white crab meat reduced in the supermarket, and you fancy something comforting and fairly quick for dinner):

Crab risotto

This quantity serves 1:

4 fl oz risotto rice
1/2 pint vegetable stock (you may not need all this, it depends how thirsty your rice is)
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tin white crab meat (170g undrained weight)
4 oz frozen peas
Juice of 1 lemon
butter
lots of Parmesan, to serve.

Soften the onion and garlic in a pan with the butter (about 15 minutes or so - the onion should be transparent, rather than coloured). Stir in the rice so it gets coated with the butter, cook for a couple of minutes. Add the lemon juice and stir until it's all absorbed. Gradually add the vegetable stock, stirring after each addition until it is nearly all absorbed before adding the next bit of stock. When it is nearly cooked, stir in the drained crab meat and the frozen peas, stirring until the peas are defrosted and the rice is thoroughly cooked. Serve with lots of grated Parmesan cheese stirred in.

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Corpus cani

Ship's Anachronism
# 1663

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I had some friends for lunch on Sunday (- and they tasted great! Ba-da-boom-tish!)

Believe it or not, it was the first time this true blue Englishman has ever cooked roast beef.

All went well BUT:

I gather it is wise to leave a joint on the side for a while after roasting - something to do with making it easier to carve? - but

a) how long should one leave it and
b) how does one leave it to stand and yet serve meat that is not stone cold by the time it's carved, on the plate, everybody's helped himself to roast pots'n'pars, veggies, Yorkshire puds &c and is ready to eat it?

Cc

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Bishop Lord Corpus Cani the Tremulous of Buzzing St Helens.

Posts: 4435 | From: Trumpton | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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It's important to all full-cooked meats "rest"--uncut--for at least 5-15 minutes after you remove them from the oven. (For a very large piece of meat, like a whole turkey or a beef primal, let it rest 20-30 minutes.) If you cut into the meat before then, the fluid in the meat will drain out and the meat will be dry and less tasty.

[Boring lecture on heat and capillary action discarded.]

To keep the meat as warm as possible, tent or wrap it in aluminum foil. I suggest letting the meat rest in its pan so you can make a pan sauce with drippings plus whatever juice does leak out of the meat.

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged



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