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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course
Lynn MagdalenCollege
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thanks for explaining this; I was pretty close, in my guess (yay for me [Big Grin] ).

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Dee.
Ship's Theological Acrobat
# 5681

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Mmmmm,

Roast Beef.

My Dad has just bought a barbeque with a rotisserie on it and we spit roasted a peice of beef the other week for a dinner party....soo goooood.

Thanks for the orange and almond cake recipie Cranmer, My Mum had just discovered she is wheat intolerant and that one will be a great christmas dessert!

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Jesus - nice bloke, bit religious

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Penny Lane
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I'd like to make garlic butter that has a good garlic flavor without being overpowering. In the past I've used garlic powder, but I'd like to try using cloves of garlic put through a garlic press. Any suggestions for ratio of cloves to butter?

--------------------
~Penny

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Laud-able

Ship's Ancient
# 9896

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I suggest a cautious start with one or two cloves of garlic to half a cup of butter, one or two teaspoons of finely chopped parsley, and salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Put the unpeeled cloves of garlic on a chopping board under the flat of a cook's knife, and give the knife a sharp smack with the ball of your thumb. The papery skin of the clove will then come away easily. Chop the garlic very finely – with the parsley if you like – and knead into the butter, salt and pepper.

Many cooks advise against using a garlic press which, they say, brings out an acrid taste in the garlic (and it's also one more utensil to be washed).

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'. . . "Non Angli, sed Angeli" "not Angels, but Anglicans"', Sellar, W C, and Yeatman, R J, 1066 and All That, London, 1930, p. 6.

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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I find you can exert enough pressure on a clove of garlic with just about anything solid (the bottom of a glass, for instance) - just press. It doesn't take much to break that seal, as it were, and then the papery skin pulls right off. Not need to whack anywhere around a knife blade [Big Grin] (too many "oops!" experiences here...).

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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I use a cleaver and press with the flat of the blade and it works fine.

An alternative method for peeling garlic is to drop the cloves in a cup of boiling hot water for a moment then fish them out with a spoon and the skin should peel off quite easily. It's not my method of choice but it does work.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Dee.
Ship's Theological Acrobat
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I have also found that rubbing salt on your fingers removes the smell of the garlic...rub in the salt...rise off...smelly hands all gone.

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Jesus - nice bloke, bit religious

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KenWritez
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You can also brown the garlic in a little olive oil over medium heat to cut down the "power" of the raw garlic. This brings out the nutty aroma and really rounds out the garlic flavor into more mellow tones.
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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
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Julia Child once said:
quote:
You can never have too much garlic.


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I upped mine. Up yours.
Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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I should have known she was a soul-mate!

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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Garlic and Coriander [Cilantro] Curry.

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!!!!!!!!!!!!

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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Do tell, please, WW-- (I can smell it from here... [Big Grin] ).

--------------------
Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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It's really simple, quick and delicious - a recipe given by a friend many, many years ago long before I ever even thought of visiting India.

Chop some onions, peel A LOT of garlic, have some chopped tomatoes ready [tinned will do] and a fair amount of chopped fresh coriander/cilantro. As I now live in South India I would start off with some coconut oil but used to use sunfower oil in UK.

Heat a little oil in a pan, when it is hot add a teaspoon of black mustard seeds.

When they start to pop add the chopped onion and fry until soft.

Add the garlic [I prefer whole cloves but it is up to you] and fry, stirring, for a few minutes until they begin to change colour.

Add spices to taste - I would use turmeric, coriander and chilli along with some salt to taste. Instead of chilli powder adding a couple of green chillies sliced open works just as well.

After a minute or so add chopped tomatoes to moisten rather than drown.

Cook for 15 minutes or so then stir in two thirds of the herb.

Cook another 5 minutes, take off heat, check seasoning and balance if required.

Add remaining herb and serve.

There are loads of modifications possible such as adding a little creamed coconut with the tomatoes or, if you are feeling fancy, stirring in a little creme fraiche before serving - not very Indian but it tastes good!

It's one of those basic recipes that can be tarted up in so many ways. It is best as a side dish rather than main dish, a sort of garlic bhaji - but make sure you serve yourself some first or it might all go!

The most important thing is to ensure your partner eats some too, otherwise it could be seen as being antisocial.

[ 17. November 2006, 02:30: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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We're just trying to make our own crystallised/candied ginger - loads of recipes on the net so we're just giving it a go. I'd better go and give it a stir, will report back later.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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Complete disaster - in the final stages I took my eye off it for a few minutes and the whle thing caramelised.

[Waterworks]

We are going to try again next week.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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[Frown] - so many foods have that last critical moment where the right thing happens to finish it off, but half a second later the WRONG thing happens to ruin it.

So I don't suppose there's anything you can do with caramelized ginger?!

--------------------
Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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HWMBO whizzed it in the blender to go in sauces, I'm not sure what sauces but . . .

Actually it tasted kind of interesting.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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A lot of things can be whizzed beyond recognition in a blender.

Useful kitchen tool, that!

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Even more so than I was before

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Binker
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Wonder if anyone can help me: A woman at work this week told me about a chocolate cake recipe she used to make from a magazine 30+ years ago. She no longer has the recipe, and about all she could remember was that it used cocoa powder and hot milk, which made it very moist.

Given that Mr Binker is a coeliac, I thought the extra moistness might help if the cake was translated into gluten-free. BUT after googling hot milk etc for some time, I can't find any chocolate cakes using hot milk. Does anyone here know of such a thing?

--------------------
Now it's over, I'm dead and I haven't done anything that I want,
Or I'm still alive, and there's nothing I want to do...
--- They Might Be Giants

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KenWritez
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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
HWMBO whizzed it in the blender to go in sauces

I initially read this as "whizzed* in the blender...." [Eek!] [Projectile]

Yeah, I bet it was more interesting! [Help]


========
* "to whiz" is US slang for urinate.

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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Binker, A quick search and I can't find one either using hot milk. But there is this one. And, if my childhood memory serves me right, it is moist.

Chocolate mayonnaise cake

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Even more so than I was before

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Auntie Doris

Screen Goddess
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I have a great recipe for a chocolate cake which uses corn oil. It makes a fab moist cake!

Auntie Doris x

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"And you don't get to pronounce that I am not a Christian. Nope. Not in your remit nor power." - iGeek in response to a gay-hater :)

The life and times of a Guernsey cow

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frin

Drinking coffee for Jesus
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I googled without the word hot (recipe cake milk) and found this:

Hot Milk Cake

'frin

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"Even the crocodile looks after her young" - Lamentations 4, remembering Erin.

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Penny Lane
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I have a chocolate cake recipe that uses cocoa, buttermilk, and boiling water that is very moist. I imagine it is a variant of "Texas Sheet Cake", which you may also want to Google for ideas.

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~Penny

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Lynn MagdalenCollege
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You know, oil and mayonnaise and the like do make for a very moist cake but Texas sheet cake is made with black gold, Texas crude straight outta the ground, and it makes for a REALLY moist cake!!! [Snigger] You'll really find yourself running on it... of course, If you must you can use a can of 10-40 in lieu of the Texas crude, that's a fair substitution...

<I am kidding [Eek!] y'all know that, right?>

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Erin & Friend; Been there, done that; Ruth musical

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welsh dragon

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Re chocolate cake. I don't have a recipe to offer, but if you want something a) moist and b) gluten free how about mousse?

This one sounds good (though I haven't made it so can't endorse it practically.)

It might be even more decadent with a bit of alcohol in it! And I think it would be gluten-free (as long as the chocolate is. I imagine chocolate usually is).

By the way has anyone either eaten food by Heston Blumenthal or cooked any of his recipes?

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Binker
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[Overused] Thanks everybody!

PeteCanada - I can't quite imagine a chocolate cake involving mayonnaise. It just seems wrong. [Projectile]

'frin - ta for that. I'm pretty sure Crystal said it was a chocolate cake, but it wouldn't be hard to throw a bit of cocoa or something into that recipe.

Welsh dragon - Yep, chocolate is GF (unless it has tricky fillings etc), so mousse is good - anything that's pretty much just chocolate and cream with a little coffee or Baileys or the like can hardly fail! But I was really looking for the original recipe (to impress the woman at placement! [Big Grin] ), and then as an add-on, thinking it might be good GF.

Binker

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Now it's over, I'm dead and I haven't done anything that I want,
Or I'm still alive, and there's nothing I want to do...
--- They Might Be Giants

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
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Binker, you might also try looking up recipes for "flourless chocolate cake," which is I think a somewhat different consistency than a regular cake but sounds rich and yummy. As to the hot milk cake recipe, I have an old (1950s) cookbook downstairs which I'll check in the morning (is waaay past my bedtime).

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
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quote:
Originally posted by Binker:
Wonder if anyone can help me: A woman at work this week told me about a chocolate cake recipe she used to make from a magazine 30+ years ago. She no longer has the recipe, and about all she could remember was that it used cocoa powder and hot milk, which made it very moist.

Binker, I found this recipe in my old copy of The Settlement Cookbook, copyright 1965. I hope it works for you. I haven't tried it, but it sounds very moist.

Cocoa Cake
Preheat oven to 350 (moderate oven).

Cook the following until thick, then cool:
3/4 C cocoa
3/4 C sugar
1 egg yolk (reserve the egg white)
1/2 C milk

Next part:
1/2 C butter
1 C sugar
1 whole egg
1 egg yolk (reserve this egg white too)
2 C flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 C sour cream
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp vanilla
and the 2 reserved egg whites

Cream butter and sugar well. Add 1 whole egg and 1 egg yolk. Mix thoroughly. Sift flour, measure and sift three times with baking powder. Add flour gradually, alternating with sour cream well mixed with the soda. Add cocoa mixture. Stir well, add vanilla, then fold in the 2 stiffly beeaten egg whites. Bake 20-30 minutes in two well-greased and floured 9-inch layer pans. Fill and frost with chocolate butter cream frosting.
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That's the recipe as written. I think I've read somewhere that nowadays flour is processed such that multiple siftings (such as the above instructions to sift 3 times) aren't necessary. I sure don't do it! Anyway, good luck with the cake. I just might try this recipe!

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Binker
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Thanks for that Mamacita. Certainly sounds like about the right era. And who knows, I may even try it this weekend! Mr Binker isn't really that fussy about how his chocolate cakes happen, as long as they happen [Biased] .

--------------------
Now it's over, I'm dead and I haven't done anything that I want,
Or I'm still alive, and there's nothing I want to do...
--- They Might Be Giants

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birdie

fowl
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While we're talking about cake, it's baby b's 2nd birthday just before christmas.

I would like to make him a cake this year but am thwarted by the fact he is allergic to dairy and eggs. The dairy isn't a problem as we have soy substitutes for just about everything. Eggs, however, are proving to be somewhat fundamental to the cake-making process.

I know I could just do a heap of flapjacks or biscuits, but I'd really like to do a proper cake, that I can at least stick a couple of candles in.

Any ideas?

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"Gentlemen, I wash my hands of this weirdness."
Captain Jack Sparrow

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
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quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
I know I could just do a heap of flapjacks or biscuits, but I'd really like to do a proper cake, that I can at least stick a couple of candles in.

One can get "egg substitute" at health food type stores -- made from potato flour or something. I would suggest a heap o' experimenting before the Big Day.

--------------------
This is the last sig I'll ever write for you...

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welsh dragon

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quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
While we're talking about cake, it's baby b's 2nd birthday just before christmas.

I would like to make him a cake this year but am thwarted by the fact he is allergic to dairy and eggs. The dairy isn't a problem as we have soy substitutes for just about everything. Eggs, however, are proving to be somewhat fundamental to the cake-making process.

I know I could just do a heap of flapjacks or biscuits, but I'd really like to do a proper cake, that I can at least stick a couple of candles in.

Any ideas?

Ca va?

PS, I just googled for this, I haven't tried out the recipes...

[edited to add some more, also here & here ]

[ 23. November 2006, 20:57: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]

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mousethief

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Google for "lenten cake".

Here's one that works for us -- this is the spice cake variation. I assume you can fiddle with it to make different flavours. It sounds weird but it really works!

----------------------------------------------

SISSY YERGER'S LENTEN TOMATO SOUP CAKE

Cream together:

1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking soda
1 can condensed tomato soup

Soft together and add to the preceding:

2 C flour
2 tps baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp nutmeg
1 c nuts (optional)
1 c raisins (optional)

Cook at 300F in a tube pan or loaf pans. (that's what the recipe says -- we always use a 9x12 pan).

The recipe doesn't say how LONG to cook it -- check at about 25 minutes -- as with any cake, toothpick inserted into the middle should come back clean.

---------------------------------------------

LENTEN CHOCOLATE CAKE

3 C flour
2 tsp baking soda
6 Tbsp cocoa
1 tsp salt
2 C sugar or brown sugar (packed)
1 Tbsp vinegar
2 tsp vanilla extract
3/4 c corn oil
2 C cold water

Mix dry ingredients. In a separate bowl, mix wet ingredients. Mix together and pour into greased 9x12 pan. Bake at 350F for 45 minutes.

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This is the last sig I'll ever write for you...

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mousethief

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I didn't make clear -- those are 2 independent recipes. We have used both repeatedly with success.

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This is the last sig I'll ever write for you...

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Ferijen
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# 4719

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Following on from Birdie's request, I need ideas to suit the following...

New Years Eve requirement: scrumptious food for between five and seven people. Including someone who doesn't eat dairy, eggs or nuts, someone who doesn't like most red meat (mince in a lasagne is OK) and someone who isn't great on exotic vegetables.

Any suggestions (particularly for dessert, where fruit salad gets a bit boring and, oh, the non-dairy/nuts/eggs eater doesn't like summer pudding?)

[ 24. November 2006, 08:13: Message edited by: Ferijen ]

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welsh dragon

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Jelly (with fruit or alcohol or both) comes to mind. Gin and tonic jellies or champagne jellies or rose wine jelly with strawberries or raspberries.

Personally I love baked apples, and you could have an option of clotted cream or soya ice cream to go with.

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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Over on the Cake thread, Babybear queried about Oatmeal cake.

I don't like chocolate (intolerant of dairy), and white cakes can get boring.

Over thirty years ago a colleague gave me this recipe. It's worked for me when I've wanted a cake.

So with fear and trepidation, I offer it...

Oatmeal cake

1-1/4 cup boiling water
½ cup margarine or butter
1 cup oatmeal
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1-1/3 cup unsifted flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
½ tsp nutmeg
1 tsp vanilla
raisins
nuts

Mix boiling water butter, and oats in a mixing bowl. Let stand for 20 minutes.

Add sugar and eggs. Blend.

Add remaining ingredients. Stir to mix.

Turn into a greased and floured cake pan.

Bake at 350F for 35 minutes or until the cake springs back when touched with a finger.

I sometimes just dust it with some freshly crushed cinnamon and fine sugar while it is still hot.

Lemon frosting is good too if you must frost it.

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Even more so than I was before

Posts: 20466 | From: No longer where I was | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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I found a vegan chocolate pudding that sounds rather interesting recipe.

Something that is rather lovely are fresh pears poached in red wine and served with a raspberry sauce. You could of course go for something like a cranberry and orange sauce. That would work just as well.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Yes that would work. Cream like substance can be made by beating in a liquidiser Silken Tofu and Coconut Milk. Possibly add vanilla essence. This makes huge quantities. Well beaten you almost could serve it as an alternative to whipped cream.

Other substitutes for cream that can be made in smaller quantities include ground cashew nut mixed in Soya Milk or other milk substitute will create a single/double cream. Equally if you want a substitute for double cream rather than single cream you can ground cashew nuts to the shop ones and it will thicken it. However these will not whip up.

Jengie

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Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Bittersweet
Shipmate
# 10483

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Birdie - there are masses of vegan cake recipes out there (no eggs, no dairy, ideal). I would post, but only having English ones which I know work, am a bit chary of advising to you without knowing if you could get everything. However, googling "vegan cake recipe" should get you some good places to start - and if you see any credited to Leah Leneman, do try them, she tends to be scrummy.
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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Birdie

Rose Elliot has a Vegan Sponge (Layer) Cake. I have not made it but what I know of her recipes it is likely it will work really well. I will pm you it rather than infringe copywrite.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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I can recommend PeteCanada's cake - we use Jaggery which is a bit like Muscovados for the sugar to give a richer taste and we have also used half sugar and half honey. It is a flexible recipe and very tasty.

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Nicodemia
WYSIWYG
# 4756

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You probably all know this, but what is the difference between baking soda and baking powder?

What are the equivalents in England?

PeteCanada's cake sounded lovely and I want to try it!

Posts: 4544 | From: not too far from Manchester, UK | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate.

It makes a good fizz in the presence of acid and is indispensible for making up fun "science lessons" to impress 8-year-old children. Its also got half a dozen uses in cooking other than just a rising agent, and can be used for cleaning people and things.

Baking powder (in England at any rate) is a mixture of baking soda, some sort of acid, flour, and the usual drying agents and preservatives. I suppose the flour is in there to bulk it out.

Self-raising flour is flour with added soda. Its good for cakes and so on.

A recipe that calls for baking powder will work with baking soda as long as there is some source of acid present. If there is none in the recipe (fruit juice, yogurt, etc) you can add a little tartaric acid.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
birdie

fowl
# 2173

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Thank you muchly for these. I will certainly give one of them a try.

Bittersweet - I am in Britain (tho not England) so recommend away, if you want!

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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Baking powder (in England at any rate) is a mixture of baking soda, some sort of acid, flour, and the usual drying agents and preservatives. I suppose the flour is in there to bulk it out.

Self-raising flour is flour with added soda. Its good for cakes and so on.

It's also tartaric acid (cream of tartar) in the baking powder - and baking powder (not soda) in self-raising flour.

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This space left intentionally blank. Do not write on both sides of the paper at once.

Posts: 6842 | From: somewhere else | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I've also got a dairy/nut/chocolate intolerant child - much older though. Have you tried making rice pudding with coconut milk? I tend to sweeten it with dried fruit and add cardamon pods to the mixture.

Cake recipe from Gail Duff - she describes it as light and very crumbly, more a cross between cake and shortbread.

Dairy-free Vinegar Cake

UK/US versions
225g (1/2lb or 2 cups) wholemeal/grain flour
2.5ml (1/2tsp) bicarbonate of soda (US=Baking soda)
125g (1/4lb/1/2cup) vegetable marg/shortening
125g (1/4lb/1/2cup) brown or Barbados sugar
50g (2oz/1/3cup)raisins
50g (2oz/1/3cup) sultanas/white raisins (muscats)
30ml (2tbls) malt or cider vinegar
90ml (6tbls) natural apple juice
extra margarine/shortening for greasing
450g (1lb/3cup) loaf tin/bread pan

Heat the oven to gas mark 4/180C (350F). Put the flour and soda into a bowl and rub in the margarine. Toss in the sugar, raisins and sultanas (white raisins) with your fingers. Make a well in the centre and pour in the vinegar and apple juice. Mix everything to a dough and press it into a greased 450g (1lb) loaf tin (3 cup bread pan). Put the cake into the oven for 1 hour Turn the heat to gas mark 2/150C (300F) and continue cooking for a further 15 minutes. Very carefully turn out the cake onto a wire rack. It will be very crumbly, but will hold together better as it cools.

When I used to make it I held it together with icing. And I had a chocolate version too, but I'm not sure where I've put that recipe.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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I rather think Pete's receipe was originally out of the "More With LEss" cookbook put out in the mid-1970s by the Central Committee of the Mennonite CHurch. I think I saw a revised version of the book at a UNICEF stand the other day.

It is an excellent cake and we've used it a lot, and all three children liked it too. Good cookbook in general, as well.

In any case, you can also top the cake with a mixture of brown sugar, butter (or margerine) and crushed walnuts/grated coconut/something smiliar and run it under the broiler just until the topping starts to bubble. WHich may be what the children liked, rather than the cake itself, of course, but whatever works...

John

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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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I was wanting to try a recipe posted some time ago by one of our UK Shipmates. It calls for demerara(sp?) sugar. Is there a US equilavent or adequate substitute?

Thanks in advance.

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I upped mine. Up yours.
Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?

Posts: 12001 | From: between keyboard and chair | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged



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