homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools
Thread closed  Thread closed


Post new thread  
Thread closed  Thread closed
My profile login | | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   » Ship's Locker   » Limbo   » Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course (Page 17)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  ...  33  34  35 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

 - Posted      Profile for KenWritez   Email KenWritez   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I got two cookery books as presents - one, recipes in the style of various authors. Mildly amusing. Possibly the best is the Irvine Walsh Fuckin Chocolate Cake.

I Googled said cake, but got no joy. Any info on author & book title?

quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
And one, which appears to have been written by harrupmphing old fogey, which begins each recipe by explaining how to kill and butcher the bird/animal to be cooked.

Is that by Robert Farrar Capon?

quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Oh, and if you want fancy stuff like pastry, you phone up A Woman* and ply her with gin.

Well duh! Of course! And if you need any animal killed, you phone up a Man and ply him with some strong drink and a peek of cleavage*.

======
My cleavage has yet impress any man... or woman. I'm about ready to demand my money back from Sine for that "How to Score" magazine he sold me.

Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
rugasaw
Shipmate
# 7315

 - Posted      Profile for rugasaw   Email rugasaw   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I ate christmas dinner at my brother's house. He smoked a standing prime rib roast. It was a little over done and turned out medium instead of medium rare. For new years eve I am going over to his house to show him how to make deer chile. On the same note Firenze can I have a word with you about that book?

--------------------
Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

Posts: 2716 | From: Houston | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

 - Posted      Profile for Roseofsharon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Googling Irvine Wesh got me this book.

[ 28. December 2006, 08:12: Message edited by: Roseofsharon ]

--------------------
Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

Posts: 3060 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

 - Posted      Profile for Roseofsharon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
Googling Irvine Wesh got me this book.

That was Welsh, with an 'e', and an 'i'.
I'm not well this morning!

--------------------
Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

Posts: 3060 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
The gralloch your dinner cookbook is called Countryman's Cooking by W.M.W. Fowler, Ludlow; Excellent Press, 2006 [orig pub 1965] ISBN 1900318296.

The other title is Kafka's Soup: a complete history of world literature in 14 recipes by Mark Crick, Orlando, Harcourt Inc, 2006. ISBN 0151012830.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
The gralloch your dinner cookbook is called Countryman's Cooking by W.M.W. Fowler, Ludlow; Excellent Press, 2006 [orig pub 1965] ISBN 1900318296.

Sounds just the thing for my parents. It will complement the Food for Free by Richard Mabey* I bought them when it first came out. Thank you.

* I don't recommend the acorn coffee.

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

 - Posted      Profile for Keren-Happuch   Author's homepage   Email Keren-Happuch   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
What can I do with about 1/4 of a jar of leftover mincemeat?

I suggested various things to my mum but in the end, b's gf turned up with a nut roast she'd made herself so no need.

--------------------
Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Amazing Grace

High Church Protestant
# 95

 - Posted      Profile for Amazing Grace   Email Amazing Grace   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I have just one thing to say. Soup.

So far, Artichoke and Bacon; Curried Vegetable with Crispy Chorizo; Chinese Chicken and Mushroom; North African Spiced Tomato and Vegetable.

It's cold, it's December, I drank too much last night. I just want to be left alone with my soup.

I made Italian Wedding soup last night. (Actually it was my easy-peasy version, with meatballs and chopped chard provided courtesy of Trader Joe's.) It's cold, it's December, I've got something resembling a cold, I ate a lot over Christmas weekend; chicken-vegetable soup is my friend.

Curried lentil for New Year's.

Charlotte

--------------------
WTFWED? "Remember to always be yourself, unless you suck" - the Gator
Memory Eternal! Sheep 3, Phil the Wise Guy, and Jesus' Evil Twin in the SoF Nativity Play

Posts: 6593 | From: Sittin' by the dock of the [SF] bay | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Low Treason
Shipmate
# 11924

 - Posted      Profile for Low Treason   Email Low Treason   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
What can I do with about 1/4 of a jar of leftover mincemeat?

Mixed with apple and the remains of the cranberry sauce, it makes a great pie filling

(edited because MD failed to take proper care with the original)

[ 29. December 2006, 17:04: Message edited by: My Duck ]

--------------------
He brought me to the banqueting house, and His banner over me was love.

Posts: 1914 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

 - Posted      Profile for babybear   Email babybear   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
You don't have to do anything with it just now. It will keep for quite some time.

You could keep it til February and add apples, and make it into a Christmas Crumble.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
welsh dragon

Shipmate
# 3249

 - Posted      Profile for welsh dragon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I have decided to brine my duck. It has been sitting in a potful of cold water, happily defrosting surrounded by orange quarters, onion quarters, coriander seeds, juniper berries, quite a lot of salt, sugar,honey and pepper, a cinnamon stick, some cloves and a fair bit of parsley.

I am now wondering whether I should
a) stick it in the fridge to dry out the skin before I cook it tomorrow
b) cook it slowly at a low temperature and then put it in the fridge and then cook it at a very high heat tomorrow (which would follow one Nigella suggestion)
c)leave it in its nice very cold bath overnight and then cook it nice and slow tomorrow and then give it a bit of a blast at the end

(Just wondering who knows about brined birds on the Ship. Any ideas Ken?)

Posts: 5352 | From: ebay | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

 - Posted      Profile for KenWritez   Email KenWritez   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by welsh dragon:
(Just wondering who knows about brined birds on the Ship. Any ideas Ken?)

Hmmm, I usually proceed straight from brine to full cooking, so I'm unfamiliar with brining and then waiting. My instinct is to go with a modified B. It's parcooking (partial cooking), which is a traditional method, I've just never done it with duck. I don't understand the reason for the waiting period between the parcook and the final high heat cook (unless it has to do with flavor development), so I would go straight from the first to the second.

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
rugasaw
Shipmate
# 7315

 - Posted      Profile for rugasaw   Email rugasaw   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
What ever you decide rememberto rinse the duck and pat it dry before cooking. If you do not rinse the skin will be extremely salty.

--------------------
Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

Posts: 2716 | From: Houston | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
welsh dragon

Shipmate
# 3249

 - Posted      Profile for welsh dragon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Ah. I popped it in the oven about half an hour ago (for the slow cooking with final blast) and the skin has already started to cook. Never mind. We will see how we get on with the alty skin!

Maria

Posts: 5352 | From: ebay | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
On the other hand, the salt should act to crisp it.

Are you able to say yet, WD, how it's turned out?

I will be doing something duck-based on New Years Day, so I'm interested.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
welsh dragon

Shipmate
# 3249

 - Posted      Profile for welsh dragon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I will report back this afternoon! I used a variation of a recipe for turkey - which didn't say to rinse it.
Posts: 5352 | From: ebay | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
welsh dragon

Shipmate
# 3249

 - Posted      Profile for welsh dragon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
It turned out rather well! The only problem was that the people for whom I was cooking it did not turn up, which was a shame. I had used 2&1/2 oz in total salt in the brine, which I think is on the low side anyhow, and the skin did not taste overly salty, despite my failure to rinse it, but was flavoursome.

[ 30. December 2006, 21:43: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]

Posts: 5352 | From: ebay | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Ingrates.

Anyway, I think it will be Duck Bits tomorrow, as I doubt my competency to tackle a whole bird after the kind of New Year's Eve we usually have.

I expect it will be with either honey & grapes, or orange & marmalade.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
AdamPater
Sacristan of the LavaLamp
# 4431

 - Posted      Profile for AdamPater   Email AdamPater   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Photo Geek:
I need advice. I'm a horrible cook. I want to learn how to make a proper roast (moist and tender) like mom made. The Christmas roast beef was a disaster [Hot and Hormonal] . Tomorrow I plan to have a small 3 lb. pork loin roast for dinner and I don't want another disaster. Help [Help] [Help]



--------------------
Put not your trust in princes.

Posts: 4894 | From: On the left of the big pink bit. | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
marmot

Mountain mammal
# 479

 - Posted      Profile for marmot   Email marmot   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Photo Geek, check your PMs. I have a couple of files for you.

--------------------
Join me in "The Legion of Bad Monkeys"

Posts: 2754 | From: The land of Saint Damien | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Photo Geek
Shipmate
# 9757

 - Posted      Profile for Photo Geek   Email Photo Geek   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Marmot,

I have sent you my Email address.

--------------------
"Liberal Christian" is not an oxymoron.

Posts: 242 | From: Southern Ohio, US | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
les@BALM
The Ship's Visionary
# 11237

 - Posted      Profile for les@BALM   Author's homepage   Email les@BALM   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
quote:
Originally posted by les@BALM:
Anyone know the best way to cook a 5kg duck? and what is the best sauce to have with it? Thought orange is best, but can't find a decent recipe?

Duck (hahahahaha) is a vewwy wich-- no, wait, stop, I'm doing my Elmer Fudd Cooks impersonation.

Rewind, try again.

Easy Twice-Cooked Duck
Basic Roast Duck w/ Orange Sauce
Brined, Steamed Duck

Some notes:

Duck fat is a wondrous elixir--don't discard any of it. Instead, refrigerate any left over and use for frying or sauteeing veg or adding in small amounts for richness to soups or stews. French fries done in duck fat are excellent, AIUI.

You didn't say if your duck is wild or domesticated. If wild, your bird will likely have a stronger taste, so be aware.

More than you want to know about game bird storage and prep.

I don't recommend stuffing the cavity of any bird to be cooked. Too much chance of undercooked (and thus potentially unsafe) stuffing and overcooked meat. Make your stuffing in a separate pan. I'd put only aromatics (herbs, zests, etc.) in the cavity. This applies to all birds: chicken, turkey, pheasant, whatever.

Cooking meat solely by time is rarely a good idea. "Bake at X degrees for Y minutes" can easily lead to under- or over-cooking because all ovens vary in their temperature stability, even when set to the same mark. The only sure way to know when your meat is done is to use an instant-read probe thermometer, something like this instant-read thermometer. Before putting the meat into the oven or grill, drive the probe into center mass of whatever meat is to be cooked; stay clear of any bones. This nifty gadget allows you to monitor the meat's doneness.

Duck should be cooked to an internal temperature of... well, there's room for discussion. Cook's Illustrated says 160 degrees F. The US gubmint says 165 degrees F. Split the difference and you should be okay.

Be aware of carry-over heat. When you remove the bird from the oven, it continues to cook and its internal temperature will rise several degrees. I'd say pull the bird out when its internal temp reaches 158 degrees and let carry-over heat take it to 160-165.

Don't cut into a hot piece of meat immediately after removing it from the oven, or you'll bleed out its juices and the meat will be dry. (This goes for all meats.) Let it rest undisturbed 5-15 minutes (longer for larger pieces like whole roasts).

Ken, I followed the link you gave for Basic Roast Duck and enjoyed an excellent Christmas dinner, the duck was awesome, thanks again.

--------------------
il sole d'Italia mi è rimasto nel cure
Italia campioni del mondo ****

Tiggs the cat.

Posts: 1863 | From: Canada, eh! | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

 - Posted      Profile for KenWritez   Email KenWritez   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Wooo! Thanks for the news! [Yipee]

I worked my little fingers to nubbins posting those links--nubbins I tell you!

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Uncharted territory here.

I have just put together a casserole of some buffalo I got in a farmers' market a few months ago.

I sealed it in hot oil with some fatty bacon cubes, onions and carrots, and then covered with beef stock and a dash of Worcestershire.

Anything else I should add to the stock? What would be a good accompaniment?

I have looked at web recipes, but they seem mainly to deal in throwing great slabs of it over a barbeque, presumably while singing Yippee Ay Yo a lot.

[ 03. January 2007, 17:09: Message edited by: Firenze ]

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

 - Posted      Profile for KenWritez   Email KenWritez   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
You're looking at the wrong sites.

It should be "Yipee Ay Yay."

Buffalo is new to me, too, so I'm guessing here. I know it's extremely lean, and fat carries flavor, so be aware you might want to boost your flavor compounds. You haven't said how much meat you've got nor what taste you're seeking, so I'm not sure what to advise you other than the basics: Red wine reduction, baked garlic smashed and added, bay leaf or two, maybe some beef bouillon and a pat or two of butter if the bacon fat is insufficient.

Is your bacon smoked or unsmoked?

Toward the end of cooking, I would remove and discard the veg, then add new amounts of the same, roasted in a hot oven just before use, as the previously cooked veg will have given up its flavor already.

[ 03. January 2007, 17:21: Message edited by: KenWritez ]

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
It is quite a small quantity - just for two.

What is in there in the veg line is onion - which will stew into the sauce - and carrot chunked large. But it sounds as if more onion, roasted, plus chunks of roasted butternut squash could go in.

As to wine - I have slightly declining '96 burgundy which is in the cooking pile, but decided this wasn't its moment (whereas I think a large potroast of brisket could be). Given that I am adding sweet vegetables, I think finish with some sweet soy or barbeque sauce.

Thanks for the steer (as we say on the prairie).

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Reporting back.

It was majorly delish. Lighter than beef, less gamey than venison. It was definately not one to do with wine: much better pushed towards the smokey/tomatoey/piquant end of the spectrum. The American fries were not inappropriate, but next time I think the cheesy polenta or other corn-based product.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

 - Posted      Profile for Chorister   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
"The boar's head as I understand is the finest dish in all the land" - so says ye olde carole.

Recent events in Creamtealand have made me sorely tempted to try it out. Has anyone on here ever tried it, or has the recipe (and the desire to eat it) completely died out?

Here, we had roast local pheasant for one of our Christmas meals, as it is my son's favourite. A brace of pheasant will do 4 people, but watch out for shot!

--------------------
Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

Posts: 34626 | From: Cream Tealand | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

 - Posted      Profile for chukovsky   Author's homepage   Email chukovsky   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I've not had a head of boar, but pieces (ribs/chops/a leg I think) which were lovely - very unlike pork, much richer but not really fatty, and very flavoursome. We just cooked them like you would pork (i.e. fairly well).

--------------------
This space left intentionally blank. Do not write on both sides of the paper at once.

Posts: 6842 | From: somewhere else | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

 - Posted      Profile for Laura   Email Laura   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
You're looking at the wrong sites.

It should be "Yipee Ay Yay."

Kenwritez, in the famed Ghost Riders in the Sky, the ghost riders sing both (phonetically) "yippee-eye-oh" AND "yippee-eye-ae!", so either "yippee-ay-oh" or "yippee-ay-aye" are correct, though never "yippee-ay-yo" or "yay".

"Yo" is a demotic American greeting, popular in certain US subcultures and with those who emulate them; and "yay" is a general US expression of happiness. Neither has any place in a ghost rider's cry. Please make a note of it.

Now to the buffalo.

Buffalo mince can be treated like any minced beef and done the same with. It is not terribly gamey, generally. I hvae buffalo burgers every now and then at a place I like to stop in every now and then.

Buffalo meat can similarly be treated like similar beef cuts, keeping in mind that it is typically leaner than beef.

--------------------
Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Meg the Red
Shipmate
# 11838

 - Posted      Profile for Meg the Red   Email Meg the Red   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Ditto Laura on the the buffalo burgers - love 'em! We have a lot of bison farms 'round these parts, and so it's easy to get a variety of buffalo bits, including sausage. On the suggestion of a nice lady at the farmer's market, I bought some of her buffalo Italian sausage and used in in the stuffing for the Christmas turkey -yummy.

I'm just contemplating what to do with the lovely ring of buffalo garlic sausage in the freezer; maybe I'll revert to my German roots and steam it with sauerkraut. [Yipee]

--------------------
Chocoholic Canuckistani Cyclopath

Posts: 1126 | From: Rat Creek | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I'm not sure of the provenance of the buffalo I ate. Maybe, like so many novel foodstuffs in Scotland these days, it came from eastern Europe. Perhaps it was part of the Danube bison.
Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

 - Posted      Profile for KenWritez   Email KenWritez   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
Kenwritez, in the famed Ghost Riders in the Sky, the ghost riders sing both (phonetically) "yippee-eye-oh" AND "yippee-eye-ae!", so either "yippee-ay-oh" or "yippee-ay-aye" are correct, though never "yippee-ay-yo" or "yay".

Ah, Laura, I fear you have fallen sway under the hypnotic, glowing red eyes of the thundering Devil's Herd churning across the raging sky. Understandable, really; you're not to be blamed, no matter what anyone else says.

I cite as my authority no less a personage than Johnny Cash, who trumps any other claimant and who clearly sings "yippee ay yay" in the first chorus.

Please make a note of it.

Thankseverso.

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

 - Posted      Profile for Laura   Email Laura   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Kenwritez:

I hang my head in deepest shame.

Then cowboy change your ways today or with us you will ride Trying to catch the Devil's herd, across these endless skies

Yippie yi Ohhhhh
Yippie yi Yaaaaay

Ghost Riders in the sky
Ghost Riders in the sky
Ghost Riders in the sky


--------------------
Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
rugasaw
Shipmate
# 7315

 - Posted      Profile for rugasaw   Email rugasaw   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Buffalo burgers are good. As far as the buffalo sausage I would slice up some potatos and onions and saute them. Slice and fry the sausage. And enjoy.

As far as the cowboy yodel goes Johnny Cash can say it anyway he likes. All others must be wearing boots and preferably waving a cowboy hat while yelling it. [Biased]

--------------------
Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

Posts: 2716 | From: Houston | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

 - Posted      Profile for Huia   Email Huia   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I never feel very confident cooking chicken because my mother never cooked it. She said roasted chicken looked like ccoked baby and she couldn't do it.

So, what parts of the chicken are the giblets? (I tried Google but got a lots of unhelpful information).

Thanks, o knowledgable ones.

Huia

--------------------
Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
ananke
Shipmate
# 10059

 - Posted      Profile for ananke   Email ananke   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Giblets = guts I think.

My favourite method for roast chicken is to rub the skin (and as far under the skin, between the muscles, as possible) with a mixture of butter, herbs, salt and pepper. Then I put some more of that into the cavity with a lemon cut in half. Then roast at a fairly high heat until juices from the leg run clear.

The other way I do it is to chop it into pieces then cover in a char siu mix. I generally use char siu sauce, oyster sauce, soy sauce, mirin and honey. Then bake at a really high heat until done.

--------------------
...and I bear witness, this grace, this prayer so long forgotten.

A Perfect Circle - Magdalena

Posts: 617 | From: australia | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
So, what parts of the chicken are the giblets?

If I buy a chicken 'with giblets' I expect to get the neck, gizzard, heart and liver.

These I usually put in the tin around the chicken: they roast to a shrivel, but contribute their juices to the gravy. (You discard them afterwards).

On the subject of sauce/gravy: I line the roasting tin with tinfoil, with sufficient to go over the top of the bird (butter/grease the foil before you place the chicken on it, and try and wrap it loosely - but well sealed - so that it doesn't stick to it). Anyway, what you should have is a chicken in a little foil tent in the oven, with whatever aromatics - garlic, quartered onion, lemon, butter, spices etc - you want to flavour it with. Half an hour or so before serving, open the foil. You should have a moist - albeit pale - bird, with a fair amount of liquid around it. Carefully pour this off into a saucepan (and tip the bird, so that juices drain out of the cavity).

The juices will have fat on the surface. This I usually skim off and ladle back over the exposed chicken, which is returned, unwrapped and thus basted, to a hot oven to brown.

Meanwhile, add to white wine or French vermouth (this last is very good if you have roasted the chicken with tarragon, say). Bubble the saucepan until the gravy is reduced by about half. At this point I often stir in a tablespoon of creme fraiche.

The chicken should now be crisp-skinned, but so tender that it scarcely needs carving, it just falls apart.

Well, that's what I'm doing this evening.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
When I roast a chicken I cover the breast with cheesecloth (I think the Brits call it butter muslin.). Then I saturate the cheesecloth with melted butter. This keeps the breast from drying out.

Be sure to use 100% cotton cheesecloth. Something that's part synthetic might melt.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Or cover the bird in strips of streaky bacon. Remove for the last 15/20 minutes of browning - by which time they will deliciously crisp. If I'm doing this, I usually put pieces of banana, wrapped in more bacon in the roasting tin as well and/or stuff the chicken with a mixture of banana mashed with breadcrumbs.

You need to skim a bit more fat off the juices with this one. But making up the gravy with orange juice does well.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

 - Posted      Profile for Huia   Email Huia   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Thanks ananke, Firenze and Moo. I'm making some chicken soup to start with, but I think I might try a roast when I have visitors. With only me to eat up the bits I could get a bit tired of roast chicken, though I suppose it could be minces and made into a pie or something.

Huia

--------------------
Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Low Treason
Shipmate
# 11924

 - Posted      Profile for Low Treason   Email Low Treason   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Having been dared by divers shipmates, and being in an unusually benign mood due to a good meal and some fine wine, I have decided to take the dare.

Does anyone have a recipe for chocolate soup?

A large virtual prize will be given for the most inventive/creative replies.

--------------------
He brought me to the banqueting house, and His banner over me was love.

Posts: 1914 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Huia, you could practice on poussin. Or on chicken pieces.

As intended for this evening, I did a whole bird in foil - with just garlic and a bay leaf for seasoning. It got probably about three-quarters of an hours more cooking than it needed, but, thanks to the method, didn't dry out, just got even more tender than usual. It matched superbly with the '03 Cava.

However, tomorrow is fresh tuna steaks, which I am not so practised with. Any suggestions welcome.

[ 06. January 2007, 20:42: Message edited by: Firenze ]

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
It depends on how pink you can face your tuna - the TV chefs go for very pink, which my daughter won't eat. It can dry out if you grill it to go brown throughout. I find it's more tender if you poach it or bake it in a parcel, like your chicken recipe above.

I've also tried and liked treating it like steak au poivre, sort of getting a crust on to hold in the inner moisture?

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
ananke
Shipmate
# 10059

 - Posted      Profile for ananke   Email ananke   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Curiosity is right - tuna is a steaky fish. I like it marinaded in teriyaki or with garlic cream sauce.

--------------------
...and I bear witness, this grace, this prayer so long forgotten.

A Perfect Circle - Magdalena

Posts: 617 | From: australia | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
rugasaw
Shipmate
# 7315

 - Posted      Profile for rugasaw   Email rugasaw   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Tuna steaks yum. Combine 1/2 cup soy,1/2 cup honey, and 1/4 cup wasabi. Use Half for dipping and the rest to marinade. Sear the Tuna steaks in sesame oil. You want rare to medium any more done just isn't worth it.

Huia a roast chicken carcus makes a good chicken stock. I am sure a roast chicken would make a good begining of a really good soup. On the other hand it is time consuming.

Hmmm chocolate soup. If Pata stops by this thread I am likely to be required to try and make any posted recipes.

--------------------
Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

Posts: 2716 | From: Houston | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

 - Posted      Profile for Welease Woderwick   Email Welease Woderwick   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
There are many, many chocolate soup recipes available but most seem to be dessert soups, which is cheating a bit. However, all is not lost, if you do a search for chocolate mole sauce you will find a savoury Mexican chocolate sauce [usually served with chicken or steak] which could easily be adapted as a soup. I rather fancy adding coriander/cilantro leaf to it.

Sadly I won't be able to eat any, damned allergies, but it sounds good.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Low Treason
Shipmate
# 11924

 - Posted      Profile for Low Treason   Email Low Treason   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
There are many, many chocolate soup recipes available but most seem to be dessert soups, which is cheating a bit. However, all is not lost, if you do a search for chocolate mole sauce you will find a savoury Mexican chocolate sauce [usually served with chicken or steak] which could easily be adapted as a soup. I rather fancy adding coriander/cilantro leaf to it.

Actually that was what was going through my mind - I have heard that Mexican recipes use chocolate and of course cocoa powder is entirely sugar-free. I seem to remember in that excellent film 'Chocolat' the heroine made a feative dish of chicken with some sort of chocolate sauce...

--------------------
He brought me to the banqueting house, and His banner over me was love.

Posts: 1914 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
wanders off to find Mexican cookery book

Your chocolate sauce with chicken was probably a version of Mole de Guajolote

This is similar to the recipe I have and saves me typing it out. I haven't tried this, but it looks interesting.

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Laura
General nuisance
# 10

 - Posted      Profile for Laura   Email Laura   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Speaking of cowboys, I made buckwheat pancakes this a.m. Talking with elderly relatives, buckwheat used to be far more commonly used in the US. It's tasty, gluten-free, has protein and loads of fiber. Why is it so little used here anymore? In europe, buckwheat - groats and the wheat are used for all sorts of dishes -- probably kashi is the best known. But you'd think something so tasty and healthy would be more widely eaten here.

--------------------
Love is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence. - Erich Fromm

Posts: 16883 | From: East Coast, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  ...  33  34  35 
 
Post new thread  
Thread closed  Thread closed
Open thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
follow ship of fools on twitter
buy your ship of fools postcards
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
 
  ship of fools