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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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In a similar vein, I used to make orange glazed chicken quite a bit. Now I only make it when we have visitors stay and I have bought marmalade for the visitors.

For 1 person (extremely easy to increase quantities)
1 breast of chicken
1 Tsp of marmalade (orange or lemon, or even lime)
1 clove of garlic
1 tsp coriander (cilantro) seeds
1Tsp orange juice
little salt & pepper

Crush the coriander seeds and then the add the garlic and keep crushing, add the marmalade, the orange juice and season.

Spoon the graze over the chicken and cook. Half way through spoon the juices over, and again near the end of cooking. Serve on a bed of rice, or with baked potatoes and green salad.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Speaking of oranges...how do we think a casserole of lamb, orange (well, clementine) onion, carrot and red pepper would work?

It's what I have in the house, so I'm keen to try.

I feel there should be some spices in there - I suppose the usual coriander/cumin axis might do.

If anyone knows a recipe vaguely resembling this, I'd take suggestions on seasoning.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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It sounds too sweet as it is. I think that you would need to add some lemon juice or some vinegar.

Perhaps something along the lines of a Moroccan Lamb & Apricot Stew with the apricots being substituted with the oranges, and reducing the amount of water. I could see that working rather well, especially if you leave some of the oranges out until about 10 minutes before the end of cooking.

Oh yes, served with cous cous or rice mixed through with some peas or chopped spring onions.

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Yangtze
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# 4965

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I have a feeling this kind of pancake thing may be so common in the States as to not be worthy of comment, but it was new to me and it really did make the most delicious, speedy supper.

Sweetcorn Cakes

Take one small tin of sweetcorn and blitz it in a food processor.

Stir in one egg and some flour until it gets to pancake batter consistency - sort of thick sloppiness. I only had cornflour which worked fine, plain flour should work too. Or some kind of gluten free stuff if that's what's needed.

Season. Dried herbs may also be added. (Actually fresh ones would work well too)

Heat olive oil in a frying pan till really quite hot (but don't burn) - dollop in the mixture and spread flat. (I made one huge pancake but smaller ones would probably be better). Cook till golden and then flip and cook the other side.

Eat with a spicy chutney. Would also go well with greens.

It basically comes out all light and fluffy - sort of like a blini texture. And is most definitely speedy. One I shall be remembering.

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Anna B
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# 1439

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Let's talk pickles!

I'm seeing the price of little pickling cucumbers drop around here, and am thinking of making dill pickles layered, Russian-style, with blackcurrant leaves (I have a superabundance of the latter).

So, how do you pickle?

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Emma on the Question thread about freezing portions of food, and also yogurt and cream.

I wouldn't freeze yogurt unless it was mixed through with something, like curry. Double cream, whipped up will freeze okay, but is better if it is an ingredient in something else.

Some fruits and vegetables, especially very watery ones, don't freeze well. As they freeze the cell structures get ruptured by the frozen water. When it is defrosted the fruit or veg can turn rather mushy. But this is not a problem is you are freezing purees, soups or stews.

Cooked potatoes can be frozen very well, especially as a mash, in thin slices or in stews/soups. To freeze thin slices of potato well lay the slices out on a baking sheet and freeze uncovered. The following day, then they are totally frozen, remove from the baking sheet, put in a bag and seal. These slices can later be put on the top of a dish of food to give a hotpot like top. Brush the top with a little butter.

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HenryT

Canadian Anglican
# 3722

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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
I have a feeling this kind of pancake thing may be so common in the States as to not be worthy of comment, but it was new to me ....
Sweetcorn Cakes
...
It basically comes out all light and fluffy - sort of like a blini texture. And is most definitely speedy. One I shall be remembering.

It's a modern descendant of the medieval tansy cake circa 1430 in the Liber Cure Cocorum, Sloan MS 1986.

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HenryT

Canadian Anglican
# 3722

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
...about freezing portions of food...

I have a book titled Will it Freeze by Joan Hood; I also have two editions of Putting Food By (PFB) authors Ruth Hertzberg, Janet Greene, and Beatrice Vaughan. Amazon seems to have all of these available.

About the only things that really don't freeze at all are emulsions, such as mayonnaise and some other sauces like hollandaise. Salads don't freeze, as the lettuce wilts. The "don't freeze well" list in PFB includes:
  • hard-cooked egg whites get rubbery
  • cooked pasta loses texture
  • cooked soft meringue toppings get tough and shrink
  • cheese-and-crumb toppings get soggy and dull; add them to the thawed dish
  • custards "weep" - which is emulsion again


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"Perhaps an invincible attachment to the dearest rights of man may, in these refined, enlightened days, be deemed old-fashioned" P. Henry, 1788

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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I used to freeze soups and stews without the potatoes. While the stew thawed, I would cook the potatoes and add them.

Moo

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R.A.M.
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I often freeze cooked pasta, it isn't as good, but it is incredibly convenient. I especially like doing cheesy pasta to microwave as the stodgiest, most convenient, comfort food ever.

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Ferdzy
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Anna B, I make pickles pretty much every year. This is my standard recipe for dill pickles:

Dill Pickles

I've never heard of putting currant leaves in with pickles, although I have heard of putting in grape leaves. It's supposed to keep them crisp. I assume currant leaves would perform the same function. If you want to use them, just wash them well and put them in, I guess.

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Anna B
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Ferdzy, I have a cookbook on the subject (_The Joy of Pickling_) that says that oak or sour cherry leaves will also work. The black currant leaves are supposed to impart a subtle, smoky flavor.

(My little son and I just finished preparing our first cucumber pickles ever. He helped layer the blackcurrant leaves, cucumbers, homemade pickling mix, and garlic in the crock, and also helped to pour in the brine.)

My mom laughed and laughed when she heard about the sour cherry leaves. Every year the birds strip her tree, leaving her with no fruit and a lot of leaves. Finally, she's got a way to use them.

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Ferdzy
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Mm, birds and cherries, yes. We go to a strawberry U-pick where the farmer has his strawberry fields surrounded by cherry trees. He doesn't bother trying to pick the cherries; they're there to keep the birds out of the strawberries.

I love pickles, most kinds. Have you ever had the bright pink middle eastern pickled turnips? Yum.

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Anna B
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quote:
Originally posted by Ferdzy:
Mm, birds and cherries, yes. We go to a strawberry U-pick where the farmer has his strawberry fields surrounded by cherry trees. He doesn't bother trying to pick the cherries; they're there to keep the birds out of the strawberries.

I love pickles, most kinds. Have you ever had the bright pink middle eastern pickled turnips? Yum.

That sounds delicious.

On the farm back in Norway where my mother-in-law grew up, her brother grows strawberries, and I have always been amazed that the birds seem uninterested in them. The area is covered in cherry trees which also go untouched. The reason, it was explained to me once, is that given a choice between cherries and wild blueberries, which also grow around there, the birds will always pick the latter!

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Henry Troup:
[*]cheese-and-crumb toppings get soggy and dull; add them to the thawed dish

You can freeze bags of crumbs mixed with grated cheese separately, and add them when you reheat the dish.

[ 28. June 2007, 22:27: Message edited by: Roseofsharon ]

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bush baptist
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# 12306

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I have a lovely lot of capsicums (green and red) to deal with, and no-one to eat them up. I have a notion that I can preserve them by roasting and then putting them in oil. I've googled re: this, but haven't exactly got the info I want. For example, do I have to peel them after roasting? Is getting rid of the skin the only reason for roasting? How long would they keep? I'd like something I can put on pizzas, or cook with, or put in salads, and I'd like them to last three or four months, if possible. Can anyone help?

[ 29. June 2007, 09:44: Message edited by: bush baptist ]

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Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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/random aside

I had to look up on wikipedia what a capsicum is.... From the article I think we (england) call them peppers. Red and green and orange peppers, and the thing/hot ones we call chilli peppers.

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bush baptist
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# 12306

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Yes, peppers -- sweet peppers as opposed to hot peppers -- that is, only sweet in the sense that celery (for example) is sweet. [Smile]

[ 29. June 2007, 10:59: Message edited by: bush baptist ]

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basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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quote:
Originally posted by bush baptist:
I have a lovely lot of capsicums (green and red) to deal with, and no-one to eat them up. I have a notion that I can preserve them by roasting and then putting them in oil. I've googled re: this, but haven't exactly got the info I want. For example, do I have to peel them after roasting? Is getting rid of the skin the only reason for roasting? How long would they keep? I'd like something I can put on pizzas, or cook with, or put in salads, and I'd like them to last three or four months, if possible. Can anyone help?

Yes, you can save them after roasting them. We usually call these bell peppers - try that for a search phrase. Here's one sample recipe.
They're okay in salads but IMO better in sauces. Cut up and saute an italian sausage or two and add to a roasted red bell pepper or so in your favorite tomato sauce recipe. I'd serve that with penne.
Roasted peppers are also a classic on an antipasto platter.

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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bush baptist: I've had some luck freezing peppers, if first cut up into small pieces and wrapped tightly. You can then take them out of the freezer and saute them, add to sauces, etc.

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Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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Why do they peel them? I think when I have roasted peppers or cut them up and put them in cooking thingies I've never peeled them... Should I?
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I would have thought so. The effect of roasting is to char* the skin, but render the flesh soft and sweet. You don't want burnt bits, so put the still warm roasted peppers in a plastic bag until they cool a bit. It's then very easy to peel off the blackened skin.

*(If the skin isn't blackened, then I would say they are not sufficiently roasted).

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bush baptist
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Thank you all -- I went out this morning and picked every last one, and tonight's the roasting! Pasta and antepasto for the rest of winter! [Smile] (which won't be all that long if spring comes early again -- which it's looking like it will do.)

[ 30. June 2007, 08:44: Message edited by: bush baptist ]

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bush baptist
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# 12306

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Roast capsicums very nice indeed -- gluttony-inducing niceness. I think there won't be any trouble disposing of the bountiful harvest. And today really is looking springlike, which is scarily early. I hope we get some more winter so I can enjoy winter cooking.
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basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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(footnote about saving your harvest)
You must refrigerate these - pack 'em in oil but don't try to save them in the pantry. That way lies botulism poisoning.

If you know that, sorry - but I realized that none of us had actually said it.

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bush baptist
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basso -- thank you so much for your keen eye (in noting what hadn't been said, and your thoughtfulness in alerting me to the botulism danger. Yes, I would have kept them in the fridge anyway, but the hundred-to-one chance that I might slip up (say, if the fridge got crowded some day, and I moved them 'temporarily' and then looked at them again a week later) makes me very glad you're here! [Yipee]
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The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
# 5638

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How do people soften butter?

When I had my baking dilemma a couple of weeks ago (the help for which I received here I am still grateful for) the weather was warm so there was no problem. I just put it on the window-sill for an hour or two and it creamed with the sugar like a treat. Now the weather isn't so warm, and although I haven't been storing my butter in the fridge, room temperature is not ideal. It isn't cold enough in the house to warrant the turning on on radiators. I can use the butter as it is but it will just take a while. Does anybdoy have any butter-softening tips for when I'm baking in the bleak mid-winter?

Thank you.

quote:
Originally posted by bush baptist:
Yes, peppers -- sweet peppers as opposed to hot peppers -- that is, only sweet in the sense that celery (for example) is sweet. [Smile]

In which case I ought to probably point out that my recipe earlier for stuffed peppers was for pepper peppers and not hot peppers. [Frown]

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Low Treason
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# 11924

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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Saint Bertelin:
[QB] How do people soften butter?

When I had my baking dilemma a couple of weeks ago (the help for which I received here I am still grateful for) the weather was warm so there was no problem. I just put it on the window-sill for an hour or two and it creamed with the sugar like a treat. Now the weather isn't so warm, and although I haven't been storing my butter in the fridge, room temperature is not ideal. It isn't cold enough in the house to warrant the turning on on radiators. I can use the butter as it is but it will just take a while. Does anybdoy have any butter-softening tips for when I'm baking in the bleak mid-winter?

Thank you.

Why do you think God gave us the microwave? I find 30 seconds on defrost plus a minute or two standing is usually enough.

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Beautiful Dreamer
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# 10880

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Here is an awesome recipe for quesadillas.

Chop up chicken breasts. Douse with red wine, garlic, italian seasoning, butter, and Texas Pete hot sauce. Brown in pan. Put to the side.

Once you take the chicken out of the pan, put a flour tortilla with cheese on it. Once the cheese is melted, put pieces of chicken in cheese. Fold tortilla over. Flip over until cheese is thouroughly melted and both sides of tortilla are slightly brown. Take tortilla off and repeat until chicken is gone (will make about 4 quesadillas).

My husband loves this recipe.

[ 02. July 2007, 12:54: Message edited by: Beautiful_Dreamer ]

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Freelance Monotheist
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I have two bquestions for all you culinary buffs/whizzes.
Firstly: is strawberry upside down cake a viable option? Seeing as the fruit lets out juice on contact with sugar, I'm not sure it'd work!
Also, I need some help with my meringue making, as I followed a recipe (well, adapted it: 2 egg whites instead of 4 and about 2/3rds the amont of sugar, cookerd for 30 mins on 140 ° C) and the top went all crispy and golden and was delicious, but the middle was kind of mousse-like in texture. All I want is them to be firm all the way through, like the ones I buy from the bakery.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Freelance Monotheist:
I need some help with my meringue making,... the top went all crispy and golden and was delicious, but the middle was kind of mousse-like in texture.

30 minutes is too short for anything other than 'mousse meringuies'. But don't be fooled into thinking that the dessicated lumps of sugar and egg white sold in bakeries or supermarkets are meringues. Meringues are supposed to have a slightly squidgy middle section.

However, this is a matter of taste. Make your meringues and pop in the oven for 40 minutes. Turn off the oven, and leave the meringues there until the oven is completely cold. This will take them from being mousse into squidgy.

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Freelance Monotheist
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Thanks babybear, I'll try your way when I've got some more eggs.

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Sparrow
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I want to make a cake this weekend, probably an orange and lemon Victoria sponge. It's been pointed out to me that the oranges and lemons we buy in the supermarket have a wax coating to preserve their appearance - presumably I need to get rid of this before I scrape the zest off the fruit, but what's the best way to do this? Will just washing them be enough?

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Gill H

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# 68

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You should be able to buy unwaxed lemons - most supermarkets have them, though they may be in a pack of four rather than singly.

Don't know about oranges though. I'd probably go over them with a nailbrush or something?

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Petrified

Ship’s ballast
# 10667

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quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
You should be able to buy unwaxed lemons - most supermarkets have them, though they may be in a pack of four rather than singly.

Don't know about oranges though. I'd probably go over them with a nailbrush or something?

Unwaxed lemons seem to be more commonly available (Waitrose certainly do them) presumably for putting in drinks.
A scrub is supposed to remove the wax.

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Turn off the oven, and leave the meringues there until the oven is completely cold. This will take them from being mousse into squidgy.

That's a brilliant suggestion, babybear. I'm going to add a note in my cookbook.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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My Mam made tonnes of meringues for a number of years. She would taken them down to the church coffee morning, where they were raising funds for the centenary refurbishments of the building. People loved her fresh cream meringues.

However, she would not take any damaged ones down and she would server them to the family. I hate meringues now! I had far, far too many as a child to see them as anything other than sweet, icky 'leftovers'.

If you find that your meringues haven't come off cleanly from the parchment or greaseproof paper then don't worry. Bash them up a bit more, into bite sized pieces and mix with a whipped cream. You can add in fruit, strawberries or raspberries are particularly good. Or you could take some crystalised ginger, chop it finely and add that, along with a little bit of syrup. Put the dessert into a glass or crystal bowl (because it looks so pretty) and serve up.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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I believe that ice-cream is another possible addition to the dessert Babybear describes above.

Jengie

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Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jodi
Shipmate
# 2490

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quote:
Originally posted by Freelance Monotheist:
Firstly: is strawberry upside down cake a viable option? Seeing as the fruit lets out juice on contact with sugar, I'm not sure it'd work!

I don't know, but I've made sponge cakes before with a filling of slightly-cooked strawberries, all put together while both cake and filling are warm. You end up with a very soggy bottom half of the cake, but in a good way. It's even better with raspberries. The thought of the latter is making my mouth water!
Posts: 73 | From: UK | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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quote:
Originally posted by Freelance Monotheist:
Firstly: is strawberry upside down cake a viable option? Seeing as the fruit lets out juice on contact with sugar, I'm not sure it'd work!

I'm just hazarding a guess here, but I made a traditional pineapple upside-down cake for the first time last week, and I think the trick might be to make the cake in the traditional way. That is, to make the fruit "topping" first, and then pour the cake batter over it and bake. That would mean melting some butter, adding brown sugar and cooking until the sugar is melted and mixed in with the butter, then adding the fruit. At this point you could cook it down a little so that the strawberry juices mingle with the butter and sugar and make a sort of glaze. Then pour the cake batter on top, bake, and invert the cake over a platter.

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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On the subject of unwaxed lemons, you should find that organic lemons and oranges are nearly always unwaxed. And yes you do need to buy a pack rather than singly (very annoying) but I freeze leftover bits of lemon cut in to bits ready for my next Gin and Tonic. Perfect - ice and lemon in one!

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Sparrow
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# 2458

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Thanks for your helpful comments everyone, but I'm taking the path of least resistance. It's going to be chocolate.

[Big Grin]

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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We've got a lot of leftover veggies this week and I was intending to puree and freeze them for when the K-Glet starts solids (which will be soon), but I'm not sure whether everything we've got will be suitable - carrots, cauliflower etc, fine but what about broad beans? Even beetroot? Would that make his nappies purple?? I guess he'd have to be wrapped in bibs to keep it off his clothes!

Sorry if this is more parenting support than cooking - I wasn't sure where to put it.

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Ann

Curious
# 94

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Once K-G starts solids, nappies are going to change colour anyway. I'd check with your health visitor for food they recommend you wait before introducing; even if I could remember what I gave my children, the list changes and a 12-year out of date list of things may not be acceptable now.

I used to cook up batches of vegetables (separately), blitz them and freeze them into ice-cube trays which is enough for a portion. Then I could choose different veggies or (later when they ate more) combinations. When re-heating, make sure there are no hot-spots - stir thoroughly.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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I have lost one of my favorite recipes, and I hope some of you are familiar with it.

It is a fruit pudding. In the bottom of a baking dish you put a batter which has a huge amount of baking powder. You put the fruit on top of that, and then pour boiling liquid over it and bake it. The batter rises and engulfs the fruit.

I was thinking of making it with a mixture of nectarines and blueberries.

Moo

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
We've got a lot of leftover veggies this week and I was intending to puree and freeze them for when the K-Glet starts solids (which will be soon),

I tried that for my first child, but she hated it. On the other hand, she loved getting an al dente carrot stick that she could gum severely. [Big Grin]

Advice changes regularly in baby and child care. I think that the two biggest things are salt content and bacterial content. In practise this means that salt shouldn't be added to foods for babies and young children, eggs need to be cooked well, and soft or blue cheeses need to be cooked.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
I have lost one of my favorite recipes, and I hope some of you are familiar with it.

It is a fruit pudding. In the bottom of a baking dish you put a batter which has a huge amount of baking powder. You put the fruit on top of that, and then pour boiling liquid over it and bake it. The batter rises and engulfs the fruit.

I was thinking of making it with a mixture of nectarines and blueberries.

Moo

I'm not certain but check recipes using the word "cobbler". There are also a bunch of regional names for essentially the same thing -- I think of "blueberry grunt" for example.

John

Posts: 5929 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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You could always put leftover vege's in soup...!! In fact I pureed and froze loads of veg for my children and then had quite a lot left over which ended up going in to soup any way! Just label them - carrot and mango look rather alike when frozen!! All the veg are suitable, no problems with that. You could also blanch and freeze, and then either cook up and blend for baby or just add to other dishes - more flexible.

the batter dish sounds a bit like a clafuti? (I can't spell that!) which is a Yorkshire pudding mix with fruit....

My success of the week is 2 peppered smoked mackerel, defrosted in some milk in the microwave, blitzed with some of the milk and some garlic and herb cream cheese, served as a dip for lunch ( 2 year old loved dipping bread in to it!) and then when it was chilled it solidified in to a pate which I served on bread the next day. Fab! Oh I added some parsley as well....

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Posts: 376 | From: Swindon, UK | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I think 'cobbler' refers to topping a filling with scones, and can be sweet or savoury.

Clafloutis - as in this recipe - is more akin to a Yorkshire pudding, but with fruit.

Moo's recipe sounds like a variant on that, but with the addition of baking powder to promote super-rising - instead of depending on aeration and high temperature, as one would normally.

What about trying the traditional recipe? It might not be the same result, but it could be equally nice.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Nats
Shipmate
# 2211

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So that's how you spell it! Except that I wouldn't do individual ones, I'd do one big one...

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life is purple

Posts: 376 | From: Swindon, UK | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged



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