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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course
Flausa

Mad Woman
# 3466

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Does anyone have any ideas for cooking quinoa that aren't vegetarian meals? Everything I've seen so far online has quinoa used in vegetarian meals. I like quinoa, but I'm a meat-a-tarian, so I'd like to use it to cook a meal with meat. Barring that, I guess I just save it for when Jack the Lass comes for dinner!
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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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Never head of it nor had it, so I went searching.

It sounds really versatile; don't see why it could not be used with a shrimp stirfry or something

Here's the link!

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Even more so than I was before

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
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The packet of quinoa in my cupboard suggests a red quinoa & fruit salad and says it can be served as a meal accompaniment or on its own as a snack:

110g red quinoa
300ml water
25g raisins or currants
25g pine nuts
25g pineapple, fresh or canned
1 tbsp chopped mint leaves
1 spring onion - finely chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
pinch salt and pepper

Rinse Quinoa well before cooking. Add quinoa to 300ml of boiling water, return to the boil and then reduce heat and simmer for approximately 10 minutes until germ separates. Remove from heat, cover and leave to absorb remaining water. Once water has been absorbed leave to cool

Combine remaining ingredients and mix well. Add Quinoa once cooled and mix gently. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

I haven't tried this so can't tell you what it tastes like.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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Woooooooo! Catrine tried my recipe and liked it! [Cool] Thank you, C!

[ 26. August 2006, 17:10: Message edited by: KenWritez ]

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Does anyone have any ideas for cooking quinoa that aren't vegetarian meals?

I think I tried it once, but it didn't seem to catch on in our house. If it's one of these grains that are hydrated, what about using meat or chicken stock as the liquid? Then dicing the appropriate meat into the result?

Does it have to be served cold? That's maybe why I didn't take to it. I used cous-cous frequently, particularly with grilled lamb.

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Flausa

Mad Woman
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Firenze, I've not had quinoa cold. I've only had it in heated veggie meals (that were quite tasty). Well, okay, I've not had the grain itself cold, though I have had cereal that had flakes made with quinoa.

I rather like the texture of cooked quinoa - sort of pops between your teeth like fish roe does.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Here is a recipe for a soup with quinoia
quote:


Curried Quinoa-Tomato Soup

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 yellow onion, finely chopped
1 celery rib, finely chopped
2 cups fresh or canned chopped tomatoes
1 ½ quarts chicken stock
½ cup quinoa seeds, rinsed if necessary*
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 ½ teaspoons curry powder
¼ cup cold water
salt and pepper to taste

Cook garlic, celery, and onion in oil until tender. Stir in tomatoes, stock, and quinoa seeds. Simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Combine cornstarch and curry powder. Mix with cold water. Stir mixture into soup and bring to boil, stirring constantly until thickened, about two minutes.

*Put a spoonful of quinoa seed into a glass of water. Stir. If water becomes sudsy, rinse quinoa seeds thoroughly in several changes of water.

It's very good.

Moo

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sewanee_angel
Shipmate
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Today, I realized that I am sick* of all the dishes I usually cook for my dinner. I'm going to search the thread for new ideas. I just started grad school so I have little time and less money. I hope to find ideas for cheap and easy** ways to make food taste interesting again.


*not literally!
**I can cook well enough to stay alive and relatively healthy but my skills & knowledge are limited.

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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SA, you can't go wrong with some basic cookbooks. One I'd recommend is The Joy of Cooking. You can usually find this in used bookstores for cheap and it's got a ton of recipes, advice, conversion tables, et al.

You can find a bajillion recipes on foodtv.com and epicurious.com. Just a matter of looking for what you like. (Foodtv also has video demos on food prep basics and menu planning suggestions.)

If you live in the US, have cable, and get the Food Network, check out Alton Brown's show, "Good Eats." Rachel Ray's show "30 Minute Meals" is also pretty good for fast, basic cooking if you can stand her OTT perkiness.

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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sewanee_angel
Shipmate
# 2908

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Thanks KenWritez. I've seen both of the shows you mention. I can only take Rachael Ray in small doses but I have made a couple of her recipes before and they've been ok. Alton Brown entertains me but I've never been moved to try one of his recipes.

I've got a basic set of recipes that I cook and right now it just makes me go "blah." Tonight, I threw garlic, a touch of olive oil, white beans, tomatoes, spinach, red pepper flakes, thyme & marjoram into a pan and, once cooked, served over rice. It wasn't bad but I guess I'm just hoping for a couple of different spice/sauce ideas.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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sewanee_angel, I think that the thread a few pages back here in Heaven [sorry, I don't know how to make a link to an old thread] called Cheap and Nourishing - Student Cookery might yield a few ideas.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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SA, what sorts of things are you cooking now and what would you rather be cooking? Are you vegan/vegetarian?

--------------------
"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
sewanee_angel, I think that the thread a few pages back here in Heaven [sorry, I don't know how to make a link to an old thread] called Cheap and Nourishing - Student Cookery might yield a few ideas.

Here it is.

Moo

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Thanks Moo

[Overused]

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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I tried this recipe recently, and found it excellent

Greek Pizza with Spinach, Feta & Olives

½ Cup mayonnaise
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 Cup crumbled feta cheese, divided
1 12-in pre-baked Italian pizza crust
½ Cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, coarsely chopped, plus 1 Tb. of the oil
¼ Cup pitted Kalamata olives, chopped
1 tsp dried basil
2 Cups baby spinach leaves
½ small red onion, halved and thinly sliced

Adjust oven rack to lowest position, and heat oven to 450 degrees. Mix mayonnaise, garlic and ½ cup feta in a small bowl. Place pizza crust on a cookie sheet; spread mayonnaise mixture over pizza, then top with tomatoes, olives, and basil. Bake until heated through and crisp, about 10 minutes.

Toss spinach and onion with the 1 Tb. sun-dried tomato oil. Top hot pizza with spinach mixture and remaining ½ cup feta cheese. Return to oven and bake until cheese melts, about 4 minutes longer. Cut into 6 slices and serve.

--------------------
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Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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I had a really wonderful quinoa dsh recently, involved quinoa, spinach, and a light white cheese, perhaps provolone, and bell peppers. was lvoely.

I use it mostly in chicken and leek soup. it has a lot of calories, so I like to use it sparingly, but it's a nutritional superhero.

I've also made a "rice" pudding with quinoa and is was DIVINE. but again, the calorie count was EVIL.

anyone have a recipe for zuccini cake? I can't find mine.

Comet

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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Flausa

Mad Woman
# 3466

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cc, do you have you recipe for "rice" pudding? That's something I'd like to try.
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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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Quinoa Pudding

2 cups quinoa, cooked (cook quinoa: 1 part quinoa to 2 parts water)
3 cups milk
1/3 c honey or 1/3 c brown sugar (I used the honey)
1/2 cup ground almonds or walnuts
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp lemon or orange rind, grated
1 tsp lemon juice
1/2 raisins
1/2 c shredded coconut
1 tsp vanilla
3 beaten eggs
1/8 tsp salt
1 Tbs butter

combine them all and mix. pour into a greased baking dish or greased custard cups. bake in a 350F oven until set - about 45 minutes. serve hot or cold, topped with yogurt, cream, or apple sauce.

with this recipe, I have found a number of others, including
"Chickquinoa Salad"

2 cups cubed cooked chicken
1 cup cooked quinoa
1 cup diced celery
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup (!!!) mayonnaise
salt and paprika to taste

combine and chill.

there's also a wierd lasagna-esque one with burger, if you want to try that.

Comet

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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Flausa

Mad Woman
# 3466

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Thanks Comet! Hit me with the weird "lasagna-esque" one as well. I'm willing to try weird as long as it takes good.
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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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for the record, these are from a hand-written and photocopied handout from our Earth Day Festival a few years ago. Quinoa is earth-friendly, I guess. I don't know the details.

Quinoa Lasagne
1 can peeled stewed tomatoes, or 4 roma tomatoes, chopped
1 lb hamburger or veggie burger
2 8-oz cans tomato sauce
3 cups cooked quinoa
1/4 lb motzarella cheese, grated/crumbled
1/4 lb parmesan cheese, grated
1/4 c olive oil (!!!)
1 tsp salt
2 tsp oregano
1 c minced onion
1/2 lb ricotta
2 cloved garlic, minced

saute onion and garlic together in oilve oil, add burger, cook until browned. Add tomato sauce, tomatoes, salt and oregano simmer.

turn on yer oven. (350F)

put a layer of sauce in the botton of a 13x9 cake pan. followed with a layer of quinoa and layers of the cheeses. repeat for two more layers, ending with sauce and extra parmesan on top. bake 35 minutes.

let me know how it turns out!

C

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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All you'd ever want to know about quinoa.

When I was testing a gluten-free diet years ago, I used quinoa as a wheat alternative. I liked it, although it was (back then) tough to find except at health-food stores. It soaks up flavors like potatoes do, so I had to use larger amounts of seasonings, but YMMV.

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Flausa

Mad Woman
# 3466

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quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
Quinoa Lasagne
let me know how it turns out!

Well, it wasn't half bad (in spite of the fact that I stupidly picked up low-fat cheese - bleurgh). I think next time I'd add a green veg in ... maybe mix spinach into the cheese layer or add courgettes (zuchinni) to the sauce. It just needed that little something extra.
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Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
I'm willing to try weird as long as it takes good.

Me too [Big Grin]

Jack the Lab-rat

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
wiblog blipfoto blog

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Flausa

Mad Woman
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Hmmm ... that should have been "tastes good" ... obviously JtL we are now sharing the same brainwaves - eep! I'll be trying my hand at homemade humous next, and hopefully I'll have the perfect recipe when next you come over for dinner.
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sewanee_angel
Shipmate
# 2908

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Moo, thanks for the link to "cheap and nourishing."

I've just started grad school and cheap is good. Nourishing, tasty, and cheap is even better. I've just run out of ideas and since I don't really know how to use spices to their best advantage and/or combinations, I don't always do well "making something up." I'm not a vegetarian but I often eat meat-less meals.

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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Speaking of using spices, do people here have certain herbs and spices that add that zing to dishes of certain incredients? I have a friend who swears by putting dill leaf on eggs. I haven't tried it yet. I like oregano on broiled fish. Any favorites out there?

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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dill on salmon. rosemary on chicken or potatoes. Chili in vegetrian dishes. garlic on anything that will hold still long enough.

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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KenWritez
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# 3238

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Seasoning staples in my kitchen:

Garlic (minced, powder and fresh)
Kosher salt
Fresh peppercorns (for grinding)
Old Bay Seasoning (great on eggs, potatoes!)
Dried: cumin, oregano, basil (fresh when I can get it), thyme, dill
Chicken boullion (sprinkle this on cooked veg, eggs, soups, darn near anything.)
Balsamic vinegar

If I had to use a spice cabinet I could fit in my pockets, this would be it.

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Catrine
Shipmate
# 9811

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quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
dill on salmon. rosemary on chicken or potatoes. Chili in vegetrian dishes. garlic on anything that will hold still long enough.

My kitchen reinforces this philosophy.

[ 02. September 2006, 09:22: Message edited by: Catrine ]

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Seasoning staples in my kitchen:

Garlic (minced, powder and fresh)
Kosher salt
Fresh peppercorns (for grinding)
Old Bay Seasoning (great on eggs, potatoes!)
Dried: cumin, oregano, basil (fresh when I can get it), thyme, dill
Chicken boullion (sprinkle this on cooked veg, eggs, soups, darn near anything.)
Balsamic vinegar

If I had to use a spice cabinet I could fit in my pockets, this would be it.

Old Bay!

It's been years since I've had that blend. I'll have to get me a can.

And I just got a jar of chicken granules for a certain chipotle enchilada recipe (I usually use boullion cubes for things) so I'll give it a shot on "darn near anything". [Smile]

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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My all-purpose, use-on-everything seasoning is Cajun's Choice Blackened Seasoning by Louisiana Foods. Comes in a spice-size glass bottle (net weight 77 grams). Brightens lots of foods. Wonderful on fried catfish, eggs, hamburgers, you name it. I am not being paid a promotional fee here; I really just like it.

ETA: Definitely rosemary on potatoes! Wonderful combination!

[ 02. September 2006, 16:34: Message edited by: Mousethief ]

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KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by sewanee_angel:
I've just started grad school and cheap is good. Nourishing, tasty, and cheap is even better.

When I was in college, I lived on generic mac and cheese from a box, the lowest grade of ground beef with added vegetable protein, white bread and chicken bologna sandwiches, so I've been there and I empathize.

Carbs and starches eill be less expensive than animal protein, which will usually be most expensive.

The key is to maximize your money when shopping. This requires some effort on your part. In my town, the grocery stores send out ad circulars every Wednesday, highlighting their sale items and specials. If you live in the US, likely your local stores do it as well.

Do what I do and scan the ads, looking for the best prices. I even keep track of my staples in an Excel worksheet so I know what I paid for say, a 5# bag of navel oranges or a whole chicken or a 15 oz. can of kidney beans.

Also, take your receipt from your previous grocery shopping trip to another store and see how prices for the same items compare. Oddly enough, a local Target sells canned food at about 1/2 to 3/4 of what my local grocery store charges for the same items, so Target is where I buy my canned fruit, soups and veg.

You can stretch a whole cooked chicken an amazing number of meals, and whole birds are always less expensive per pound than their parts, like breasts. (Chicken thighs and drumsticks are always less expensive than breasts.) You can stretch larger, inexpensive cuts of beef, like London broil, to cover multiple dishes as well.

A general rule is, the more a food is processed, the more expensive it will be.

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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More on spices:

Tarragon goes well with green beans. When I steam fresh green beans, I sprinkle a bunch of tarragon in the water, and it gives a nice subtle flavor to the beans.

I also have several blends from this wonderful place: a Sage and Savory blend that I put on chicken breasts and cornish hens; a "Little Italy" blend of oregano, marjoram, thyme and rosemary that I use in a lot of recipes that call for oregano; and a few different pepper blends. Walking into this store is like going into an ancient bazaar -- the aromas are heavenly!

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez
A general rule is, the more a food is processed, the more expensive it will be.

Also, the more likely it is to contain excessive salt or sugar, not to mention transfats.

Make your own is healthier as well as cheaper.

Moo

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See you later, alligator.

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs? Every year at this time we have a glut of them from our very productive tree in the garden. I've attempted to dry them, unsuccesfully, in the past, and am getting a little tired of sliced figs on top of my breakfast cereal each morning. Someone told me you could make fig jam but I've never seen a recipe. What else can I do with them?

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
garlic on anything that will hold still long enough.

Absolutely! I've even heard of, though never tried, garlic ice cream!

For spices I really recommend you grind your own pepper, it is so much tastier than the ready ground and mills are available quite cheaply almost anywhere, certainly in UK, and it will be worth it. Black pepper is also a lot tangier than white.

Chilli powder, Coriander powder and Turmeric are all worth having a little of, too - a little spice goes a long way and turns an ordinary dish into something special.

We're lucky here as most of the spices are grown locally - the black pepper from my ma-in-law's garden is amazing!

I'm told there can be problems getting fresh spices in North America so your best bet is to go to your local Asian grocery store and buy the plastic packets, the jars in the supermarket are a complete rip-off.

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Gracie
Shipmate
# 3870

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs? Every year at this time we have a glut of them from our very productive tree in the garden. I've attempted to dry them, unsuccesfully, in the past, and am getting a little tired of sliced figs on top of my breakfast cereal each morning. Someone told me you could make fig jam but I've never seen a recipe. What else can I do with them?

I made a very delicious fig and lemon jam, Gracious Rebel. Here's the recipe:

2lb dried figs
1 1/2 pints water
3 lb sugar
juice of 2 lemons

Soak figs in water for 12 hours.
Rinse in fresh water.
Cut into small pieces, removing bits of hard stem.
Put into pan with 1 1/2 pints hot water.
Simmer until tender.
Stir in sugar and lemon juice and continue to cook until thick.

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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Thanks Gracie, sounds yummy, but that's for dried figs. Any idea on how to adapt the recipe for fresh ones?

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Gracie
Shipmate
# 3870

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Oops, sorry you're right - I wasn't paying attention [Hot and Hormonal] .

Here is the recipe for fresh figs - which is the one I actually made!! It actually means the figs don't need soaking or pre-cooking before adding sugar if they are very ripe. You need the lemon though, because there isn't enough pectin or whatever in the figs.

1lb fresh ripe figs
1lb sugar
juice 1 lemon

Half or quarter the figs, depending on size.
Put into the pan with sugar and lemon juice.
Heat gently stirring all the time until sugar has dissolved.
Boil steadily until set.

Voilà - it's delicious!

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When someone is convinced he’s an Old Testament prophet there’s not a lot you can do with him rationally. - Sine

Posts: 1090 | From: En lieu sûr | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Anna B
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# 1439

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs?

GR, my copy of Larousse gastronomique says that figs can be used in any recipe calling for apricots. They would make an admirable tart, for example, or you could poach them in red wine, or make a figgy glaze for ham. I like them baked in phyllo and drizzled with a bit of honey.

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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I assume you have to peel the figs first before making them into jam or anything else? When I eat them raw I always peel them, but dried figs always look as if they have the skins still on, so maybe they are edible after all?

You can see that for someone with masses of figs I really don't have much clue about using them!?

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Gracie
Shipmate
# 3870

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Fig skins are edible according to this site I found all about figs. I didn't peel mine, but thought I'd better check just to make sure I didn't lead you into disaster. There's also a similar recipe for fig jam there.

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When someone is convinced he’s an Old Testament prophet there’s not a lot you can do with him rationally. - Sine

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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Thanks Gracie. I feel really educated now!

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Here is a very practical request. For next Sunday I need a dish that is
  1. savoury
  2. milk free
  3. either vegetarian or with fish in it
  4. suitable for cooking in advance
  5. can be eaten cold or warmed
  6. appealing to the sophisticated older palate (a mix between conservative and adventurous, not quite your standard quiche, sausage rolls, ham sandwiches, lettuce salad and crisps but neither into very exotic food)
  7. suitable for a birthday lunch
  8. easily portioned as a self service buffet

Any suggestions?

Jengie

[ 03. September 2006, 19:49: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]

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Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Thistle
Apprentice
# 5142

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We recently had a buffet lunch for around 50, and as a vegetarian dish, served a spinach and cheese pie, using puff pastry. You could use goats cheese or a sheeps milk cheese if your non-milk drinkers are only bothered by cows milk. If the butter in pastry is problematic, you can use non-dairy margarine if you make it by hand. Alternatively, salmon en croute? Recipe here Of course, the creamy pesto sauce wouldn't work with non-dairy types but could be adapted. Definitely good hot or cold, and easily portionable. And looks suitably festive if you dress it up.
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Amos

Shipmate
# 44

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs? Every year at this time we have a glut of them from our very productive tree in the garden. I've attempted to dry them, unsuccesfully, in the past, and am getting a little tired of sliced figs on top of my breakfast cereal each morning. Someone told me you could make fig jam but I've never seen a recipe. What else can I do with them?

Convey them to me, at once.

[ 03. September 2006, 22:02: Message edited by: Amos ]

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Posts: 7667 | From: Summerisle | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cod
Shipmate
# 2643

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Has anyone here tried larding meat?

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Posts: 4229 | From: New Zealand | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
KenWritez
Shipmate
# 3238

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Here is a very practical request. For next Sunday I need a dish that is [...]

I don't know how fancy you want to get, so here's some dishes more sophisticated than average:

Grilled salmon or white fish steaks with a topping of stoneground mustard, white wine and chopped dill. Serve with sushi rice.

Shrimp with herbs and dirty rice casserole

Twice-baked potatoes with soy cheese, rosemary and green onion

Seared ahi tuna crusted with sesame seeds and drizzled with a soy sauce, sherry and wasabi glaze served on a bed of marinated julienned carrot and celery, with chopped mushrooms and pickled red peppers

Casserole of fish balls, fried celery with parmesan cheese, jasmine rice made with fish stock and chopped green onion

Grilled portobello mushroom caps painted with olive oil and stuffed with a filling of chopped crab or fish, spinach, mayonnaise, diced celery, red pepper flakes, and sweet gherkins.

Gazpacho

Ceviche

Spinach raviolis stuffed with chopped crab or fish, soy cheese, and herbs

Is this type what you're looking for?

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"The truth is you're the weak. And I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be a shepherd." --Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction

My blog: http://oxygenofgrace.blogspot.com

Posts: 11102 | From: Left coast of Wonderland, by the rabbit hole | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Suzywoozy
Shipmate
# 6259

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Absolutely! I've even heard of, though never tried, garlic ice cream!


Here on the Isle of Wight we have a whole Garlic Festival , where you can indeed buy garlic icecream - so popular it sold out this year! Also garlic fudge and beer.

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Posts: 658 | From: Ambridge | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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Hmph. An idea stolen from NoCal, I believe. You can also get garlic ice cream at the Gilroy Garlic Festival.
Posts: 4358 | From: Bay Area, Calif | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged



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