homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools
Thread closed  Thread closed


Post new thread  
Thread closed  Thread closed
My profile login | | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   » Ship's Locker   » Limbo   » Eccles: Incense and thuribles (Page 9)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  14  15  16 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: Eccles: Incense and thuribles
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
An interesting choice, jlg. Our crowd reserves the tongs for holding a coal when it is lighted, preferring the holy oven mit to manipulate the base of the thurible when dumping. Good catch, though. Those things can get hot.
Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

 - Posted      Profile for jlg   Email jlg   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Our thurible has lost its wooden knob, so the tongs are needed both to lift the hot cover and also to pull out the little inner metal liner and help knock out the leftover coals.

An oven mitt would definitely be helpful, I will admit.

I'm sure it's already been mentioned, but it can't hurt to also point out the a propane blowtorch is a great item for lighting the coals. (It is also useful for melting waxdrips off of candlesticks when cleaning up and causing the candlestick socket to expand a bit - and be warm - so your tight-fitting candles will go in without five minutes of struggle.)

Posts: 17391 | From: Just a Town, New Hampshire, USA | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Max.
Shipmate
# 5846

 - Posted      Profile for Max.     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
When I empty the thurible I normally take it outside the church and I rest the base on the ground, open the lid and then tip it upside down with my foot - I then tip it back upright (very carefully so that it doesn't tangle the chains)
I then stamp on the charcoal until it's nothing more than black dust.

It's taken years and years of practice to perfect it but that is (I believe) the best way to dump hot charcoal from a thurible after mass. If anything is stuck at the bottom, scraping a knife around the edge of the thurible bowl after emptying and tipping it all upside down again doesn't hurt - but if you're a good thurifer you never would get anything stuck in the thurible anyway!

Max

[ 05. June 2006, 18:30: Message edited by: Max. ]

--------------------
For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

Posts: 9716 | From: North Yorkshire | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
moveable_type
Shipmate
# 9673

 - Posted      Profile for moveable_type   Email moveable_type   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Max.:
When I empty the thurible I normally take it outside the church and I rest the base on the ground, open the lid and then tip it upside down with my foot - I then tip it back upright (very carefully so that it doesn't tangle the chains)
I then stamp on the charcoal until it's nothing more than black dust.

What about an old paint can half filled with water?
Posts: 1062 | From: Toronto | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Max.
Shipmate
# 5846

 - Posted      Profile for Max.     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by sheela-na-gig:

What about an old paint can half filled with water?

No - a Brass Thurible full of charcoal and incense

Max

[ 05. June 2006, 20:29: Message edited by: Max. ]

--------------------
For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

Posts: 9716 | From: North Yorkshire | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by sheela-na-gig:
quote:
Originally posted by Max.:
When I empty the thurible I normally take it outside the church and I rest the base on the ground, open the lid and then tip it upside down with my foot - I then tip it back upright (very carefully so that it doesn't tangle the chains)
I then stamp on the charcoal until it's nothing more than black dust.

What about an old paint can half filled with water?
Hmmm. Reading for comprehension...Yes, sheela-na-gig, that works quite nicely. Our sacristy has a big five inch deep enameled turkey pan that serves the same function. It doesn't need a lot of water, just enough to be able to drown the coals. I prefer more of a soupy stew consistency rather than a lumpy consomme.
Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sacristan
Shipmate
# 3548

 - Posted      Profile for Sacristan   Email Sacristan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I just hang the thing up on a hook in the sacristy and let it completely burn up. Then come back to it a few hours/days/weeks later and clean up. It's quite cool to the touch then. [Biased]

--------------------
More abomination, more abomination

Posts: 1008 | From: West of Gotham | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Sacristan, you know I respect you and your judgment, but I have one concern and one comment.

I'm disinclined to leave any fire untended, so the idea of leaving the coals in the thurible untended makes us uncomfortable. So, we don't even leave the thurible untended during the mass. Once cleaned, the top is left suspended above the vessel to show it's empty and has been cleaned.

For the incense we use, from our common special supplier, though we are burning the frankincense straight, the resin accretes in the bowl as a rock hard surface that is next to impossible to clean off, unless it is scraped out when it is soft and gooey.

Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sacristan
Shipmate
# 3548

 - Posted      Profile for Sacristan   Email Sacristan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Well, I should have said that we have an old high fireplace in our sacristy which has been fitted to hold the thuribles. Brick and stone aren't too flammable.

As to the residue, acetone does the job for us quite well (once the fire's out and the thurible cooled off!).

E.

--------------------
More abomination, more abomination

Posts: 1008 | From: West of Gotham | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
That's a nice setup, whereas ours are racked over a tile floor, but adjacent to a 'formica'-laminated plywood cupboard. And since we, therefore, must scrape after each use, doing so while hot makes the job easier and safer.

Thanks for the explanation.

Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sacristan
Shipmate
# 3548

 - Posted      Profile for Sacristan   Email Sacristan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Sorry to double post - I didn't read carefuly enough. You were mentioning the BOWL! Those we line with aluminum foil. Just change it after each/a few uses.

--------------------
More abomination, more abomination

Posts: 1008 | From: West of Gotham | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Hmm. I've heard of and occasionally seen aluminum foil remaining in thuribles in other sacristies. Both our thuribles have copper bowls that clean up well, so we've thought to use aluminum foil.

[I'll wave off now, cuz we shouldn't make this thread into the Sacristan and TSA Show.]

[ 06. June 2006, 04:31: Message edited by: The Silent Acolyte ]

Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Angloid
Shipmate
# 159

 - Posted      Profile for Angloid     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Sacristan:
Sorry to double post - I didn't read carefuly enough. You were mentioning the BOWL! Those we line with aluminum foil. Just change it after each/a few uses.

And if you're lucky you can get hold of a supply of those little aluminium cases they put mince pies etc. in. Ready made liners.

--------------------
Brian: You're all individuals!
Crowd: We're all individuals!
Lone voice: I'm not!

Posts: 12927 | From: The Pool of Life | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sacristan
Shipmate
# 3548

 - Posted      Profile for Sacristan   Email Sacristan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
We actually wrap the entire copper inner bowl in foil, inside and outside. Then shove the whole thing back in.It is a very tight fit, but keeps the gook out for the most part.

--------------------
More abomination, more abomination

Posts: 1008 | From: West of Gotham | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Comper's Child
Shipmate
# 10580

 - Posted      Profile for Comper's Child     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Blessed Percy says something about "sweet oil" - I guess olive oil - as a preventative to too much gunk building up...
Posts: 2509 | From: Penn's Greene Countrie Towne | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ultraspike

Incensemeister
# 268

 - Posted      Profile for Ultraspike   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Yes, sweet oil is olive oil basically, which I've tried but it takes alot more elbow grease to get the residue off than acetone.

We turn the inner bowl upside down and burn off the residue over the flame.

--------------------
A cowgirl's work is never done.

Posts: 2732 | From: NYC | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Comper's Child
Shipmate
# 10580

 - Posted      Profile for Comper's Child     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
But acetone is very dangerous especially regarding fumes. Try mineral spirits - a bit safer, less flamable and the fumes are less intense.

Still, all in all it's a messy business to make a fragrant offering.

Posts: 2509 | From: Penn's Greene Countrie Towne | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
moveable_type
Shipmate
# 9673

 - Posted      Profile for moveable_type   Email moveable_type   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by EpiscoWhat:
Well I very much am jealous at the those who are lucky enough to have the smoke at their Prayer Shack. My Prayer Shack is so opposed to smoke that when we built a new church and moved someone hid our thurible and even though Father has searched high and low for it (he wants to introduce smoke), it just cannot be found.

I've threatened to make a donation to the church in order to get some smoke going!

EW

There are always thuribles available on Ebay, from points as far afield as Uruguay and Shanghai.

Chinese thuribles seem to be stationary, rather like teapots – I don’t see how they get enough air. Western thuribles must be smokier. Maybe a Chinese thurible would be a compromise for churches divided over incense? Though it's hard to see how you could use it to cense something.

(One of the Chinese ones is marketed as a ‘propitious thurible,’ which possibly deserves to be the name of something – a blog, or perhaps a sailboat.)

Posts: 1062 | From: Toronto | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
voxmystica
Apprentice
# 11487

 - Posted      Profile for voxmystica   Email voxmystica   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Thanks for all the responses about Rosa mystica. I think I may get the kind from Alton Abbey. The original formula stored in glass jars may have lost its scent.

Does anyone know about the adoration brand. It kind of looks like little pieces of wood...probably flowers, and it burns as soon as you put it on the coal. Is this a filler? I got a sample of the Vita mundi and the Roma. Both smell similar.

Posts: 20 | From: Midlothian, VA | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
sheela-na-gig, thanks for the idea of cruising through ebay periodically.

As far as stationary thuribles are concerned, the Chinese settings are not nearly so weather-tight as our Western churches. I suspect there is enough ambient airflow to keep things smoking. Imagine a banked fire and gentle smoke.

Regarding propitious: it merely means "seeking for", so read "supplicatory."

Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
What was this thread doing half-way down on page 6?

Over here on the girdles thread, the question of dressing left or dressing right came up.

It was alleged that were thurifer to dress right, the dangly bit of the cincture would interfere with the thurible being carried in the right hand.

Now at my nut job parish (just this morning my priest called me "odd", he really did!) waaaay back in time, as a tender young shoot of a thurifer, I was taught to carry the thurible before it was blessed in my left hand and a pot after it was blessed in my right.

Is this just an oddment of my local parish or are other parishes similarly odd?

Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Thurible
Shipmate
# 3206

 - Posted      Profile for Thurible   Email Thurible   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
That was the case in my parish too, TSA (as it was where we were told to get knotted on the left).

Of course, one wouldn't swing the thurible in one's left hand, so the girdle getting in the way wasn't an issue.

Thurible

--------------------
"I've been baptised not lobotomised."

Posts: 8049 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
voxmystica
Apprentice
# 11487

 - Posted      Profile for voxmystica   Email voxmystica   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Oh, how I love this tread the best! I did just get back from St. Paul K-Street in D.C. for Solemn Evensong and Benediction. It is always wonderful there! I think they were burning Elmore Abbey "Evesham", which I think is quite nice and not so sweet. Either that or Glastonbury.

Bring out your Rose, almost Assumption-Dormition-Feast of BVM!! [Votive]

Posts: 20 | From: Midlothian, VA | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Ultraspike

Incensemeister
# 268

 - Posted      Profile for Ultraspike   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Yes, got my Marian blend ready with extra Rose Maroc. We're entertaining La Rez this year and I'll be high in the Rockies though.

btw, has anyone heard of censing the front door? A certain church included that in their Transfiguration procession yesterday (no it was not Little Church though).

--------------------
A cowgirl's work is never done.

Posts: 2732 | From: NYC | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fishngrl
Shipmate
# 11094

 - Posted      Profile for Fishngrl   Email Fishngrl   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by voxmystica:
Thanks for the responses. St. Bertolin, I knew I would get in trouble for that statement about the self-lighting charcoal! I am well aware that the stuff is evil. I don't know where you can get the real stuff in the US. I did read that SMV NYC has their own gas burners to heat the real charcoal.

...

There is not an Episcopal (Anglo-Catholic brand) that has a Solemn Mass around here. My best bet is to venture to D.C. to St. Paul's K Street for the feasts days. Which is about 2 hrs. And I usually play the organ on Sundays in Richomd. So, my experience with solid liturgy and incense is rare.


Posts: 155 | From: New York, NY | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Creature of Salt
Shipmate
# 11610

 - Posted      Profile for Creature of Salt     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by The Silent Acolyte:
Now at my nut job parish (just this morning my priest called me "odd", he really did!) waaaay back in time, as a tender young shoot of a thurifer, I was taught to carry the thurible before it was blessed in my left hand and a pot after it was blessed in my right.

Is this just an oddment of my local parish or are other parishes similarly odd?

I believe you'll find that practice enshrined in the customary of Advent, Boston. I do it that way too, when I remember.
Posts: 156 | From: USA | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Sacristan
Shipmate
# 3548

 - Posted      Profile for Sacristan   Email Sacristan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Of course, that is most certainly the way God intends it. Left hand for an unblessed,"empty" thurible. Then, if there is no assistant with the boat, one's right hand is the one holding the boat. One always presents with the right hand. So...then we are ready to hand the boat over with the right hand. Then with the empty right hand one can pull on the fourth chain, grasp with the left and raise the thurible with the right to the correct height for laying the incense.

--------------------
More abomination, more abomination

Posts: 1008 | From: West of Gotham | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Bringing the mouth of the open thurible to the height of the boat and resting the side of the thurible gently against the side of the boat so the celebrant has less opportunity to let incense grains fall to the ground as they are spooned from boat to thurible.

So. How many spoonfuls at each charging?

Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sacristan
Shipmate
# 3548

 - Posted      Profile for Sacristan   Email Sacristan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Three

--------------------
More abomination, more abomination

Posts: 1008 | From: West of Gotham | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Corpus cani

Ship's Anachronism
# 1663

 - Posted      Profile for Corpus cani     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Four - three for the Trinity and "one for our Lady, Father?"

Corpus

[ETA: Actually, this is usually just before a procession - three is the norm for yer acherl work-a-day censing.]

[ 09. August 2006, 10:28: Message edited by: Corpus cani ]

--------------------
Bishop Lord Corpus Cani the Tremulous of Buzzing St Helens.

Posts: 4435 | From: Trumpton | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
*Leon*
Shipmate
# 3377

 - Posted      Profile for *Leon*   Email *Leon*   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I'm not sure that spoons are of standard size.

Nor is the ammount of smoke needed standardised; it depends on the size of the sanctuary.

(At my parent's church, the spoon that goes with the boat that matches the big festive thurible is absurdly small)

Posts: 831 | From: london | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Thurible
Shipmate
# 3206

 - Posted      Profile for Thurible   Email Thurible   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
In the copy of the Walsingham Review (Assumptiontide 2006) that has just dropped onto my doormat, there is a photo of a thurifer (accompanied by two boatboys). He is holding the 'top' of the thurible (the disc, I suppose?) in his right hand, and swinging it, open, in his left.

Strikes me as rather an eccentric thing to do.

Thurible

--------------------
"I've been baptised not lobotomised."

Posts: 8049 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
We only do this in the sacristy if the thurifer has misjudged the length of the sermon and needs quickly to get the coals all glowing and gray.

Orthodox thuribles tend not to be fully closed, ever.

Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Thurible
Shipmate
# 3206

 - Posted      Profile for Thurible   Email Thurible   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Well, yes, quite. Indeed, I had to do it hiding behind a pillar last week when one of the charcoals had, inexplicably, gone out. But this chap certainly appeared to be processing.

I don't suppose he's a shipmate willing to comment?

Thurible

--------------------
"I've been baptised not lobotomised."

Posts: 8049 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Maniple
Shipmate
# 2237

 - Posted      Profile for Maniple   Author's homepage   Email Maniple   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
WD-40 is good for removing much of the tary gunk.

In fact WD-40 is good for anything.

Note to all Sacristans:

Make sure the chains are clean after the thurible has been polished.

The lavabo gets lots of muck off ones hands but polish residue is a little tricky. Much better to make sure the thurible is cleaned propely before Mass.

--------------------
No Maniple, No Mass.
Better Together.

Posts: 178 | From: La Casa del Caffe Tazza d'Oro | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Maniple
Shipmate
# 2237

 - Posted      Profile for Maniple   Author's homepage   Email Maniple   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
PS

Does anyone know what the blend used at Walsingham is. I keep meaning to enquire whenever I'm there but always forget.

It produces a decent amount of smoke and smells nice too.

--------------------
No Maniple, No Mass.
Better Together.

Posts: 178 | From: La Casa del Caffe Tazza d'Oro | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
voxmystica
Apprentice
# 11487

 - Posted      Profile for voxmystica   Email voxmystica   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Walsingham, according to their store website, uses on Glastonbury from Elmore Abbey on Sundays and Rosa Mystica for high feasts. http://shop.walsinghamanglican.org.uk/acatalog/e_Shop_Priests__Supplies_6.html
Posts: 20 | From: Midlothian, VA | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Myron
Apprentice
# 11737

 - Posted      Profile for Myron   Email Myron   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
We only use one incense at my church - pure high quality frankincense grown in the Dhofar region of Oman which I was able to acquire several years ago from a vendor in Oman at a reasonable price. There is no offensive additives or perfumes. It is frankincense grown in the same region prized for its superiority for many centuries, even in ancient biblical times. It is described by one of the current vendors as follows:

"Oman Frankincense resin - Boswellia sacra - Superior Hojary grade frankincense from the Dhofar region of Oman. Considered by many to be the finest frankincense resin in the world, Hojary is primarily the larger selected white and lemon-white colored frankincense resins. It comes only from Dhofar region of Oman, whose arid growing conditions are ideal for fine quality frankincense resin.
Superior Hojary frankincense resins produce beautiful light, bright, citrus aromas with slight underlying woody and balsamic tones. Of the frankincense resins from Oman, Hojary is the most sought after of all."

My shipment arrived from Oman in the form of "tears" as picked directly from the trees in Oman, so they had to be crushed in order to use in a thurible. By trial and error, I have developed an efficient (however noisy) method of crushing the tears only when needed so that the resins remain fresh as long as possible.
Unfortunately, over time the prices have escalated for this superior quality frankincense (only the Sultan of Oman is provided with the very best), but can be purchased at several websites. Just google "Dhofar frankincense" to find them. Notice that there are lower quality grades available at cheaper prices, but I didn't buy those so I don't know the difference. I do know that the frankincense sold in most church supply stores is an inferior grade, usually from Somalia, and probably stale from age. We are very pleased with our pure Omani frankincense.

To maximize the emission of the natural and fresh aroma and to avoid as much harshness as possible in the burning of incense, I have developed a method which i think works well: I line the fire pot of the thurible with new foil before each use to avoid the presense of any previously scorched residue. A clean thurible is essential. Rather than placing the lit coals on the bottom of the fire pot, I stand them on their sides leaning against the sides of the fire pot. Before the incense is added, I make sure the coals are red hot by using a battery- operated hand-held fan. The incense is added to the center where the heat from the surrounding coals will activate the resins and begin smoking. This method delays the eventual scorching of the incense. To get more smoke faster and longer the hot coals can be pushed over the incense, although this will hasten the scorch. In my mind, the practise of sprinking incense on top of the coals causes an immediate scorch and tends to extinguish the hot coals. The idea is to keep the the coals hot and the incense fresh and aromatic.

Posts: 1 | From: San Francisco | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
edbakker
Apprentice
# 11719

 - Posted      Profile for edbakker   Email edbakker   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Myron:
We only use one incense at my church - pure high quality frankincense grown in the Dhofar region of Oman which I was able to acquire several years ago from a vendor in Oman at a reasonable price. There is no offensive additives or perfumes.

Very interesting post, thank you. I have served as a thurifer for many years, but have never come across this brand of incense. Moreless used the same brand ( pricknash ) at Christ Church,Brunswick ( Melbourne ) for many years. Back in NZ, 2 years ago, I used some insence, which came from a Greek Orthodox Monastry in Greece, which was very pleasant, cannot recall the name unfortunately.


Ed....

--------------------
Restless... until we rest in Thee Saint Augustine

Posts: 5 | From: Oxford New Zealand | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
The Scrumpmeister
Ship’s Taverner
# 5638

 - Posted      Profile for The Scrumpmeister   Author's homepage   Email The Scrumpmeister   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by edbakker:
quote:
Originally posted by Myron:
We only use one incense at my church - pure high quality frankincense grown in the Dhofar region of Oman which I was able to acquire several years ago from a vendor in Oman at a reasonable price. There is no offensive additives or perfumes.

Very interesting post, thank you. I have served as a thurifer for many years, but have never come across this brand of incense. Moreless used the same brand ( pricknash ) at Christ Church,Brunswick ( Melbourne ) for many years. Back in NZ, 2 years ago, I used some insence, which came from a Greek Orthodox Monastry in Greece, which was very pleasant, cannot recall the name unfortunately.


Ed....

Ed, where've you been?!

I remember you from aaaaaages ago. Have you re-registered? I did a quick search on your old posts and your one surviving post on the Ship is a reply to me. [Big Grin] I'm rather honoured.

Glad to see you back around.

--------------------
If Christ is not fully human, humankind is not fully saved. - St John of Saint-Denis

Posts: 14741 | From: Greater Manchester, UK | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fishngrl
Shipmate
# 11094

 - Posted      Profile for Fishngrl   Email Fishngrl   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Ultraspike, I saw your post about the Kingsford charcoal and thought that I should report that my prayer shack uses that charcoal also. We polished the brass this past Saturday and I helped carry it to the smoke room. One of my Brothers in Christ schlepped it in from some big box store out there in Jersey...and it made me think of our conversation at the last Shipmeet.

It's better for the church that I stay away from fiery things, so I don't know any details about mixtures, lighting, etc. other than what you've told me. It sure would've been nice to use your acetone trick to clean those enormous thuribles!

Sacristan was saying that his folks line the thurible with foil, and I wanted to add that on the three times per year that incense was (argued about and grudgingly) used at my former parish, we put the charcoal (those little discs) into an empty cat food container, which then went inside the thurible. It seemed to fit our little Southern Protestant holy hardware, replacements are always available - but it did not produce adequate clouds of smoke like we've got up here!

Hope y'all have a wonderful Feast of the Assumption!

Posts: 155 | From: New York, NY | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Mama Thomas
Shipmate
# 10170

 - Posted      Profile for Mama Thomas   Email Mama Thomas   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
All the special blends sound so heavenly. Here we use the dried sap of the...Wait I don't know what it is called in English, the ngali nut in Solomons and nangai nut in Vanuatu. Same fruit though. Nice smell but not very much smoke. It is burned on coconut charcoal for the most part. That's why we always have to have a boat boy/girl, to help keep the fire going.

--------------------
All hearts are open, all desires known

Posts: 3742 | From: Somewhere far away | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ed Bakker
Shipmate
# 2706

 - Posted      Profile for Ed Bakker   Email Ed Bakker   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by Saint Bertolin:


Ed.... , where've you been?!

I remember you from aaaaaages ago. Have you re-registered? I did a quick search on your old posts and your one surviving post on the Ship is a reply to me. [Big Grin] I'm rather honoured.

Glad to see you back around.

[Smile] It is good to be remembered. Thank you so much.I have had a number of changes in my life, i.e. family circumstances caused us to move from Melbourne to New Zealand, we have been back four years now. Churchmanship compared to OZ became a big problem and left the Anglican Church for the Anglican Catholic Church (TAC). Still in touch with my Finnish Orthodox Friends, which keep me in supply of Orthodox music and video's. Started recently re-joining the ship. Drop us a pvt msg if you have the time.
In XC
Ed....

--------------------
Restless... until we rest in Thee Saint Augustine

Posts: 57 | From: Oxford New Zealand | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Jim Olson
Apprentice
# 11857

 - Posted      Profile for Jim Olson   Author's homepage   Email Jim Olson   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Hello everyone, I've just found this message board while doing a search for thuribles online. Fascinating...I've spent over an hour reading back through the posts.

I teach worship and liturgy at Boston University School of Theology. As you can imagine, most Methodists can't figure out the reason for a good thurible, hence my online search for an inexpensive one. Of course, I know you get what you pay for, so here's the rub...

Would any of you have a thurible that is no longer used that you would be willing to donate to Boston University? It does not have to be in great condition, simply usable. I would prefer a four-chain, (I have access to a single chain one that the Catholics who use our chapel keep...). You would receive in return three things. 1) My personal gratitude. 2) The knowledge that 40 students in the Arts of Worship class each term will at least have had some experience of a thurible and 3) a nice donation letter on Chapel letterhead thanking you for your donation, suitable for tax purposes.

What say you? You can reach me directly at revjj@bu.edu.

Thanks everyone. I will keep reading with great interest.

Posts: 1 | From: Boston, Massachusetts | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

 - Posted      Profile for RuthW     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
I just attended mass at the cathedral in Santiago, and I saw something there I hadn't seen before (actually, I saw a lot of things I hadn't seen before, but one is relevant to this thread). During the eucharistic prayer, the thurifer knelt on the steps in front of the altar, back to the congregation, and from that position censed the altar at the elevations of the bread and cup. Is this common, unique to Santiago, what?
Posts: 24453 | From: La La Land | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Nunc Dimittis
Seamstress of Sound
# 848

 - Posted      Profile for Nunc Dimittis   Email Nunc Dimittis   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
We used to do that in my old parish, OLDC in Sydney.

I believe they also do it at CCSL, and other reputable A-C shrines in Oz.

Posts: 9515 | From: Delta Quadrant | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
RCD
Shipmate
# 11440

 - Posted      Profile for RCD     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
I just attended mass at the cathedral in Santiago, and I saw something there I hadn't seen before (actually, I saw a lot of things I hadn't seen before, but one is relevant to this thread). During the eucharistic prayer, the thurifer knelt on the steps in front of the altar, back to the congregation, and from that position censed the altar at the elevations of the bread and cup. Is this common, unique to Santiago, what?

How else would he do it? Is it more common for thurifers to incense from the side?

[ 24. September 2006, 12:08: Message edited by: RCD ]

Posts: 434 | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged
The Silent Acolyte

Shipmate
# 1158

 - Posted      Profile for The Silent Acolyte     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
RuthW, I thought my memory had the position of the thurifer in the Tridentine Rite be as you describe, but when I just checked my Fortescue, they both (1920 & 1958) have schematic of the elevation at high mass with the thurifer next to the MC at the south side of the altar steps. This is where my crowd parks the thurifer, too. I hope someone comes by with an answer. Some of the stiffer Anglocatholic places I've been to (though not for a looong time) put the thurifer in the midst on the pavement.
Posts: 7462 | From: The New World | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

 - Posted      Profile for jlg   Email jlg   Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
On the High Holy Days when Father figures he can get away with the maximum amount of incense in our RC church, the thurifer censes the elevations just as you describe it, RuthW.
Posts: 17391 | From: Just a Town, New Hampshire, USA | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Max.
Shipmate
# 5846

 - Posted      Profile for Max.     Send new private message       Edit/delete post 
Yeah - even I (a low church Catholic) will do incense kneeling in front of the altar, back to people.

I don't like doing it on the North Side (more common than South) or South Side

Max

--------------------
For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

Posts: 9716 | From: North Yorkshire | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  14  15  16 
 
Post new thread  
Thread closed  Thread closed
Open thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
follow ship of fools on twitter
buy your ship of fools postcards
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
 
  ship of fools