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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Recipe thread - another delicious helping
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
...Wiffles, or anyone else acquainted with Real Curry&trade: if a recipe wants roasted mustard seeds, and I use grainy mustard will it be anything like the same? We don't have all the interesting Indian shops around here so I tend to use curry recipes more as a general guide to the kind of flavours that go together.

Erm, probably not the same but it might be interesting and I don't see why it shouldn't work. On the other hand most supermarkets sell mustard seeds of one sort or another - and it seems odd that in the Mustard Capital of England you can't buy the seeds.

The different colours do have slightly different flavours and pungencies and the roasting brings out the savour wonderfully.

I agree about recipes being a guide - the couple of fish curry recipes I posted recently caused some discussion between HWMBO and Mrs E about methods and I am sure every house in the village does each one slightly differently and with different combinations of spices.

And they all work.

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
For my next question - sprouts! We still haven't used up the bag in last week's veg box and another bag has just arrived... I'm not keen on sprouts so any ideas for making them more interesting would be gratefully received

Last month's edition of Real Simple magazine had the following, which I thought sounded really good even though I'm not crazy about brussels sprouts:

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pecans

2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
1 cup pecans, roughly chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
Kosher salt and black pepper

Prepare the Brussels Sprouts
Heat oven to 400° F. On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the Brussels sprouts, pecans, oil, garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Turn the Brussels sprouts cut-side down.

Cook the Brussels Sprouts
Roast until golden and tender, 20 to 25 minutes.


Yield: Makes 8 servings

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Yangtze
Shipmate
# 4965

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quote:
Originally posted by Wiff Waff:
I agree about recipes being a guide - the couple of fish curry recipes I posted recently caused some discussion between HWMBO and Mrs E about methods and I am sure every house in the village does each one slightly differently and with different combinations of spices.And they all work.

Just to say that I've now made the tamarind one twice - for two different sets of people - and it just keeps on getting better and better.

Yuu-uum

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
Just to say that I've now made the tamarind one twice - for two different sets of people - and it just keeps on getting better and better.

Ditto. 2nd time I added the spices with a freer hand.

WW, since the fish one has been such a star, would you happen to have something along the same lines* that would work equal magic on leftover chicken?

Or (raw) mince?

Or eggs?

*ie quick to make, not vast number of spices.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Firenze, congrats on the 6000 posts!

If you want something simple and delicious made from eggs how about:

Egg Roast

Count how many people you are going to feed and hard boil the same number of eggs. Peel and set aside.

Slice a lot of onion quite thinly and crush or finely chop one [only one] clove of garlic.

Heat some oil in a pan, just a spoon or two, and when it is hot add the onion and garlic and some salt [yes, I know you don't normally add salt at the start but this is what I have been told].

Reduce heat to medium almost immediately then add a little turmeric powder and chilli powder to taste - I think chilli powder is called cayenne in North America.

Reduce heat to low after a few minutes.

When the onions are cooked [not caramelised!] put in serving dish and arrange eggs whole, halved or quartered on top.

Serve.

This goes very well with chappatis or porotta or other plain Indian bread.

If serving with rice add a few spoons of hot water after the onions are cooked and leave a few minutes, stirring occasionally, to make a gravy.

For variations you can add a little masala powder along with the chilli powder - if you can't get Egg Masala powder locally a generic curry powder will do. For more gravy add more water.

As we don't eat meat, but Mrs E does, I will have to think about the chicken curry a bit.

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Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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quote:
Originally posted by Wiff Waff:
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
...Wiffles, or anyone else acquainted with Real Curry&trade: if a recipe wants roasted mustard seeds, and I use grainy mustard will it be anything like the same? We don't have all the interesting Indian shops around here so I tend to use curry recipes more as a general guide to the kind of flavours that go together.

Erm, probably not the same but it might be interesting and I don't see why it shouldn't work. On the other hand most supermarkets sell mustard seeds of one sort or another - and it seems odd that in the Mustard Capital of England you can't buy the seeds. ...

Sorry, I was unclear - I can get mustard seeds, it's just that I didn't have any to hand and I did have grainy mustard. I did put it in anyway and it seemed to work. It's the more exotic things that are harder to come by, although I could probably get most of them if I really tried!

I can report that steaming sprouts and adding butter and nutmeg improved them no end. We'll no doubt try lots of the other suggestions while they're in season.

[ 17. December 2008, 13:50: Message edited by: Keren-Happuch ]

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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In the mid-70s I worked in a children's home where 90+% of the lads hated sprouts but one lad and I used to happily finish a huge dish of them between us whenever they were served.

We very rarely see them here, which is sad, but then I suppose we get other veg that is rarely seen in Britain, or anywhere away from here.

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Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Roseofsharon
Shipmate
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I still love sprouts the way my mother used to cook them, but I don't have them often because of the smell.
Yes, I know the smell is a result of overcooking, but that's how I like them, overcooked, mashed with butter and a good dollop of nostalgia [Hot and Hormonal]

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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Speaking of smells. . . I'm making an enormous batch of Chex™ Mix and the kitchen smells absolutely fantastically garlicky.

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philip99a
Shipmate
# 13799

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OK. I probably ought to lurk a while before I chip in here, but Marmacita - Are You Serious?? (with due respect). That recipe is all manufactured factory food. Yuk (we'll be moved to Hell in a minute) but I guess I'm interested in whether that seems a Godly way to eat.

I expect flak for smugness (yes) but tonight I had GAME. Has that featured much on this thread? Apart from wild fish, like fresh mackerel, yum and very cheap. Luckily, very luckily, my local market here in Leicester still has some folk clinging on selling wild rabbit, pigeon, pheasant, venison, partridge, grouse (expensive but delicious), wild duck, teal, hare etc etc.

So tonight I had boiled potatoes (I read somewhere recently, I think on a Government website, that we should build each meal around a basic carbohydrate ie potato, rice, pasta etc) with steamed broccoli with a touch of chili sauce, and "wild rabbit Turkish kebabs".

I bought two wild, fresh rabbits (very natural, very sustainable, there's millions of them round here, they're a pest) then boned and cubed the meat. The recipe came from The Metro, a local free newspaper (not at all eco friendly, waste of wood pulp) and means you marinade the meat in cinnamon, cumin, coriander, allspice, black pepper, hot paprika and olive oil. I ground all the spices in a pestle and mortar from whole. Then kebabed the lot on skewers with cherry tomatoes and small quartered onions. Wrapped the result in lettuce leaves. Pretty good. And I hope, healthy.

Does anyone else here eat game? I particularly like pheasant, fast roasted with bacon and some redcurrant jelly in the gravy.

I relentlessly eat steamed broccoli. I don't like it much but it has done wonders for my cholesterol level, without resorting to statins.

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We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time T. S. Elliot (Four Quartets)

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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quote:
Originally posted by philip99a:
OK. I probably ought to lurk a while before I chip in here, but Marmacita - Are You Serious?? (with due respect). That recipe is all manufactured factory food. Yuk (we'll be moved to Hell in a minute) but I guess I'm interested in whether that seems a Godly way to eat.

It's not Godly, it's snack food. I make it once a year, at the holidays, when I am entertaining a house full of people. Lighten up, for goodness' sake.

(Also: There's no "r" in my name. I did not name myself after a yeast product. [Big Grin] )

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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sewanee_angel
Shipmate
# 2908

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quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:
Originally posted by philip99a:
OK. I probably ought to lurk a while before I chip in here, but Marmacita - Are You Serious?? (with due respect). That recipe is all manufactured factory food. Yuk (we'll be moved to Hell in a minute) but I guess I'm interested in whether that seems a Godly way to eat.

It's not Godly, it's snack food. I make it once a year, at the holidays, when I am entertaining a house full of people. Lighten up, for goodness' sake.
I agree. It is the bestest savory holiday party snack food ever! I now have a craving for it.
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Tea gnome
Shipmate
# 9424

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Can anyone help me out? I've made a chilli - kind of, it has veggie mince, and sweetcorn and peppers in it. I used fresh chili. I ended up putting in four, but it's still not spicy (I have a mild palate, and can barel taste any heat at all). Is it going to develop, or do I need to do something more drastic to help it along e.g add chilli powder?
TG

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philip99a
Shipmate
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Have you got onions in there too? Needs onions I reckon.

They must be very mild chillies. Yup I'd fry up half a teaspoon of hot chilli powder with some sliced onions and then stir the lot in! Good luck! Oh go for broke, make it a level teaspoon.

If at some stage you find the whole thing too fiery (in terms of chilli) just remember that drinking water makes things worse, burning-mouth-wise. Drink milk, eat a banana or yoghurt to extinguish yr mouth. And then add lemon juice to the chilli if it's too spicy, seems to help.

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We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time T. S. Elliot (Four Quartets)

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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I'd also add a bit of ground cumin to that chili.

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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philip99a
Shipmate
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Agreed re ground cumin. I love a little added to many savoury dishes. Have you got some salt in that chilli? Lots of my friends try to cook with less and less salt these days until their food just ends up bland. Yes, many of us eat too much added salt but food does need some.

Btw do shipmates have a cupboard of ancient jars of herbs and spices with labels that say things like "Best by August 1997"? I'm embarrassed to admit that I do. Do even the whole spices have any flavour left in them? Is it dangerous even!!? Aren't most of them irradiated, "for health and safety" or have I made that up?

Trouble is, how often do I actually use cloves, juniper berries or allspice? Twice a year at most. But I still want them at hand for those two recipes each!

I do try to throw away very old dried herbs. After a couple of years they all taste like hay, imo! Some of them taste like hay when you buy them. I'm not very fond of dried herbs. Bundles of fresh ones are easy to buy here (or even grow) with a bit of effort.

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We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time T. S. Elliot (Four Quartets)

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by philip99a:
Trouble is, how often do I actually use cloves, juniper berries or allspice? Twice a year at most. But I still want them at hand for those two recipes each!

The juniper berries go in venison casseroles, the allspice in Jamacian jerk marinades, the cloves in middle eastern dishes.

I agree about the herbs - chuck 'em. About the only dried ones I keep are thyme and tarragon, which I motor through rapidly.

Thing to Do this holiday - go through cupboards and spice rack and have a major clear out. I have a particular weakness for stuff from Indian and Chinese grocers - innumerable bottles of dark brown liquid from nam pla to sushi soy, and anything with 'chili' in the name.

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philip99a
Shipmate
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
]The juniper berries go in venison casseroles, the allspice in Jamacian jerk marinades, the cloves in middle eastern dishes.

Exactly. And I eat each of those perhaps twice a year. In fact much more often with Middle Eastern (thanks to Claudia Roden's great book) but then I don't much like cloves anyway. Which is why the ones in my cupboard are probably vintage 1990. Juniper berries also very good in pork pates.

quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Innumerable bottles of dark brown liquid from nam pla to sushi soy, and anything with 'chili' in the name.

Were you and I brother and sister in another life?? I do use the strange dark brown liquids sometimes. It's when I've bought them months ago and they're as yet still unopened (so... why did I buy them?) that I question my sanity.

I agree dried tarragon is worth keeping. I'm lucky with thyme, my next door neighbour has a healthy clump in her front garden and she utterly doesn't mind me snipping the occasional sprig.

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We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time T. S. Elliot (Four Quartets)

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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I live alone and so I don't use that many herbs and spices. I keep them in the freezer, and they retain their flavor very well.

Moo

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Tea gnome
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Thanks for that - off to fry some onion, cumin and chilli powder. I think they were pretty mild, as I mistakenly licked my fingers after chopping (!) and didn't burn the mouth off myself.
TG

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philip99a
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Tea gnome: am interested to hear the result!

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We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time T. S. Elliot (Four Quartets)

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Josephine

Orthodox Belle
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We realized last night, as the snow came down, that Littlest One had never had snow cream before. So Mousethief put a baking sheet out on the picnic table on the deck to collect new snow. A couple of hours later, you couldn't see where the baking sheet was.

We chilled a large bowl, filled it with fresh snow -- a gallon. Brought it inside, added four or five heaping tablespoons of vanilla sugar, a large splash of vanilla extract, and some whole milk. Started cutting it all together with a pastry cutter, adding more milk until it started approaching the color and texture of soft-serve ice cream. (You have to work fast.)

Spoon quickly into bowls, and serve immediately.

Wonderful stuff. Heaven in a dish.

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Tea gnome
Shipmate
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It sort of worked. I ended up putting in quite a bit more than a teaspoon, because it was a fairly large quantity, and it came out a bit spicy, but perhaps still not as much as I might have liked. Next time I will spend the extra monies and buy birdseye or Scotch Bonnets or something.

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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A recommendation here for Mamacita's baked sprouts with pecans recipe - it was delicious, I really didn't expect it to taste either so good or so unlike sprouts. Given that I love sprouts (though few people love me in sprout season) if I loved it despite it not tasting of them, I reckon that counts as high praise!

AG

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I have decided that steaming and stir frying are the way forward with sprouts.

The chestnut cheesecake was very successful, although I ended up making a simplified version of the Nigella recipe. I decided that double lining a tin and baking it in a water bath was too much like hard work, so I baked it for an hour and a half in a low oven and then left it in the oven overnight to cool instead. I didn't make the rum syrup and it's very nice without, though we did serve it with cream. Oh, and I used 2 eggs instead of 6 (3 + 3 yolks). [Eek!]

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Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
A recommendation here for Mamacita's baked sprouts with pecans recipe - it was delicious, I really didn't expect it to taste either so good or so unlike sprouts. Given that I love sprouts (though few people love me in sprout season) if I loved it despite it not tasting of them, I reckon that counts as high praise!

AG

Now this is what never fails to excite me about the Ship. Someone sees a recipe in a magazine and thinks "that sounds good" and files it away, and then posts it on a website and it brings happiness to someone 4,000 miles away. I'm glad it worked out, Sandemaniac.

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Well, that was a success - not always the case with Christmas dinner (it's the weight of expectation).

For those of you wanting a stunning dinner for two, I offer Tournedos Firenze

You need -

Small, thick fillet steaks
Good madeira
Butter
White bread
Brandy
Pate
Creme fraiche
Lemon

Butter a couple of slice of good white bread on either side and put in a hottish oven on a baking tray.

Melt the butter (with a smidgen of olive oil to stop it burning) in a pan and place in it two slices of pate (it says foie gras in the original, but Ardenne pork worked fine). Add the fillet steaks and fry for two minutes on the first side, 1 on the second. Place first the pate and then the steak on the now toasted slices of bread and return to the oven while you deglaze the pan with the madeira, brandy, creme fraiche and squeeze of lemon juice. A minute should be enough. Pour over the bread/pate/steak.

It was, though I say it myself, superb.

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philip99a
Shipmate
# 13799

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Five of us ate a freerange goose from the excellent Seldom Seen Farm, near Leicester. With green peppercorn and potato stuffing. And lots of veg. Yum.

Tomorrow salad with strips of cold goose. And I'll make a rich tasty stock from the bones to use in future soups.

Same every year. I love it!

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We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time T. S. Elliot (Four Quartets)

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Reading about Firenze's delicious-sounding steak called to mind the rather magic chicken liver pâté I made the other day, more or less according to the blesséd Delia but adding a couple of tablespoons of cream, which make it smoother, richer and much easier to spread. Oh, and as I didn't have any brandy, I used a mixture of port and whisky, but it was still dead good (and dead easy).

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Here is something that HWMBO made for me yesterday - I realise that not all of you will have banana leaves readily available but some might and the others might find other means, though I'm not sure what - will foil work?

This is perfect for folks who can't eat chilli - it is tasty and spicy and chilli-free.

Clean and cube fish into bite size pieces.

Clean some ginger and place it with some curry leaves and a some green peppercorns in a grinder and whizz together with a little vinegar and a pinch of salt.

Roll fish in the wet masala and wrap in fresh banana leaf including the rest of the wet masala in the parcel.

Heat earthenware or other suitably heavy pot on the stove and add a very little oil.

Place fish parcel in pan and cover - sort of like a small Dutch oven.

Cook for ten minutes, turn parcel over and another ten minutes using medium/low heat.

Serve with whatever.

Very succulent.

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What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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FYI--don't throw the old herbs and nameless brown spicy stuff away, unless you are blessed with a pest-free garden. Yep, that's right. One witches' brew for Bambi (Thumper, Squirrelly) coming right up.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Here is something that HWMBO made for me yesterday - I realise that not all of you will have banana leaves readily available but some might and the others might find other means, though I'm not sure what - will foil work?

Foil is sort of OK with something like this. I prefer to use baking paper. No idea if that is what it's called in other parts of the world. The stuff which stops food sticking to baking trays.

OK, just looked it up and see it's also called parchment paper. It's good for cooking food in little parcels.

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Posts: 9745 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Thanks Lothlorien, silly of me - it's called Butter Paper here and is just the thing.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Wiff Waff:
Thanks Lothlorien, silly of me - it's called Butter Paper here and is just the thing.

You're welcome, Wiff Waff. Again, not sure about other parts of the world, but banana leaves are available down here in supermarkets as well as Asian shops. However, baking paper is something almost always in the cupboard.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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I'm planning to make my first Clootie dumpling. Are £1 coins, wrapped in greaseproof paper ok, or does it have to be pre-WWII silver sixpences? My granny was adamant that it had to be old sixpences with a high silver content, but I've heard of modern coins being used.
Posts: 6414 | From: North East Scotland | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
Joan_of_Quark

Anchoress of St Expedite
# 9887

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Does any kind soul know how to obtain strong food colouring so I can make really dark colours in icing without it being too liquid to pipe?

I tried to get a holly green with the regular "Supercook" type stuff from the supermarket and ended up with liquid instead of icing. So now I am assuming the professionals have access to something a little stronger.

(I did come up with a plan B for this year's cake - covered the entire cake in a thin layer of dark green over the white, let it set for a day, and sgraffitoed a design into it with an etching needle.)

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"I want to be an artist when I grow up." "Well you can't do both!"
further quarkiness

Posts: 1025 | From: The Book Depository | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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Joan_of_Quark, I'm not sure whether you're in the US, but I've seen special food colorings at craft-supply stores like Michael's, where they have a section of Wilton™ cake-decorating supplies The food coloring comes in little pots and look like the consistency of paste.

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Joan_of_Quark:
Does any kind soul know how to obtain strong food colouring so I can make really dark colours in icing without it being too liquid to pipe?

You are unlikely to get the type of product you need from a supermarket. There are specialist Cake-Decoration, or Sugarcraft shops where all sorts of goodies can be found, including little pots of edible colours in paste form. (Dark green and black were my most recent requirements, for my grandson's "Ben 10" birthday cake [Roll Eyes] )

Try Yellow Pages for a shop local to you, or if you have the time ask around for people who do cake-decorating as a hobby or small business (try the WI), they would probably tell you where they get their materials.

Or you could buy it online. Here's one such website, I'm sure there's more.

[ 29. December 2008, 08:22: Message edited by: Roseofsharon ]

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Posts: 3060 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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The other trick for intense colours using liquid food colourings is to paint the icing after you've finished using the liquid colours. I've made a bright red clown's nose doing that.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Joan_of_Quark

Anchoress of St Expedite
# 9887

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Thanks for all the help! One gap in my knowledge filled, ten million to go...

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"I want to be an artist when I grow up." "Well you can't do both!"
further quarkiness

Posts: 1025 | From: The Book Depository | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Pearl B4 Swine
Ship's Oyster-Shucker
# 11451

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I always scrape off the 'intense' color frosting, as I'd rather not eat it. It can't be any good for you.

Very dark brown is perfectly all right though, assuming it gets its color from chocolate. [Smile]

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Oinkster

"I do a good job and I know how to do this stuff" D. Trump (speaking of the POTUS job)

Posts: 3622 | From: The Keystone State | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged
Rat
Ship's Rat
# 3373

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Firenze, your Christmas dinner sounds delicious!

Our wild boar was both semi-successful and mildly disasterous. The meat (marinaded for 3 days in red wine with various spices, then basted while roasting with more red wine mixed with pomegranite juice) was very nice though not - I must say - so interesting that I'd be prepared again to pay so much more for it than a piece of good quality pork. The roast potatoes were also delicious (aren't they always?).

But due to a mix up (a real folie-a-deux) over the quantities, the sauce of cream and meat juices/marinade was unbalanced and too winey. And while I wasn't looking mum inadvertantly juiced the pomegranite who's seeds were supposed to decorate the dish.

And my mum's new recipe for roasting sprouts went terribly wrong... they were delicious inside, but you had to peel off a layer of charcoal to get there. We'll definitely try that again sometime.

So not a culinary triumph - but we all enjoyed it (even the black sprouts) and enjoyed making it, which is the important thing.

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It's a matter of food and available blood. If motherhood is sacred, put your money where your mouth is. Only then can you expect the coming down to the wrecked & shimmering earth of that miracle you sing about. [Margaret Atwood]

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Angel Wrestler
Ship's Hipster
# 13673

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By request of Moo:

Spinach and Feta Quiche. Began as a Sunset recipe which I've altered through the years.

9" deep dish pie crust
8 - 10 oz good quality feta *
4 eggs or Egg Beaters
1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese
1/2 cup low-fat milk (reduce if there is a lot of whey from the feta)
1 10-oz package of frozen chopped spinach (you could cook some fresh spinach and chop it, but why?)
1 bunch of green onions (about 6), chopped all the way up the stem
1 tbsp olive oil
GARLIC - to taste.

Preheat oven to 425 - 450 F
Thoroughly blend feta, eggs, milk, and cottage cheese, garlic and olive oil
With mixing spoon, mix in spinach (squeeze it as dry as you can) and green onions
Pour in pie shell and cook at 425- 450 for about 20-25 minutes. (the crust may cook too fast, so if it's for anyone other than family, I put aluminum foil around the edges at this point)
Reduce heat to 350 - 375 and cook for an additional 20-25 minutes.

The top will look brownish when it's done and there's a kind of "set" to it that I don't know how to explain. Oh - and your kitchen will now smell like heaven.

* the low-fat variety does not cook or crumble as well as the regular. I've also experimented through the years with goat, sheep, and cow milk feta. The sheep milk feta was bland and, IMO the cow milk is too salty but it will do. Goat milk is best if you can get it - not easy in our area.

[ 29. December 2008, 23:42: Message edited by: Angel Wrestler ]

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kingsfold

Shipmate
# 1726

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Ok, I think I've got a load of brazil nuts in the cupboard that I should probably use up at some point. I'm not a great one for desserts, so any suggestions as to how I could use them in savoury type dishes?
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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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quote:
Originally posted by Pearl B4 Swine:
I always scrape off the 'intense' color frosting, as I'd rather not eat it. It can't be any good for you.

Very dark brown is perfectly all right though, assuming it gets its color from chocolate. [Smile]

All I know is that deep red, icing roses look lovely and taste awful. [Razz]

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by kingsfold:
Ok, I think I've got a load of brazil nuts in the cupboard that I should probably use up at some point. I'm not a great one for desserts, so any suggestions as to how I could use them in savoury type dishes?

How about chopping them and tossing them with just-cooked Kenya beans and a wee squirt of sesame oil or cook them with Brussels sprouts (as you might use chestnuts)?

Or, if you haven't a sweet tooth, serve a nice cheeseboard instead of pudding with a bowl of nuts, shelled but left whole and another of apricots or big juicy raisins. I'm free on Thursday ... [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
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Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by kingsfold:
Ok, I think I've got a load of brazil nuts in the cupboard that I should probably use up at some point. I'm not a great one for desserts, so any suggestions as to how I could use them in savoury type dishes?

Nut loaf? I used a fairly large proportion of Brazils in the mixed nuts needed for a Crown Nut Roast at Christmas.
Or there is this prawn/nut.rice dish which sounds good, and looks simple.

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Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

Posts: 3060 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I've got a recipe for Bulghur and Brazil nut burgers/cutlets with orange sauce that's edible (except if the offspring is around, as Brazil nuts are another thing she's allergic to).

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
kingsfold

Shipmate
# 1726

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MMm, the prawn nut thing looks interesting - I assume you just dry cook nuts in the oven for a bit to get them toasted? Since I also think I may have lurking walnuts, nut roast may be the answer.

And I'd be happy to give the nut/bulgar burger thingies a go too, if you could send me the recipe please, Curiosity.

Piglet, cheese board with apricots & raisins sounds wonderful (though a bit gluttonous for just me). You'd be welcome, but I'm afraid I'm not free Thursday... [Smile]

Posts: 4473 | From: land of the wee midgie | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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If you've got odds and ends of different cheeses left over from Christmas as well you can make a "cheeseboard pasta bake". As I recall it's basically cooked pasta, chuck in chunks of cheese, top with nuts and bake in the oven. If anybody wants I can look up the precise recipe.

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EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged



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