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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Recipe thread - another delicious helping
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by Cottontail:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
I made the first on Sunday and it was tried today, it was on the dry side. What variables should I alter to make it more moist?
Jengie

You could try adding an extra egg. Or add fat ... butter if that works okay for your diabetic friend, or a tablespoon of olive oil. Or boil some carrot, mash it up to a puree, and mix it in.
Thanks for confirming my suspicion that what it probably needed was oil and egg. Wonder can I make the effort to get sweet potato and thereby cut the sugar down even further.

Hmm!

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

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Otter
Shipmate
# 12020

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Minimalist Guacamole:
Avacado, mashed. Lemon or lime juice and salt to taste.

Slightly more complex guacamole:
Mash your avacado (or two, or three), add onion, garlic, lemon or lime juice, salt, tomato; and hot pepper (fresh chiles, cayenne, crushed dried peppers, or even hot curry powder, they all work}. Proportions to taste.

Mayo and olive oil sound terribly odd to me, but I also like avacado chunks with olive oil, salt, and pepper, so I don't know why oil sounds odd in guac. [Smile]

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Pancho
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# 13533

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Don't forget the cilantro (coriander).

--------------------
“But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the market places and calling to their playmates, ‘We piped to you, and you did not dance;
we wailed, and you did not mourn.’"

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Courtesy of Motherboard and JB, we dined at the home of Real Guacamole and since then I have, as they say in the Pears ad, used no other.

Assemble fresh avocados, coriander, garlic, onion, chilies and lime juice (all prepped).

Ready?

Amalgamate rapidly and savagely (we have a Slovenian potato champer which does the job).

You will never want to eat guacamole more than five minutes old again in your life.

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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I think Nigel Slater gives a recipe for Guacamole which uses chopped skinned tomatoes (or should that be skinned chopped tomatoes?)

This is my take on guacamole:

1 onion, minced
2 avocadoes, chopped
2 skinned chopped tomatoes
1 red chilli, minced
coriander
garlic, minced
good dose of chilli oil
good squeeze of lemon/lime juice

Add it all together and eat.

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What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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There was a request for scone recipes on the high tea for dummies thread. Here is a very basic recipe and here is one with sultanas. The most important thing, I've discovered, is not to roll the dough out too thin or they won't rise. Baking powder makes them taste too bitter. A lot of recipes have buttermilk in them which is supposed to be lighter, but I've never tried it. My mum also always said that milk on the turn/a little bit off made good scones.

No doubt there are as many recipes as there are people though! [Smile]

--------------------
Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Yet Another Guac Recipe, this one mercifully free of mayonnaise, olive oil or tomatoes*
3 or so Hass avocados, the riper the better
2 or so Serrano chiles (or to taste)**
6 or so cloves of garlic
Juice of 3 or so limes
Several leaves of cilantro, chopped.
Salt
Ideally, you should have a mortar and pestle for this one. It's much more impressive if you've got one tucked away somewhere large enough to hold the whole mess, but, if not, you can mash the avocados elsewhere, adding the mortared stuff to it.
Peel and very roughly chop the garlic. Add it to your mortar with a fair quantity of salt; mash together into a paste. Stem and roughly chop your chiles; add them to the mortar and grind. Juice your limes, perhaps zesting one; stir in the juice/zest along with some extra salt. Chop the cilantro roughly; add it, but do not grind.
Halve your avocados, saving the stones. Either mash them in your mortar with the paste, or mash them in a bowl, then stir in the chili/garlic/lime paste and incorporate it well. After the guac is stirred, add one or two of the pits to the bowl; it will reduce browning. Allow to sit, covered, in the fridge for as long as you'll let it (which shouldn't be too long).
*If you absolutely must involve nightshades in your guac, try using tomatillos, also known as husk tomatoes or Mexican green tomatoes. Most people boil or roast them before using, but I like the tart taste of raw ones. Most tomatoes are too bland for guac and those that aren't should be eaten on their own or made into salsa. Chop the fruit, then add to the mortar after the chiles.
**You'll want to use more chiles than you think you'll need, due to how fatty ripe avocados are. The chile flavor will help cut the heavy, greasy oppressiveness of mashed not-perfectly-off-the-tree avocado. By all means retain the seeds and veins.
***That said, if you do have ripened-on-the-tree avocado, you may not want to even consider making guac. Ripe avocados are amazing on their own.
****Did I mention this whole recipe is rather inexact? Honestly, you should do whatever tastes good. I realize it's lime-laden, but that's how I like mine. The excessive garlic, though, is essential.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I've got some trout fillets that need using today. The simplest option would be to grill it but I was wondering whether it would be good in a curry or with pasta. Does anybody have any suggestions?

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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If it's good trout? Not curry. Nothing to overwhelm the flavor of the fish.
Bad trout? Slather on curry paste (just use less coconut milk/water/whatever you would normally use to thin the spice mixture) and grill it.
As for pasta, perhaps a very light white wine/cream sauce or just olive oil/garlic/parsley/trout? Actually, the latter option sounds the best: fry the trout and garlic together in plenty of oil until the trout flakes apart, then use the whole lot as a sauce for your pasta. Top with parsley.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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It wasn't very good trout! In the end we grilled it and served it with pasta and pesto with a lot of lemon and black pepper. It worked quite well and was a nice light meal but nothing to write home about.

--------------------
Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Celtic Knotweed
Shipmate
# 13008

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Having posted a recipe for butteries here in July, I finally had time to try and make them today. Success can be reported! [Yipee]

They don't taste quite as good as the ones from the baker in Dingwall, but since that's a bit far to go for a wee snack, my own baking will have to do. Might even improve with practice. [Razz]

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GoodCatholicLad
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# 9231

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I happen to love brisket, here is a pretty good recipe and it's very easy. I've made something very similar to this. To make throw it in the oven and 3 hours later voila!

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All you have is right now.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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I bought some smoked cod today to make kedgeree for a couple of friends coming round for supper on Monday. You can't get smoked haddock here, but cod should be OK. I usually put some cooked frozen peas in it; I might add some sweetcorn too as we have some in the freezer. Will report back.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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For Easter dinner today -- roast leg of lamb rubbed with a honey-mustard/herbs de Provence mixture (we do business with a local farmer who raises Icelandic sheep and lavender, and keeps a shop selling wool and lavender products); roasted vegetables -- the humble lettuce salad accompanying turned out to be a real star. I used baby leaf lettuce; a few sprigs of fennel saved from the fennel I roasted; feta cheese; some boughten honey-coated slivered almonds; and a bottled strawberry vinaigrette dressing bought on a whim because it was deeply discounted...we'd gotten it home, looked at it, thought, "Why?..." and tucked it into the fridge door. Anyway, this was light and flavorful.

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Simul iustus et peccator
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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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This sounds absolutely wonderful... maybe when I have a bit more time.

I think maybe supper rather than breakfast though.

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The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Heraclitus

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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I made the kedgeree as posted above (with the sweetcorn and peas but without the hard-boiled eggs) and though I say it what shouldn't, it was right good. Everyone seemed to like it - there was none left. Will go back to nice fishmonger again.

[Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Leaf
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# 14169

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Leftover wine: What are your favourite recipes? After hosting Easter dinner, I have quite a bit of a respectable Cabernet Sauvignon. I also have some sweet white wine: about a cup of spatlese (sweet Riesling) plus some leftover icewine. I tend to use the red for beef stew, but I'm tired of that strategy, and I really don't know what to do with the sweet white. Do you marinade? Make vinaigrette? Recipes and suggestions welcome!
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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Try making a syrup with the Spältese for poached pears. Simmer with some sugar, cloves and honey until very warm and quite thick–oh it's delicious. The red wine could work for that as well, but I'd prefer the Riesling, personally.
Icewine should be drunk. Plain and simple. It's too complicated flavor-wise to cook with, to expensive for the pot and much too tasty to use any other way.

--------------------
“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Leaf:
I have quite a bit of a respectable Cabernet Sauvignon. I also have some sweet white wine: about a cup of spatlese (sweet Riesling) plus some leftover icewine.

I struggle with the concept of having wine left over. However, if it's a feature of your life, have you got a vacu-vin? It's a little pumpy thing with rubber stoppers that draws the air out of the bottle. Even without that, restoppered and returned to the fridge, the whites should be good for several days. It would be a crime to do anything with Eiswein other than drink it.

Otherwise, make syllabub (a dessert which is basically cream whipped with wine, brandy and lemon).

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LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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I think I might use some of the cab in a wonderful beef stew.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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A delicious vegetable recipe from the South of France (this is my new favourite thing ever):

Gratin Méridional

Slice one large aubergine and two or three courgettes. Cook in salted boiling water for five minutes.

Slice one large onion and soften with a bit of olive oil.

Slice four large tomatoes.

Layer all the vegetables in a large oven dish, starting with the onions and ending with the tomatoes. In between each layer put salt, pepper, a generous sprinkling of grated cheese and a drizzle of olive oil.

Top with breadcrumbs and bake at 180° for 40 minutes.

Mmmmmmmm

(serves 3-4 as a main dish or 6-8 as a side dish)

[ 14. April 2009, 19:14: Message edited by: lady in red ]

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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That sounds wonderful. I make a much less elegant version in the skillet, in late summertime when the vegetables are all ripe locally.

Tonight we are having lamb curry with the Easter leftovers...yum. Gertie the Wonderpup is outside enjoying the bone, which she regards with a mixture of wonder and delight; I don't think she's ever had a bone that big before.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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Leaf
Shipmate
# 14169

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AristonAstuanax, just for clarity: would one poach the pears in the plain Riesling, then serve with syrup, or poach pears in the syrup? Once I know, I will definitely follow your suggestion - I like poached pears, and I think your suggested syrup will be a brilliant accompaniment. Thanks very much!

Firenze, on the concept of leftover wine: That's why I didn't mention making culinary use of a nice Sancerre, which has gone into the fridge. [Smile]

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Oh my, um . . . I'm trying to remember how it's done. While I suppose you could poach the pears, then add them to a separately made syrup, my idea (which may not be a good one) would be to poach them gently in wine (don't want to let the wine boil, but I'm not sure how practical watching your pan for the whole long cooking period would be), then, once the pears were done, add the sugar/honey (it'd be like making mulled wine, but with more fruit, less wine and lots more sugar when all was said and done) to thicken.
That should work. Actually, the more I think about it, it should work well, as says Julia Child (who recommends adding water to your poaching wine, then making the syrup).

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Leaf
Shipmate
# 14169

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Thanks for the methodology -- I get it. But I confess I was so keen on the idea of the syrup that it's already on the simmer, with ground nutmeg, clove, cinnamon, 1/2 vanilla bean pod seeds, and honey. I also threw caution to the winds and added the icewine. The aroma requires the reincarnation of Keats to write an ode to it.
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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Leftover wine ...

<**scratches head in puzzled fashion**> [Confused] [Confused]

Seriously though, Firenze's right about Vacu-vin - it was one of the most useful wedding presents we got. Wine keeps for ages with it, and certainly in good enough condition for that nice beef casserole. I don't know about pudding wines - I've only had them very occasionally, and as they tend to come in half-bottles, I have no experience of left-overs ... [Biased]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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On the OZblog in All Saints I mentioned Chickpea Soup. Here is the recipe.

Chickpea Soup

This thick, stew like soup is eaten in many countries of the Middle East, often forming the centre piece of simple peasant meals. Salads, olives, bread, and yogurt dishes are served on the side. Although soaked chickpeas are generally tender enough to eat after an hour of cooking, it is important here that they cook longer. This way the chickpeas themselves get somewhat softer, the liquid thickens considerably, and the soup develops a cohesion that it would otherwise lack.

It might be a good idea to taste the soup before putting in the lemon juice. Chickpea broth has a natural sweetness that you may prefer to leave untouched.


2 cups dried chickpeas, picked over, washed, and drained
2 medium-sized onions, peeled, and chopped
2 medium-sized boiling potatoes, peeled, and cut into ½ -inch dice
1 T. salt*, or to taste
½ t. ground turmeric
1 t. ground cumin seeds
1 t. ground coriander seeds
1/8 t. cayenne pepper, or to taste
Freshly ground black pepper

2 T. lemon juice

Soak the chickpeas in 8 cups of water for 12 hours. Drain and rinse thoroughly. Put the chickpeas, onions, and 8 cups water into a large pot and bring to a boil. Cover partially, turn heat to low, and simmer gently for 1 hour. Add the potatoes, salt, turmeric, cumin, coriander, cayenne, and another ¾ cup water. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer on very low heat for another 1 ½ hours. Stir a few times during this period. Check seasonings. Add the black pepper and lemon juice. Stir to mix.

Serves 6

*Yes, the original recipe said a Tablespoon of salt, but I put in half a teaspoon and I liked it.
I puree this with the hand blender which means the heat is more evenly distributed – when I didn’t I found the chickpeas themselves were far hotter than the liquid they were floating in.

I hope you like it as much as I do. I used cumin and coriander ground spice rather than the seeds.

Huia - off to soak the chickpeas.

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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On the OZblog in All Saints I mentioned Chickpea Soup. Here is the recipe.

Chickpea Soup

This thick, stew like soup is eaten in many countries of the Middle East, often forming the centre piece of simple peasant meals. Salads, olives, bread, and yogurt dishes are served on the side. Although soaked chickpeas are generally tender enough to eat after an hour of cooking, it is important here that they cook longer. This way the chickpeas themselves get somewhat softer, the liquid thickens considerably, and the soup develops a cohesion that it would otherwise lack.

It might be a good idea to taste the soup before putting in the lemon juice. Chickpea broth has a natural sweetness that you may prefer to leave untouched.


2 cups dried chickpeas, picked over, washed, and drained
2 medium-sized onions, peeled, and chopped
2 medium-sized boiling potatoes, peeled, and cut into ½ -inch dice
1 T. salt*, or to taste
½ t. ground turmeric
1 t. ground cumin seeds
1 t. ground coriander seeds
1/8 t. cayenne pepper, or to taste
Freshly ground black pepper

2 T. lemon juice

Soak the chickpeas in 8 cups of water for 12 hours. Drain and rinse thoroughly. Put the chickpeas, onions, and 8 cups water into a large pot and bring to a boil. Cover partially, turn heat to low, and simmer gently for 1 hour. Add the potatoes, salt, turmeric, cumin, coriander, cayenne, and another ¾ cup water. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer on very low heat for another 1 ½ hours. Stir a few times during this period. Check seasonings. Add the black pepper and lemon juice. Stir to mix.

Serves 6

*Yes, the original recipe said a Tablespoon of salt, but I put in half a teaspoon and I liked it.
I puree this with the hand blender which means the heat is more evenly distributed – when I didn’t I found the chickpeas themselves were far hotter than the liquid they were floating in.

I hope you like it as much as I do. I used cumin and coriander ground spice rather than the seeds.

Huia - off to soak the chickpeas.

--------------------
Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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Apologies re double post. Hosts feel free to delete - it got stuck then I couldn't edit [Waterworks]

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Looks good, Huia. We love chickpeas, lentils, all sorts of beans here and with winter coming up, good hearty soups are ideal, particularly when hometimes of some are uncertain.

Think I might use the slow cooker for the actual soup.

[ 20. April 2009, 09:56: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Hebdom
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# 14685

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Lothlorien, do you use the slow cooker to cook the chickpeas? It's by far the easiest. [Big Grin]
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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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My MiL did a beautiful soup that was a meal in itself, and I enjoy making it. Nice meaty bones simmered with onions and celery leaves; cooled, skimmed, and the meat scraped off the bones. Meat & broth cooked up again full of chopped veges and a handful of rice. And finally, the Greek thing, beaten egg(s) with some lemon juice added very carefully* to make it creamy.
Nana would have me buy pork trotters and lamb but beef's fine.

*If not carefully it will curdle. Soup must cool a little; then gradually stir some of the soup into the egg/lemon (avgo-limone), finally stir this into the soup.

A new discovery in a recent paper: twice-cooked yellow potatoes.
Use small Agria potatoes. Scrub, don't peel, boil in salted water until half-cooked (not soft). Let them cool, then put into a shallow oven dish (lined with oiled foil) and gently flatten them with a masher till about one inch thick. Brush (I spray) with good oil, sprinkle with salt and bake uncovered at 200°C till crisp and golden, 15-20 minutes. Nice.

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

Posts: 2629 | From: Matarangi | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Hebdom:
Lothlorien, do you use the slow cooker to cook the chickpeas? It's by far the easiest. [Big Grin]

I was counting that as part of the soup. I would probably soak them in a large bowl as it would be easy to drain.

Slow cooker gets used a lot for soups here by me and DIL also makes good stuff in it.

GG, that soup is very good with white fish too.

[ 20. April 2009, 10:55: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Posts: 9745 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
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# 13815

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A couple of random thoughts.

Poach the pears in the wine, honey and spice mix, gently, but fast enough to evaporate the alcohol; the sharpness of raw alcohol does not go well with the fruit. If the syrup is not thick enough when the pears are cooked, remove them and rapidly boil down the liquid. Red wine is better than even a sweet white, but both are delicious, with some double cream; the King Island yoghurt with honey and cinnamon goes well also. The red wine pears are fantastic hot in late autumn or winter. White wine poached peaches, apricots and so forth make a good dessert in summer, served cold and again with double cream. I don't think red would go. Maybe with plums, but I've never tried that.

Vacuvins are a great invention, especially when 1 in the family is on a diet and another is too young to drink. Depending on the quality of the wine, a red will keep on the shelf for up to a week, a white in the fridge even longer. By then I would have drunk it in any event. There is a bit of a drop in quality. If it's a really top red, I would invite a neighbour in to help me finish it off.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

Posts: 7028 | From: Warrawee NSW Australia | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
The red wine pears are fantastic hot in late autumn or winter.
I'd very definitely second that. I did them once or twice in Stones green ginger wine and that was pleasant too. I prefer red wine and some cream but ginger was nice for a change.

If you don't like the idea of wine and pears [Ultra confused] then a small amount of water, some brown sugar with a bit of cream at the end is also good.

Now I think about it, there are pears downstairs...

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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We've been eating rather high on the hog here as we work on emptying out the freezer.

This weekend, when temperatures soared to almost summertime levels, we grilled steelhead -- a kind of large freshwater salmony-trouty fish that's plentiful in the Great Lakes but not easy to find in the supermarket; when we happened to see steelhead filets in the store one day we said, "Gotta try that" and purchased some freeze. So we rubbed them with a spicy garlic rub we'd gotten some time ago at Cabela's sporting-goods store, over charcoal enhanced with beer-soaked beechwood chips. (I know that some communities have banned charcoal grilling because of the smoke, but we love it -- we use natural lump charcoal, which really is as easy to use as the nasty chemical briquets and imparts such a purer flavor to the food. And we've played around with various types of grilling chips, a handful or so of which you soak in water or other liquid for a half hour before tossing on white, food-ready coals...at the end of the summer season grilling supplies tend to go on sale, so we stock up on fruitwood, cedar or other chips.) Anyway, steelhead is a relatively fatty fish that can hold up to grilling; and we used a fish basket to keep the filets intact. I also grilled asparagus spears; rolled them in olive oil, sea salt and a bit of pepper, then wrapped them up in aluminum foil and stuck them on the grill for a few minutes before adding the fish.

Very good. The fish was flaky and delicious -- milder than conventional salmon, by the way, but the same pleasing color. The asparagus was fork tender and slightly browned...nutty and sweet.

Today DP is making a pot of black bean chili using locally grown beans -- Michigan being a major dry-bean producer in the US -- and some cherry chorizo we picked up on our travels in cherry country in northern Michigan. This chorizo isn't hard-smoked like Spanish chorizo, but the consistency of regular pork sausage; and in addition to the usual spiciness there's a hint of richness/sweetness that comes from the cherries. (Northern Michigan cherry marketers and food artisans are quite creative in integrating cherries into other foods in interesting ways.)

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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For Nina's soup (that's my MiL) I should have listed our usual veges: potato, carrot, parsnip, leek, celery, swede.

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

Posts: 2629 | From: Matarangi | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Leaf
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# 14169

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So I wound up making... Riesling taffy! I was getting impatient waiting for the spatlese/icewine/spice mix to reduce, so I added some sugar, thinking, "This should thicken it up nicely." Boy howdy, did it ever. When I realized what was happening, I threw in a couple of knobs of cold butter and whisked it. The result is very interesting, if not at all what I'd intended: a grapey-tangy spicy taffy.

I consider the product Phase One of a two-step process [Big Grin] ; I'm going to thin it with apple juice and serve it over pork tenderloin.

Thanks anyway, AristonAstuanax. I should have waited and followed your recipe! I have made poached pears before: Bosc pears in spiced red wine, hollowed out from the bottom, filled with a Stilton/walnut/cream cheese mix. Fab. To gild the lily, the filling mix can also contain pancetta if you want to serve this as a savoury instead of a sweet.

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Leaf
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# 14169

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Meant to add crisped pancetta - presumably you know not to add raw bacon to a filling!
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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Hey, wine-flavored candy–sounds just fine in my book!
That said, savory pears do sound rather wonderful, though I'm afraid I'll be using smoked stripy bacon instead of @#$% expensive pancetta . . .
Of all the things I miss about living in the EU, the price of certain foods (cheeses especially–oh how I miss good Red Leicester) is up there. I'll never forget the look on my then-girlfriend's face when, upon returning from Italy, she saw the price for real mozzarella (the kind that comes in balls with some liquid in the package); after having looked on a buffala mozzarella and procutto on baugette sandwich as a cheap lunch for several months . . .

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Huia
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# 3473

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Thanks G G, you answered the question I was going to ask.

I've got a lentil soup recipe I like too, but I need to find it. I like the chickpeas better but the lentil one has the advantage that you can nake it from scratch in about 45 mins - an hour.

Huia

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Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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Huia I love chickpea soup and was going to have a go at your one (I used to do a spinach and chickpea soup but lost the recipe years ago - I guess its similar just with spinach!)

I tend to use canned chickpeas when cooking simply to save all the soaking palaver - is that something that is really frowned upon as being Bad and of the Devil? Should I get into doing The Real Thing?

Also the notation is different to here but I am assuming a t. is teaspoon and a T. a tablespoon?

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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Speaking of lentils, we were watching "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" on the Food Network last night, and Guy Fieri was visiting a little diner somewhere -- didn't catch the city -- whose French owner/chef serves fast, inexpensive French provincial food -- salads, pates, baguette sandwiches with wonderful bread and fillings, etc. Anyway, one of the big sellers there is cold lentil salad topped with shrimp. We found it interesting that, pre-saladization, the lentils are cooked in red wine with garlic and herbes de Provence. We are going to have to try that.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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We pressure cook our chickpeas - and most pulses. It is quick and easy and saves both time and cooking gas. HWMBO and Mrs E know just how many whistles everything needs.

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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My favourite lentil soup (largely nicked off Gary Rhodes)

Chop 2 carrots, 2 sticks of celery, 1 onion and a couple of rashers of smoky bacon (leave this out if you want to make a vegetarian version - I imagine you could also add some garlic but it disagrees with me so I don't). Soften in a bit of butter / olive oil.

Add one glass of green lentils and 1½ litres of chicken or vegetable stock and salt. Put on a lid and simmer for about 40 minutes until the lentils are soft.

Use a blender to break up the soup as much as you want. If you want to make a smooth purée you will need to add more stock, but personally I prefer it to still have a bit of texture.

Actually, on my side of the planet it’s getting a bit warm for this kind of thing now. I think I’ve probably made my last one until next autumn. But it’s awesome winter food - healthy, filling comforting and cheap.

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Hebdom
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# 14685

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quote:
Originally posted by lady in red:
My favourite lentil soup (largely nicked off Gary Rhodes)

Actually, on my side of the planet it’s getting a bit warm for this kind of thing now. I think I’ve probably made my last one until next autumn. But it’s awesome winter food - healthy, filling comforting and cheap.


Posts: 163 | From: Terra australis | Registered: Mar 2009  |  IP: Logged
Hebdom
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# 14685

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Oops, I've stuffed up!

In reply to Lady in Red, here in the southern part of OZ it is autumn, the best time of the year, with warm sunny days and cool nights, so the lentil soup recipe is most appropriate - it's just coming in to soup weather - bliss! [Razz]

Should be doing menu planning now, not getting sidetracked here. Will add the lentil soup to next week's menu....

Posts: 163 | From: Terra australis | Registered: Mar 2009  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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All this talk of lentil soup and slow cookers mad me want to tell you about Sandy's Spiced Winter Soup (named after my nephew), which I made at the weekend:

Chop 2-3 large potatoes, 4-5 large-ish carrots, 1 very small swede (or parsnip) and 2 medium onions and sweat them in 2-3 oz butter and a little chilli oil with 1 tsp mixed spice and ½ tsp each cinnamon, nutmeg and chilli powder over a low heat for about 15 minutes.

Transfer them to a slow cooker, add 2½ - 3 pints stock (made with 3 ham stock cubes) and a couple of handfuls of small red lentils and cook on High for about 4 hours (or overnight on Low). Your house will now smell divine.

Season to taste with salt and pepper, then whizz with one of those hand-held whizzy-whizz thingies until smooth. Stir in a small carton of cream and taste to check the seasoning again (and again, and again [Smile] ).

We're relatively new to this slow-cooker thing - David bought one at a church auction last year and I thought, what the hell do we want with one of those? They're for Organised People, not like us. I'm glad he did though - they're really rather fun, and great for taking things to pot-luck parties, as you don't need oven space.

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alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
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# 13815

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That soup sounds great Piglet but I think we'd use a meaty ham bone or ham hock instead of the cubes. Perhaps miss the chili and chili oil as well, but add a few ground juniper berries instead?

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

Posts: 7028 | From: Warrawee NSW Australia | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
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# 13815

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Not a double post, but did not reach the edit button in time.

Slow cookers went through an unfashionable period, but they're terrific. Madame D and I use ours a lot. On Saturdy afternoons in winter, one or other of us will brown a joint, then put it in the cooker with some onions and wine (deglazing the pan we've browned the joint and fried the onions in) along with some herbs and carrots. The perhaps add some dried porcini mushrooms rinsed to get rid of any grit, but not soaked. Turn the cooker to high. The porcinis soften as they cook in the wine and juices. We then head off to watch the Firsts Rugby at school if it's a home game, and join people for a drink after. When we get home, rapidly reduce the juices and perhaps add a bit of cream. A green salad and there's the main course. A simple starter, some cheese and a pastry fom the patisserie, and an easy dinner with friends.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

Posts: 7028 | From: Warrawee NSW Australia | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged



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