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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Recipe thread - another delicious helping
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Addendum to the Pavaka recipe

Snip off the string or whatever before you serve them!

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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Anyone have a sag aloo recipe with the sort of ingredients I might have? I followed a recipe yesterday that was spinach, potatoe, garum masala, cardamon, and a couple of other spices and onions but it seemed a bit bland and not as nice as the one we get from the nice Indian Restaurant downstairs.... should I just add *more* of what I have?
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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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quote:
Originally posted by Emma Louise:
Anyone have a sag aloo recipe with the sort of ingredients I might have? I followed a recipe yesterday that was spinach, potatoe, garum masala, cardamon, and a couple of other spices and onions but it seemed a bit bland and not as nice as the one we get from the nice Indian Restaurant downstairs.... should I just add *more* of what I have?

Well, I'd suggest adding some, not a lot, tomato to the gravy to give it more flavour and possibly a little chilli powder if you like more heat. Often when adding tomato it is good to add just a little sugar to round the flavour a little.

Chopped fresh tomato added at the end would work or a little tinned tomato or tomato paste added earlier.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I've got a few food/recipe related questions -

1) What can I do with a very small quantity of curd cheese left over from a topping for carrot cake?

2) We got another mystery vegetable last week. It looks like something in the chard/spinach line but it's bobbly like savoy cabbage. Any ideas what it might be or how to cook it?

3) Red cabbage - I've found lots of recipes for braised red cabbage but they all seem rather complicated and want extra ingredients like shallots or apples. I just want a nice, simple way to cook red cabbage!

Thanks. [Smile]

--------------------
Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
...3) Red cabbage - I've found lots of recipes for braised red cabbage but they all seem rather complicated and want extra ingredients like shallots or apples. I just want a nice, simple way to cook red cabbage!

Thanks. [Smile]

Simply chop and wash then fry in a little oil - pop some mustard seeds in the oil first if you want. If you have some fresh grated coconut or some unsweetened dessicated coconut moistened with a little warm water add that a minute or two before it is ready. A squeeze of lemon juice just before you take it off the heat and serve!

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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LOL!

Tonight we're having lamb chops (cleaning out the freezer...we'd been saving these for numerous special occasions that didn't come to pass)...I wouldn't normally think of lamb and apples as going together, but after reading some interesting recipes online we decided to experiment by using a version of our cider brine and some French-ish herbs. We'll see how this goes, especially since we got home late last night and had to delay their grilling until tonight. I trust we won't wind up with pickled chops.

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Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:

1) What can I do with a very small quantity of curd cheese left over from a topping for carrot cake?

I'd spread it on a Scottish oatcake with a little quince or apple butter and serve it as a snack.
quote:

2) We got another mystery vegetable last week. It looks like something in the chard/spinach line but it's bobbly like savoy cabbage. Any ideas what it might be or how to cook it?

Sounds like Curly Kale . Sorry, can't help with a recipe as I've never cooked or eaten it.

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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If it is curly kale (and maybe even if it isn't...) this recipe for curly kale & italian sausage soup sounds nice.

ETA If I have red cabbage I usually chop it up, add an onion, splash a bit of balsamic vinegar and olive oil, season and bung in the oven for about 45 minutes. With an apple it is even nicer, I think, but it's fine just like that

[ 29. September 2009, 07:32: Message edited by: Dormouse ]

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What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

Posts: 3042 | From: 'twixt les Bois Noirs & Les Monts de la Madeleine | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
sweetheart
Apprentice
# 14272

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I've been sitting here for about 20minutes thinking that a small snackrel for elevenses is just what myself and my 'I've got man-flu' OH need.

Does anyone have any enlightened recipes for elevenses-stlye snackrels such as might be fitting?

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
If it is curly kale (and maybe even if it isn't...) this recipe for curly kale & italian sausage soup sounds nice.

ETA If I have red cabbage I usually chop it up, add an onion, splash a bit of balsamic vinegar and olive oil, season and bung in the oven for about 45 minutes. With an apple it is even nicer, I think, but it's fine just like that

It's not curly kale. Will have to try and post a picture.

What temperature oven, Dormouse? That sounds nice.

--------------------
Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ferdzy
Shipmate
# 8702

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Keren-Happuch, is it lacinato (or dinosaur) kale, do you think?

http://www.theslowcook.com/2009/07/01/braised-kale/

Posts: 252 | From: Ontario, Canada | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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Yes, that looks like it! Thanks. [Smile]

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Figbash

The Doubtful Guest
# 9048

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I thought I would post this, just to prove that you can do something interesting with sprouts, so here goes:

Sprouts a la Figbash

  • First boil your sprouts
  • Strain them in a colander and then put them back into the same saucepan you used for the boiling, which you have now taken off the heat (so we have one hot saucepan full of sprouts, but no water)
  • Mash
  • Add a tablespoon of white wine vinegar
  • A a teaspoon of granulated sugar
  • Stir
  • Take a small amount (about 4 slices) of very thinly cut cheddar cheese and add to the mix
  • Stir until cheese is fully melded in to the sprouts and can no longer be distinguished as a distinct element
  • Serve
  • Eat
JoannaP, who hates green vegetables in all their forms, is actually prepared to eat this. 'Nuff said.
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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
If it is curly kale (and maybe even if it isn't...) this recipe for curly kale & italian sausage soup sounds nice.

ETA If I have red cabbage I usually chop it up, add an onion, splash a bit of balsamic vinegar and olive oil, season and bung in the oven for about 45 minutes. With an apple it is even nicer, I think, but it's fine just like that

It's not curly kale. Will have to try and post a picture.

What temperature oven, Dormouse? That sounds nice.

Oven temperature? Do I have to choose? Usually I bung it in at whatever temperature everything else needs. Otherwise at the default temperature of somewhere between 180°- 200° C for as long as it takes. I'm not a very precise cook...

--------------------
What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

Posts: 3042 | From: 'twixt les Bois Noirs & Les Monts de la Madeleine | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
sllc
Shipmate
# 12707

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I have a question for all you Brits. [Smile]

I wanted to try this recipe One-Pot Chicken Pilaf but I don't know how much a "mug" is. Can someone help me, please? [Hot and Hormonal]

Posts: 179 | From: Atlanta, GA USA | Registered: Jun 2007  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by sllc:
I have a question for all you Brits. [Smile]

I wanted to try this recipe One-Pot Chicken Pilaf but I don't know how much a "mug" is. Can someone help me, please? [Hot and Hormonal]

Er, well, its a mug. A medium-large cup usually used for drinking tea or coffee.

The very fact that they used such a measure probably tells you that it doesn't matter how big the mug is! As in fact it doesn't in this recipe - the point is that the ratio of rice to stock is correct. And you use the same mug to cook both. So if you want a more rice-rich meal, use a bigger mug. Less rice, use a smaller one. Use whatever mug you want for the amount of rice you intend to eat.

Most mugs are probably around 250ml for what its worth.

--------------------
Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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A mugs a mug. It is not a precise measure, I would guess about 1.5 - 2 cups depending on cup size and mug size. Or of course you could just buy one of the Ships mugs!

Jengie

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Leaf
Shipmate
# 14169

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The US does not use metric measure, usually. Try 1 cup.
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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by Leaf:
The US does not use metric measure, usually. Try 1 cup.

A mugs is not metric! It goes with "a handful" , "a pinch of" and that sort of measure! That is go to your cupboard, take out an average size mug and use that.

Jengie

--------------------
"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Leaf
Shipmate
# 14169

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That's funny. I was actually responding to ken's post, contributing a suggestion in metric to an American shipmate.

For the record, I live in Canada, which does use metric measure, so I am quite familiar with it. You are right, JengieJon: a mug is not a metric measurement.

That's what happens with cross-posting.

[ 02. October 2009, 18:08: Message edited by: Leaf ]

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Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

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I have found that the average mug holds half a pint, (10 fl oz), which I believe is equivalent to an American 'cup'. An English 'cup' measurement is 8 fl oz. (Or at least it used to be, according to my older recipe books).
But ken is right, when it comes to measuring rice what matters is to make sure that you use the same receptacle to measure the rice and the water, keeping the ratio between the two to that stated in the recipe.

--------------------
Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

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sllc
Shipmate
# 12707

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quote:
Originally posted by sllc:
I have a question for all you Brits. [Smile]

I wanted to try this recipe One-Pot Chicken Pilaf but I don't know how much a "mug" is. Can someone help me, please? [Hot and Hormonal]

Many thanks to you all that answered my question. [Smile]

I'm going to whip this up tomorrow and will let you all know how it turns out.

Posts: 179 | From: Atlanta, GA USA | Registered: Jun 2007  |  IP: Logged
Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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So I have this jicama and have been meaning to make a jicama slaw out of it . . .
One problem, though. I have no clue how to make a good jicama slaw; there may be fifteen bazillion recipes on the Interwubs, but really, that just makes me a bit more confused. Should I use a cabbage of some sort? Should I use some weird spice or herb? Should it be spicy or a mild contrast to Ariston's Famed Salsa Verde? All I know is that I want it with The Aforementioned Vegetable, carrots and a @#$£ of lime juice; beyond that, I'm up for advice.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

Posts: 6849 | From: The People's Republic of Balcones | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I'm still defeated by red cabbage. Nothing seems to get it soft although the flavour with onion, apple and balsamic is good. [Frown]

--------------------
Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Here is a cake recipe I made recently for a potluck.

Pineapple cake

2 c. flour
2 c. sugar
2 teasp. baking soda
½ teasp. salt
2 eggs
½ c. nuts
20-oz can crushed pineapple, not drained

Combine ingredients and mix thoroughly. Pour batter into a 9" x 13" pan and bake at 350° about forty minutes.

Frosting

4 oz. butter or margarine
4 oz. cream cheese
2 c. confectioner's sugar
1 teasp. vanilla
a little milk to give a good spreading consistency

Mix frosting ingredients, and spread on cake. Do not remove cake from pan until it is served.

This cake is delicious, but it's very moist and crumbly. That's why you need to leave it in the pan. It's not suitable for formal occasions, but it's very well received on informal occasions.

Moo

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Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Josephine

Orthodox Belle
# 3899

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In April 2007, I posted a recipe for baked ribs on the recipe thread "Second Course." I've lost the recipe! When I search for the recipe using the ship's search function, it tells me it's there, but of course if I click the link, it tells me it can't find the thread. I've checked Oblivion and Limbo, too.

Can anyone help?

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Posts: 10273 | From: Pacific Northwest, USA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
I'm still defeated by red cabbage. Nothing seems to get it soft although the flavour with onion, apple and balsamic is good. [Frown]

Have you tried the blessed Delia?

As it's cooked for a long time, it's quite soft. Word of advice: wear plastic gloves while handling it to stop your hands turning blue.

Good luck. [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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We had rabbit today. I grew up in a hunting/fishing family, and I love rabbit, but this was a new experience for DP. (We went to a farm open house this weekend where I had the opportunity to buy a dressed rabbit.)

I dredged it in seasoned flour, then browned it nicely in olive oil...put that in a crockpot, then sauteed some onions, one garlic clove and diced carrots and celery and added those to the pot. I added a mixture of broth and beer to the pot, along with some fresh sage, thyme, marjoram and parsley from the herb garden. Wonderful stuff with mashed potatoes...I had a bag of Swiss chard from the garden that needed dealing with so I braised that with a little garlic and finished it with a splash of balsamic vinegar.

My other garden cleanup project were four small eggplant saved from our first hard frost. I am attempting a small batch of baba ganoush with these...I have the ingredients all mixed together, but it tastes kind of "meh" to me. And now I'm wondering what to do with the rest of the tahini.

--------------------
Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
# 2522

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Daaamn, that sounds good. Only had rabbit once, always wanted to try it again.

[ 06. October 2009, 01:23: Message edited by: Kelly Alves ]

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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Ohhh, rabbit! That brings back happy childhood memories! [Yipee]

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Posts: 18017 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
Daaamn, that sounds good. Only had rabbit once, always wanted to try it again.

But... But... that's cannibalistic! [Eek!]

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Even more so than I was before

Posts: 20466 | From: No longer where I was | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I realise that I have little chance of recreating many of the wonderful dishes we had in China the last couple of weeks - not least because I have very little idea of what many of them were*.

But I am definitely going to adopt a more fearless attitude to chilis. One bowl of - pleasantly spicy - noodles had 25 whole dried ones.

The other trick I picked up was using sesame oil, not to cook in, but added at the end as a seasoning.

*Though one of them was definitely crispy-fried rabbit.

[ 06. October 2009, 10:41: Message edited by: Firenze ]

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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DP was so funny. She's been under the weather anyway, and was saying, "I don't want that much to eat"...I suspected that she was developing cold feet about trying the rabbit, so I made her a little plate of leg, mash and gravy...there was a pause, and then she began, "Well, this is interesting...a little like chicken, but not...savory...rich...a little taste of game...how did you make this again?...I would have this again...oh, yes...mmmm...this is really good."

For me the dish brought back memories of my growing-up. My longsuffering mother refused to eat game, but despite never tasting such stuff she cooked it wonderfully. I used her basic recipe but pumped up the flavor with the beer and more herbs. We also have delicious homegrown carrots -- they are so much better than supermarket carrots -- and they added richness and sweetness.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ann

Curious
# 94

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quote:
Originally posted by Josephine:
In April 2007, I posted a recipe for baked ribs on the recipe thread "Second Course." I've lost the recipe! When I search for the recipe using the ship's search function, it tells me it's there, but of course if I click the link, it tells me it can't find the thread. I've checked Oblivion and Limbo, too.

Can anyone help?

I found this - it;s from February 2008, but it's the only ribs one - is it the one you wanted?

quote:

Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on 08 February, 2008 06:07 AM :

It's not Lent yet for us Orthodox types, so I've got a couple of super-easy recipes for ribs.

Super-easy pork spare ribs
The Day Before
Cut the ribs in to serving-sized pieces.
Wrap the ribs in a double layer of aluminum foil. (You can have several pieces of ribs in the packet, but don't stack them up on each other.)
Bake at 350F for an hour and a half.

Remove the ribs from the oven.
Pour a cup or so of barbecue sauce into the bottom of a glass baking dish.
Unwrap the ribs, and put them in a single layer in the baking dish. Pour more barbecue sauce over the top.
Cover tightly and refrigerate overnight.

The Next Day
Spray a broiler pan generously with Pam.
Move the ribs from the baking dish in which they've been marinating to the broiler pan.
Bake at 350F for about 30 minutes, until they're hot all the way through.

Super easy beef short ribs
Cut the ribs into serving sized pieces.
In a heavy skillet, brown the pieces of ribs on all sides.
Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper.
Move ribs to a baking dish (I use a deep cast iron skillet).
Add enough red wine to the skillet that the ribs are about half covered.
Cover the baking dish tightly.
Bake at 325F for two hours.

Remove ribs to a serving dish. Separate the grease from the wine and juices left in the pan. Discard the grease. Make a gravy from what's left.

I've got the Recipe Thread - Second Helping saved on my hard drive - in Printer Friendly form - if anyone wants it, I'll work out how to zip it up and send to anyone who PMs me with an email that can take attachments.

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Ann

Posts: 3271 | From: IO 91 PI | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ann

Curious
# 94

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Hang on - if you look at the first post on the first page of this thread - it points to the previous thread.

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Ann

Posts: 3271 | From: IO 91 PI | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Josephine

Orthodox Belle
# 3899

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quote:
Originally posted by Ann:
I found this - it;s from February 2008, but it's the only ribs one - is it the one you wanted?

That's it! Thank you! When I searched for the post, I could have sworn the search said April 2007. I didn't think it had been that long. But I know the search thing is weird.

Thank you so much for finding that!

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I've written a book! Catherine's Pascha: A celebration of Easter in the Orthodox Church. It's a lovely book for children. Take a look!

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Tea gnome
Shipmate
# 9424

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So, a while ago, I smelled a box of Lapsang Souchong tea in Whittards, and decided that this was Something I Must Have. Having brewed a cup and decided that, actually, I didn't like it much, I'm left with a box of tea.

Yesterday I made a vegetable stew type item (Onions softened, butternut squash, sweet potato, tin of tomatoes. Also added a small tin of borlotti beans. With hindsight, this wasn't a great idea).

First thing I did was peel and cut up about half the amount of sweet potato I planned to use. I soaked this in about half a pint of Lapsang Souchong til I was ready to use it. After, I added about half the tea into the pan.
It's worked quite well, adding subtle smokiness. This is gratifying as flatmate expressed grave doubts and looked [Paranoid] but enjoyed it.
I used a bit of the tea as well to liquid the tomato puree, turmeric and paprika that I put in.
I'm thinking of adding it to cake next.

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Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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quote:
Originally posted by Tea gnome:
So, a while ago, I smelled a box of Lapsang Souchong tea in Whittards, and decided that this was Something I Must Have. Having brewed a cup and decided that, actually, I didn't like it much, I'm left with a box of tea.

Never mind cake. Donate it to your friendly neighbourhood grad student (I *heart* Lapsang Souchong). [Big Grin]

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Tea gnome:
... Lapsang Souchong [...] Having brewed a cup and decided that, actually, I didn't like it much, I'm left with a box of tea.

Or possibly a box containing a blend of essence of dirty sock, eighty-year old smoked Norwegian cheese powder, and freeze-dried mouldy privet flowers.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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Depending on one's sense of adventure, I know that some people have had some success using tea in homemade ice creams, sorbets and shortbreads. At our favorite restaurant they also had an intriguing small dish on the menu recently, goat cheese ravioli in an mushroom-and-tea broth, with sauteed mushrooms on the side.

At our place today we're not nearly as posh -- navy bean soup for supper. Tomorrow we are making applesauce to can.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
quote:
Originally posted by Tea gnome:
So, a while ago, I smelled a box of Lapsang Souchong tea in Whittards, and decided that this was Something I Must Have. Having brewed a cup and decided that, actually, I didn't like it much, I'm left with a box of tea.

Never mind cake. Donate it to your friendly neighbourhood grad student (I *heart* Lapsang Souchong). [Big Grin]
*AHEM*
Donate it to this FNGS, who needs it far more. Lapsang is AMAZING.
That being said, I have had some Lapsang-marinated salmon at a tea house in Austin that was pretty dang good. I'm not sure exactly how to reconstruct it--it was lightly sweet, somewhat tea-y, but nowhere near overwhelming--but if anyone has any ideas, let's have at it!

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Sparrow
Shipmate
# 2458

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quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
Depending on one's sense of adventure, I know that some people have had some success using tea in homemade ice creams, sorbets and shortbreads. At our favorite restaurant they also had an intriguing small dish on the menu recently, goat cheese ravioli in an mushroom-and-tea broth, with sauteed mushrooms on the side.

I tried tea flavoured cookies earlier this year in China, and brought a box back with me. Shouldn't have bothered. One or two is nice, once - but no more.

Took them down to church for after-service coffee, not explaining what they were, and they did get eaten - people sampled one and wandered off with a puzzled expression.


[Frown]

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
I'm still defeated by red cabbage. Nothing seems to get it soft although the flavour with onion, apple and balsamic is good. [Frown]

Have you tried the blessed Delia?

As it's cooked for a long time, it's quite soft. Word of advice: wear plastic gloves while handling it to stop your hands turning blue.

Good luck. [Smile]

I tried something along those lines, but it still came out hard. I needed the oven temperature higher for the other things I was cooking at the same time. Don't know how that would affect it.

I made a one-pot rice dish similar to the one sllc linked to above this evening and threw the last of the red cabbage into that - and this time it did get softened up. Lost its colour though. There was rather a lot left over so I'm wondering how to reheat it safely without it drying out or getting too soggy. Any suggestions or tips would be gratefully received!

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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Keren-Heppuch, you've got a slow cooker? Red cabbage works in there, comes out soft and you can freeze the excess for another day. Nice to eat with Glamorgan sausages if you're vegetarian.

The other thing that I like with red cabbage is treating it like white cabbage in coleslaw, but making up the salad with onion and blue cheese dressing.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Carex
Shipmate
# 9643

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I just brought in 20+ kilos of not-yet-ripe tomatoes in anticipation of the impending frost. I don't have the time or inclination to can them. Does anyone have some simple recommendations?

I'm considering chopping a big potful of them and adding lentils, and probably some of the green chilies that I collected earlier. That should give me a few days of meals at any rate.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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When I still lived at home, my dad's tomato crop (in a greenhouse) had an inconvenient habit of ripening while he and Mum were away on holiday. I was instructed to open-freeze the tomatoes and put them in suitably-sized plastic bags once they were frozen. IIRC they were fine for making sauces and soups when defrosted, but no use for just being tomatoes.

Other possibilities might be making soups and sauces and freezing them, or the dreaded jars of "grn. tom. chut" that lurk at the back of the larder or jump out at you at church fetes.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Make a metric @#$%ton of salsa, that'd be what I'd do! Green tomatoes may not be as good as my beloved tomatillos, but they're a lot less troublesome, being husk-free and all, and will do in a pinch.

So, herein follows AA's Infamous Salsa Verde:
About a kilo of raw tomatillos/green tomatoes, husked, rinsed and quartered
A white onion or two
Lots of garlic–I use about five cloves, personally
A bunch (as in, "a bundle," not, "a lot," though I'll go with that definition too) of cilantro
The juice of at least two, preferably three or four, limes
The zest of at least one lime
1-2 habanero chiles/5-8 serranos, seeds, veins and all
About two or three teaspoons of salt
Perhaps a few grinds of black pepper or a dash or three of cumin; coriander seed might not be missed either

Put the lot in a food processor, starting with the tomatillos; pulse until slightly reduced in volume. Add the onion, do the same. Throw in the rest and process to your desired consistency.

Look, this isn't exactly an exact science; I'm always adjusting it each time I make it, usually to make it more citrus-y and spicy, rather than focusing on the onion like I used to. Adjust everything to taste as you go. One thing not up for negotiation, though, is the lime juice; you must use more of it than you think you'll need. Using vinegar is frowned upon; lemon juice stinks of rank heresy.
Some people like to boil or broil their green fruit before doing all this; I like the tart, untamed flavor of the raw tomatillo myself, even if that's Not Really How It's Done. This can be cooked and canned when you're done; otherwise, eat it within two weeks (though it probably won't last that long). When I've got it, I put it on pretty much everything, or make something up just to go with my new condiment.

[ 11. October 2009, 02:37: Message edited by: AristonAstuanax ]

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Carex
Shipmate
# 9643

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That sounds good - I've still got several bags of the green peppers I picked previously that I can use. May need to increase the garlic, peppers and cilantro, though.

We often cover chicken with a layer of green salsa before baking it.

I think I'm limited by the size of my blender and how much I can eat in two weeks. Not sure how well it would go on muesli for breakfast...

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Keren-Heppuch, you've got a slow cooker? Red cabbage works in there, comes out soft and you can freeze the excess for another day. Nice to eat with Glamorgan sausages if you're vegetarian.

The other thing that I like with red cabbage is treating it like white cabbage in coleslaw, but making up the salad with onion and blue cheese dressing.

yes we've got a slow cooker - so, the same basic idea as braising it in the oven but with less liquid?

The salad idea sounds nice but probably one for when no-longer breastfeeding!

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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I've enjoyed using red cabbage in stir-fry -- just slicing it very thinly and adding it to regular stir-fry veg. (DP can't eat cabbage, so we haven't done this for a long time.)

We had homemade pizza yesterday, baked on a pizza stone for the first time -- we got the stone on major close-out sale awhile ago but haven't used it until now. I made the dough in our bread machine. One logistical problem: We don't have a paddle for transferring the pizza to the hot stone, so I had to improvise with parchment paper and a cutting board; worked out fairly well for a medium-size pizza, but there was potential for disaster, what with the floppy unbaked pie.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged



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