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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Recipe thread - another delicious helping
Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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Mrs Sioni's Christmas Pudding

Don't be put off by long list of ingredients - this is really easy!

8oz/227g self raising flour
4oz/113g fresh breadcrumbs
4oz/113g ground almonds
1lb 4oz/565g muscavado sugar
6oz/170g shredded suet
1lb/455g currants
8oz/225g sultanas
8oz/225g raisins
4oz/113g ready to eat dried apricots, chopped
8oz/225g glace cherries halved
smallish carrot, grated
dessert apple - something like Braeburn or Cox, peeled and grated - if very small use 2
8oz/225g ready to eat dried prunes, chopped.
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground nutmeg
2 tsp ground mixed spice

6 med eggs
zest and juice of 1 large orange
zest and juice of 1 lemon
6 tblsp brandy
1/2 pt brown ale (Guinness or Mackesons pref)

Place all dry ingredients in large mixing bowl and mix thoroughly.
Beat eggs in a separate bowl adding brandy, ale and zest and juices.
Stir into dry ingredients mixing well. (family tradition suggests that every family member should have a stir and make a wish - this is really the cooks ploy to aid thorough mixing without having to all the work herself!)
THIS MIXTURE CAN APPEAR TO BE VERY SLOPPY - DON'T PANIC - IT'S MEANT TO BE!

Place mixture into greased heatproof pudding basins - butter is preferable for greasing as it releases better and gives a nice glossy finish. I tend to make a variety of sizes but as a guide this quantity should make 3 x 1 1/2pt puddings
Cover with greased greaseproof paper with a pleat in and then with pleated foil.
Place in steamer and steam for 6-8 hours remembering to top up water regularly
when cool remove from basin, wrap in a double layer of grease proof paper and then foil and store in a cool cupboard.
No need to freeze or refrigerate.
To reheat replace in greased bowl and steam for further 3 hours
Serve with preferred sauce, custard or whatever! Yummy cold as well!

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Thurible
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Thank you!

We've got a vegetarian guest coming for lunch on Sunday. Now, because I like them, I've decided that we will forego proper roast potatoes and cook them in oil rather than lard.

Do they work, though? Does the oil get hot enough? How much should I use?

Thurible

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"I've been baptised not lobotomised."

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by Thurible:
Thank you!

We've got a vegetarian guest coming for lunch on Sunday. Now, because I like them, I've decided that we will forego proper roast potatoes and cook them in oil rather than lard.

Do they work, though? Does the oil get hot enough? How much should I use?

Thurible

Roast spuds without lard? Here goes.

1 Parboil potatoes for c 10 minutes.
2 Roughen the parboiled spuds in a colander.
3 Spray roasting tin with FryLight, a Sunflower Oil/Soya emulsion spray,
4 Put spuds in tin, spray them, put towards top of over at Gas Mark 4/5 (depending on how well your oven door fits).
5 After about 25 minutes, turn them and leave for about 20 minutes.
6 Serve and preen self gently.

Not only without lard but the lowest-fat roasties you can make. Don't make the chunks of potato too big and you can make potato wedges in much the same way.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Huia
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# 3473

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:

2 Roughen the parboiled spuds in a colander.


Sounds good Sioni, could you please explain what you mean by this?

thanks

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Anna B
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I've been asked to post this recipe for the rum-hazelnut-chocolate balls I make at this time of year for consumption at Christmas. A food processor is needed.

Rum Balls

1 box Nilla wafers
12 oz. dark chocolate chips (I prefer Ghirardelli)
2 c. lightly toasted hazelnuts, skins rubbed off in a towel as much as possible
Rum---I use Bacardi Select
Hazelnut syrup such as is used in American coffeehouses for flavoring drinks. Torani is a good brand.

Mix the first 3 ingredients in a large bowl and have another large bowl handy. Process in food processor in batches, then mix by hand. Add enough rum and hazelnut syrup to moisten so that the mixture holds together. Roll into balls. These should be stored for at least a week or two in a cool place, preferably longer, so that their flavor has a chance to develop. I like to store them in glass jars with a rum-soaked piece of paper towel inserted under the lid.

Makes about 2 dozen

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Bad Christian (TM)

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PrettyFly

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Sounds fabulous, thank you so much for posting!!

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Screw today. I'm going for ice cream.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Thurible:
I've decided that we will forego proper roast potatoes and cook them in oil rather than lard.

All my roasties are veggie by your definition. I cut the potatoes into chunks and micowave until done. 5 minutes before I put a tin with a good slosh of sunflower oil into a hot oven. Drain the potatoes, and tip into the now smoking tray of oil, toss briefly, and return to the oven for 20 to 30 mins (or until the potatoes are nicely browned and crisping).
Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Thurible
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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:

2 Roughen the parboiled spuds in a colander.


Sounds good Sioni, could you please explain what you mean by this?
Give them a shake, I'd imagine - i.e., a quick bash from side to side to fluff them up.

Thanks for the stories of veggie-roasting: it seems it can be done and done convincingly, as it were.

Thurible

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"I've been baptised not lobotomised."

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
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On the Christmas food thread comet said that green tomatoes are plentiful in Alaska right now. Here are two recipes.

GREEN TOMATO MNCEMEAT

1 gallon green tomatoes, ground
5 pounds sugar
1 pint cider vinegar
1 gallon diced apples
1 lb. suet
2 lb. raisins
1 Tblsp. cinnamon
1 Tblsp. nutmeg
1 teasp. cloves

Combine all ingredients and bring to a boil over low heat. Boil until the apples are tender, stirring frequently.
Put in hot jars and process in a boiling water bath or freeze.


This recipe is an old one, which does not give precise quantities for ingredients.
SWEET GREEN TOMATO PICKLES

Green tomatoes
Vinegar

Syrup
6 c. sugar
Mace (not ground)
Peppercorns (a few)
4 c. cider vinegar
2 Tblsp. cinnamon (not ground)

Cut tomatoes into chunks. Soak in salt water overnight. Drain thoroughly. Make a solution of one part vinegar to two parts water. Cook tomato chunks a few at at time until they are just fork-tender. Do not cook until mushy.

Combine syrup ingredients and bring to a boil. Put tomatoes in hot jars and pour syrup over them to cover them. Process in a boiling water bath or store in a cool place.

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Originally posted by cattyish on the Hallowe'en thread in Purg

quote:
I'm still lighting up a turnip though. It has the lovely side-effect of soup.

Originally posted by me on the same thread

quote:
During the next week I'll use up the scoopings from the pumpkin for pumpkin pie, and choc 'n pumpkin brownies.
Hmmm...could there be a clue here as to why Cattyish is svelte and lovely and I'm not??

Anyway, Galloping Granny asked for my choc n pumpkin brownie recipe. It's more of a bother than my usual choc chip brownie recipe, so mostly I'll stick with choc chip.

Chocolate, Pumpkin and Pecan Brownies

Preheat oven to 180
Grease and line baking tin. (Recipe says 8 x 10 inch tin, but I use my roasting tin, which is larger.)


Pumpkin mixture
25 g (1 oz) butter
75g (2 1/2 oz) cream cheese
100g (3 1/2 oz) caster sugar
1 egg
100ml (3 1/2 fl oz) pureed pumpkin
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp ground ginger
75g (2 1/2 oz) plain flour

(beat all together and put to one side)

Chocolate mixture
200g (7oz) unsalted butter
200g (7oz) good dark choc
3 large eggs
300g (10 1/2 oz) granulated sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract
125g (4 1/2 oz) plain flour
Pinch salt (recipe says, but I omit)
100g (3 1/2 oz pecans, roughly chopped)

1. Melt butter and chocolate in a microwave, or in a bowl over a pan of simmering water.
2. In a separate bowl, beat tog the eggs, sugar and vanilla extract.
3. Mix in melted choc/butter mixture
4. Stir in flour, salt and pecans.
5. Pour the choc mix into the baking tray.
6. Drop dollops of the pumpkin mix over the choc and swirl in to make an attractive pattern.
7. Bake for 25 mins.

Recipe says to cool in the tin for 40 mins before cutting - my helpful food tasters had dug in well before that.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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I have just had an epiphany vis-a-vis the quince.

I bought one last week, even though I had no idea what to do with it. And today I thought Could I shoehorn it into a chicken recipe? There is one such which comes top of Google - Mediterranean Chicken with Quince. What I cooked was based on a vague recollection of 3 or 4 versions - but it was brilliant.

You need:

Chicken bits (thighs, drumsticks)
A cinnamon stick
A quince
Onion
Garlic
Tomatoes
Parsley (or possibly mint)

Flour and fry the chicken bits in oil. Remove from pan, and fry the onion and garlic until soft. Toss in the cinnamon stick and quartered tomatoes and chunks of peeled quince. Return the chicken to the pan and add wine (or water) - not too much. Put on the lid, and simmer for 15 or 20 minutes (basically until the chicken is done). The sauce should be suprisingly creamy looking. Cheer up with a pinch of any north African/middle eastern spice mix you have to hand, if the fancy takes you. Add chopped parsley - some version say mint.

Anyways, it was gorgeous. The quince gave it a very subtle tartness, and married wonderfully with the tomato and cinnamon.

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Lothlorien
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# 4927

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quote:
Recipe says to cool in the tin for 40 mins before cutting - my helpful food tasters had dug in well before that.

And why wouldn't they dig in? That sounds yummy. My sons used to wonder when young how I could possibly make a slice with the corner cut out so neatly. Well, I had to taste it before serving, didn't I ? It might have been terrible.

Firenze, that quince idea sounds lovely. Quinces here have gone till next autumn but I love them. Baked slowly for a very long time, sweetened to taste and served with cream is very good. I prefer them cold but hot's good too. Quince paste, quince jam. The aroma of them through the house is wonderful too.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
The aroma of them through the house is wonderful too.

Jane Grigson comments on this as well. Which leads me to the conclusion that my quince wasn't all that ripe. Which means that the success of my dish was probably quite accidental, and with ripe fruit it would have been something quite different.
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Lothlorien
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
The aroma of them through the house is wonderful too.

Jane Grigson comments on this as well. Which leads me to the conclusion that my quince wasn't all that ripe. Which means that the success of my dish was probably quite accidental, and with ripe fruit it would have been something quite different.
They need long, slow cooking at a low temperature either in an oven or on stove top to bring out the aroma. Then colour changes from bland beige to very deep pink.

We rarely have a dessert but make exceptions for a few things. Quince is one of them.

[ 03. November 2009, 21:08: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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My first attempt at marmalade has gone horribly wrong. I've made jam before, and in comparison the marmalade seemed to take a long time to reach setting point. It reached it eventually, and I went to bed happy with my pots of marmalade. In the morning, my marmalade had turned into rubber. The taste is excellent, but it won't spread and is sticky and chewy. (A "jaw-breaker" toffee sort of chewy) Obviously, I'd got the setting point wrong.

Suggestions, please? I've made a marmalade sponge pudding before - if I put small chunks of my tough marmalade through a sponge pudding, will they melt through, or will the chunks go even harder?

I've got 5 lbs of the stuff to use up.

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Roseofsharon
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Since I replaced a broken jam thermometer a few years ago I often suffer from jam that is either too runny or too stiff.
I use either for jam/sponge puddings, in the bottom of the baking dish, or poured over the cooked sponge.
With the stiff jam I put a couple of tablespoons ( or slices [Biased] ) of the jam in a bowl and beat in boiling water until it is the consistency I need.

Or here is an alternative use, which I came across on a site called 'halfbakery':
quote:
Marmalade Slices would look rather like cheese slices, with peelable individual packaging. They are stored in the freezer to save them going sticky, and keep them solid (the fridge is too warm). When you want marmalade on toast, simply unwrap a slice, and place it on your warm toast. The slice melts on the warm bread within seconds, and possibly even cools down toast that is too hot to eat.

Perhaps each slice could even have a layer of butter frozen on the bottom...instant toast!

[Big Grin]

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Thurible
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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
My first attempt at marmalade has gone horribly wrong.

Your marmalade sounds a lot like my first attempt at jam - the remnants of which we're still dealing with. I shall follow the advice keenly.

Thurible

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"I've been baptised not lobotomised."

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Gee D
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# 13815

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Firenze, the scent of quinces cooking in the slow cooker is beyond compare. Make sure that before washing them, you thoroughly rub all the down from the skin. Once wet, it's near impossible to remove. In the morning, place in slow cooker with some clear apple juice, a stick of cinnamon, a clove or 2, and a good dollop of honey. Then sit down with a good cup of tea and something to read while you enjoy the aroma. Serve at dinner with thick King Island honey and cinnamon yoghurt, and pour some of the cooking liquor over the top. Your guests will have walked into a well-scented house and looked forward to the course.

Quinces may well have been the golden apples of the Hesperides. They are far more of the Mediterrean than apples are. As Lothlorien says, the colour changes from the yellow to a marvellous deep pink/red as they cook.

Leave a couple in a bowl on the kitchen bench for a few days, and the scent will continue. They seem to keep well after picking.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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I made a pudding tonight, using my usual jam sponge recipe, but with the marmalade. I bent a teaspoon prising the stuff out of its jar, but I bent it back, and you'd hardly notice.

I followed RoseofSharon's suggestion of beating in boiling water - I used the excess marmaladey water in place of milk in my recipe.

The pudding was lovely. Good flavour and the marmalade didn't go hard. I'll definitely be able to use up some of the marmalade making puddings.

Any other suggestions?

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Make sure that before washing them, you thoroughly rub all the down from the skin.

My quince was completely bald like this one.

I will see if our local Asian grocer has them again this week - though I am afraid my current life can't quite support the tea and reading to the scent of cooking quince idyll just yet.

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Gee D
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Firenze, I assume that you were referring to the well known poem The Idylls of the Coing . The cookery I was referring to happens on a winter Saturday if we have guests for dinner that evening.

I'd still be giving the fruit a good polish with a paper towel. The down is very fine, and a light brownish grey. It often gathers in folds in the fruit so may not be easily seen. You can always peel the fruit first, but peeing is a lot easier after cooking, as is cutting out the core.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
...but peeing is a lot easier after cooking, as is cutting out the core.

I didn't know they are a diuretic [Biased]

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Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Gee D
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The difference just one letter can make. I can only plead ad misericordiam.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Firenze, I assume that you were referring to the well known poem The Idylls of the Coing .

Très amusant.

Hopefully, in a few weeks time, my life will be like that. Every morning I will put the bread dough to prove, the cassoulet to simmer, the jam to set, the herbs to dry, the quinces to stew, the curds to drain, the sloe gin to mature. Or I may just slope around in my dressing gown, playing Plants vs Zombies and posting on The Ship.

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daisydaisy
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# 12167

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quote:
Originally posted by Thurible:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
My first attempt at marmalade has gone horribly wrong.

Your marmalade sounds a lot like my first attempt at jam - the remnants of which we're still dealing with. I shall follow the advice keenly.

Thurible

Your marmalade sounds like all my attempts at jam or jelly - sometimes I can't even get a knife in [Hot and Hormonal]
But I keep trying... practice makes perfect (os so they say)

Regarding Quinces - the windfalls that I collected had smooth but tough skin. Maybe different varieties have fur?
And by strange connection to marmalade.... according to my cook book medieval cooks called Quince preserve "marmalade".

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sweetheart
Apprentice
# 14272

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A slightly-stiff marmalade can simply be returned to the pan, heat it up and add water until it's slightly looser than you want it. Re-sterilise your jars, and pour it back in.

Alternatively, if you're planning on making another batch, just pour the stiff marmalade into the new batch to help it on it's way.

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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So I happen to like puh-erh (it's a sort of Strangely Fermented Tea, for those who don't drink such things) and I go out to my Friendly Local Tea Shop and get some. I get home and find out after drinking my first pot that what I got was the Chrysanthemum flavored puh-erh--which is altogether too floral for my tastes. Thus, like all liquids I don't like to drink, I'm looking for a way to cook this stuff away.
I've heard tale of recipes for cakes and cookies using tea, but, needless to say, googling "tea cookie" and "tea cake" probably won't get me what I want. Any suggestions to help me get rid of this not-that-bad-but-I-don't-like-it-personally stuff?

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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Tea ice cream?

There's a recipe here for green tea ice cream. You could try it with your chrysanthemum tea.

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Eloise
Shipmate
# 4292

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Something like this recipe could be adaptable, but it doesn't exactly use much of the stuff. Personally, I think I would be buying a pretty tea tin and re-gifting.

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Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. - The Red Queen

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Piglet
Islander
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quote:
Originally posted by AristonAstuanax:
So I happen to like puh-erh ...

I'm sorry, AA, but I tried saying that out loud and decided it was what you say when you've just drunk or eaten something you really didn't like ... [Snigger]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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We take good but un-personally-wanted tea to church and leave it out for people to take if they wish.

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Posts: 20059 | From: off in left field somewhere | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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I can't find the recipe, but I've made Earl Grey sorbet before.
Posts: 6414 | From: North East Scotland | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
beachpsalms
Shipmate
# 4979

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This recipe for Earl Grey ice cream is almost the same as the one I've got in my ice cream recipe book.

I also found a tea bread

And from one of my favorite bread books:

Earl Grey Tea Rolls

1 tbsp Earl Grey tea
1 cup boiling water
1 tbsp active dry yeast
2 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp melted butter
1 tsp coarse salt or 1/2 tsp table salt
grated rind of 2 limes
3--3 1/4 cups white flour
soft butter

makes about 30 small rolls


Put the tea in a warm pot and pour the boiling water over it. Let steep, covered, for 15 minutes, then strain and cool.
Put the yeast and sugar in a medium-size bowl and pour the lukewarm tea over them. When dissolved, stir in enough of the flour until it becomes hard to stir.
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and let rest while you clean and butter the bowl. Knead the dough, adding more flour as necessary, until it is smooth and resilient - about -7 minutes. Return it to the bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise until double in volume.
Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and punch own. Tear off pieces of dough the size of ping-pong balls and form into small rolls. Place 1 1/2 inches apart, on a buttered baking sheet, cover lightly with a towel, and let rise for about 25 minutes.
Bake the rolls in a preheated 375 F oven for 15 minutes. Remove and brush with soft butter. Serve warm.

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Posts: 826 | From: a hamster's cheek-pouch full of raisins | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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Georgiaboy wanted the Christmas Chutney recipe. It's one of Nigella Lawson's and here's a link

Chili Jelly

150 g red peppers
150 g red chillies
600 ml cider vinegar
1 kg jam sugar

Pour sugar, cider vinegar into a pan, heat gently without stirring while sugar dissolves.

Deseed chillies and peppers. Whizz these in a food processor until very finely chopped. Add to vinegar/sugar mix. Do not stir.

Bring to the boil, simmer rapidly for 10-15 minutes or until setting point is reached.

Remove from heat, stand for 10 minutes, spoon into sterilised jars.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

Posts: 24276 | From: Newport, Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Does jam sugar fulfil the same purpose as ordinary sugar and gelatine? Here's the recipe I use for red pepper jelly - I'm not a huge fan of heat, so I don't put chillies in it, but you could use smaller bell peppers and add chillies if you like it hot.

2 cups chopped red bell peppers (approx. 2 large peppers)
1 cup white vinegar
4½ cups sugar
1 envelope Certo liquid pectin

Sterilise 5 1-cup jars in a 100°C oven for 10-15 minutes.

Puree the chopped peppers with the vinegar. In a large pot, mix the pureed mixture and sugar, stirring well.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat and continue to boil for ten minutes, stirring often.

Remove from the heat, add the pectin, and stir again.

Return to the heat, bring to a rapid rolling boil and boil for one minute, stirring constantly.

Remove from the heat, fill sterilised jars and cover with heated lids. Serve spread on Philly cheese as a dip with crackers, or as an accompaniment to roast lamb, turkey or baked ham.

"Cup" here means an American cup measure - I think it's about 8 fl. oz.

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Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Does jam sugar fulfil the same purpose as ordinary sugar and gelatine?

Here's the low down on jam sugar, at least as it is known in the UK. It is the pectin that causes things to set, although the chili jelly is a little temperamental and needs to be given time to set.

I don't know anything about using gelatine in this sort of jelly.

Thanks for the Red Pepper Jelly recipe.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

Posts: 24276 | From: Newport, Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Thanks for the link, Sioni. My mum was a prolific jam and marmalade maker, but I don't remember anything about gelatine, so I suppose she must have used jam sugar.

I saw a really nice recipe on Everyday Food for chicken breasts roasted with potatoes, and adapted it for a couple of duck breasts I had in the freezer:

Duck Breasts with Potatoes and Red Peppers

2 boneless duck breasts
2 large potatoes, cut into about 2-inch bits
1 large red bell pepper, de-seeded and chopped in 2-inch bits
A drizzle of olive oil
The leaves from a few sprigs of thyme (or a pinch of dried thyme)
A little grated lemon zest and a sprinkling of lemon juice
Salt and pepper

Pre-heat the oven to 450°F

Make a few scores in the fat on the duck breasts with a sharp knife and season with salt and pepper.

Put the chopped potatoes and peppers on a baking tray and add the olive oil, thyme, lemon zest and juice and salt and pepper. Mix it all together with your hands and set the duck breasts on the top, fat side down.

Roast for about 30-40 minutes, taking it out half-way through to turn everything over.

This timing will cook the meat right through, but you need it to cook the potatoes fully. If you prefer your duck a bit rarer, put the veggies in first and add the duck after, say, 10-15 minutes.

This left a lot of oily juices in the pan; you could make a sauce with them with some wine, stock or lemon juice, although I didn't and it was still rather good.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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Any decent North American cookbook with a section on jellies should provide information about how much pectin (easily available in the autumn in most supermarkets) to add to the fruit/juice and the sugar. No gelatine is involved. My mother used to use crab apple juice -- extremely high in natural pectin -- to help other, less "pectiny" joices set.

"Jam sugar" seems to me to be just a way to get the necessary pectin into the joice to make it set. My issue would be that, as different fruits (indeed, the same fruits grown in different places or harvested at different stages of ripeness) need different amounts of pectin to set, using a pre-mixed "jam sugar" might leave some jellies still quite runny, and others requiring a hacksaw.

John

Posts: 5929 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
Any decent North American cookbook with a section on jellies . . .

Well, wouldn't you know it, I happen to have a DNAC handy by my desk (making a Bishop's [++'s?] Bread--which makes me wonder, are there "breads" for other prelates as well?).
According to They Joy of Cooking, you need 6 tablespoons of liquid pectin for a 1.5 pint recipe of pepper jelly.
So There.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

Posts: 6849 | From: The People's Republic of Balcones | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
To The Pain
Shipmate
# 12235

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Georgiaboy wanted the Christmas Chutney recipe. It's one of Nigella Lawson's and here's a link

Chili Jelly

<snip>

This weekend I made Delia's Christmas Chutney and it worked a treat - I'm very glad that I had nearly a jar's worth extra and can happily consume it until Christmas myself!

Sioni, do you have any suggestions for using the Chilli Jelly you posted? I'd like to try it and I think people might appreciate directions for something like that - what does it go really well with?

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Leaf
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# 14169

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To The Pain: My all-time favourite topping for a cracker (Carr's Water or similar) is good blue cheese topped with a dollop of red pepper jelly. Camembert or Brie will also do as red pepper jelly support. It's very heaven - the creaminess of the cheese contrasting with the slight bite of the pepper jelly, saltiness and sweetness together.

Unlike the industrious Sioni, however, I purchase red pepper jelly instead of making my own.

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pimple

Ship's Irruption
# 10635

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Regarding jams and marmalade, there are really no better alternatives to a deep pot and a thermometer you can clip on the side.

One without the other is no good. I recently bought a good thermometer but as I was only making a few jars of marmalade I used an ordinary saucepan.

Result was the thermometer wouldn't go deep enough into the mix and I got a false reading.

But some delicious orange toffee! BTW I always add cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger in roughly equal quantities - boiled up with the pulp before the rinds go in. Heaven!

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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We weren't hungry enough for a real meal tonight, so we took the suggestion to top bleu cheese with pepper jelly on crackers. Yum! Wonderful stuff.

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http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Going back to the chilli jelly - I am going to look for pectin in the professional bakery supply place in the city next week but if it is not available can I use a fair quantity of lemon juice, do you think?

It seems to me that this might add a pleasantly tart flavour to it. We would probably leave the chilli seeds in as well, but then we LIKE heat.

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Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

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Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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I doubt that more lemon juice would help. Citrus juice draws more pectin from whatever fruit you are using, but if there's very little there to start with you still won't get a decent set. Citrus peel contains pectin, but may impact too much on the flavour.
Don't know what fruits you have available over there, but pectin can be extracted from underripe members of the apple family, and some other tart fruits.

...Tamarind - I'm sure you can get tamarind! I think that is fairly high in pectin, so you could use boiled & strained tamarind juice.

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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A quick Google shows that you are right about tamarind.

So I expect chili jelly with my Tuesday toast, Wodders!

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
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Welease Woderrick

Do they have in Jam Sugar of you could try making chilli and guava jam (apparently guavas are high in pectin). There are other substitutes

Jengie

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Piglet
Islander
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WW, I use a brand of liquid pectin called Certo that you can get in supermarkets here - if you can't get it, perhaps A Certain Host might slip a box or two into his suitcase when he visits ... [Big Grin]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Tamarind is easy-peasy! We grow a local variety and can easily buy the paste, which is presumably already cooked. The mere idea of a combination of tamarind red capsicum and red chilli has me salivating all over my keyboard!

I am fairly sure we can get agar-agar as well.

Yum yum.

I may try this before you come, Pete, if not we can experiment one Tuesday morning when we have the kitchen to ourselves. If it doesn't work we'll have to make do with plain old Indonesian Sambal - I'm sure that the pepper and chilli jelly is a sort of [toned down?] version of Sambal.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Sorry for the double post but I have just spent a happy few minutes looking through some Sambal recipes on this site.

My taste buds are tingling!

This is the one that appeals the most at the moment but tomorrow it might be another. This recipe is so simple I just have to give it a go - preferably tomorrow with lunch!

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged



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