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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Recipe thread - another delicious helping
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Part of her success is that her recipes are almost completely foolproof.

But boring. In fact, her whole persona is boring. I will watch any programme where someone is chopping a carrot, or sauteing an onion - but hers make me want to go find some wet paint.
Now someone from over there has said this, I can agree. Her TV programmes ran down here some years ago. I watched part of one and turned it off. Totally boring.

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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[tangent] Is there a post landmark thread for threads? [Biased] Lothlorien's post was number 1,700 on this recipe thread.[/tangent]

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
I asked this question elsewhere and was directed to this page of kohlrabi recipes

Tonight I made Braised Kohlrabi with Garlic and Parmesan from that site - another recipe I will add to the repertoire.
Again I used this years kohl rabi.
6lb of the 2003 harvest went for the kitchen waste collection this morning, along with 53lb of the plum family (plums, damsons & bullace) from 2006.

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rugasaw
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I tried something several times the past month and it has turned out tasty enough to share.

Grape Dumplings(Don't raise that eyebrow at me)

2cps self raising flour
1Tbl shortening(or butter)
1cp of grape juice(or enough to make a dough)
Combine and let rest.
Boil grape juice and drop tsp sized dough into the juice. Boil for 10 minutes. Serve.

Left over grape juice from the boil makes a nice sauce for ice cream or pancakes. There has been no left over dumplings.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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Ariel
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# 58

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I've been given two decent-sized beetroots. Any suggestions for how to use them? I don't want to make borscht, or pickle them. Other ideas are welcome: a curry (with coconut milk and lime juice) is looking the most likely option at present.
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QLib

Bad Example
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Grated beetroot, with likewise grated carrot and apple, dressed fairly simply (lemon juice, maybe, or cider vinegar) makes a great salad - good with smoked mackerel and horseradish.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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In my childhood, there were always (in season) a couple of plain boiled beetroot knocking about. Slices make an excellent sandwich filling (with or without tomato) on white bread, with a little salt.
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Curiosity killed ...

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Chop the beetroot into wedges and roast with onion wedges and enough olive oil not to stick, when cooked throw on some balsamic vinegar, walnuts and goats cheese. Serve with salad leaves.

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
Grated beetroot, with likewise grated carrot and apple, dressed fairly simply (lemon juice, maybe, or cider vinegar) makes a great salad - good with smoked mackerel and horseradish.

Toasted sesame, pumpkin and sunflower seeds are good in this too.

We usually do salad or soup with beetroot, depending on the weather, or else just add it to curries, stews, stir fries etc while accepting that they will end up pink!

That reminds me - curried beetroot soup makes a change from borscht. I do a simplified version of this one: Spicy beetroot and coconut soup.

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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Oven-roasted beetroot is a very tasty and non-labor-intensive way to cook them -- butter or olive-oil the cleaned root, then wrap in foil (I wonder if parchment paper works as well?) and bake it with a roast or other long-cooking oven item. Baking seems to accentuate the sweetness. If the beets are small they can also be peeled/halved and roasted with a roast, although of course the color will run into anything else in the roaster.

The Russians, I hear, are also fond of adding cooked beetroot to creamy dilly potato salad, along with chopped cucumber -- last-moment add-ins. Those are all flavors I love, so I might try that if/when my own beet crop matures.

And -- maybe a reader from Oz can respond here -- aren't beets a component of hamburgers down under...or just beet relish?

Dinner at our house tonight: We bought pork steak -- the po' food of my frugal childhood -- rubbed it with tamari and a ginger teriaki rub from a local spice retailer, then grilled it over lump charcoal and soaked maple chips. (Not sure how that translates across the pond...the lump charcoal is natural, non-chemically tinkered-with, non-briquet chunks of charcoaled wood. And around here we can be bags of wood chips specifically for smoking/cooking...to be soaked in water or other liquid of one's choice, then added to a grill right before the food goes on. The aromatic smoke from the wet chips permeates the food in all sorts of tasty ways. I myself prefer maple, usually, but one can purchase fruitwood chips of various species, beechwood, hickory, mesquite, alder, cedar...all with a somewhat different flavor and culinary purpose.)

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rugasaw
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# 7315

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Lump charcoal and wood chips mean the same thing over hear. I prefer pecan and oak.

I cooked a pork chops the other day wished for a crunchy outside. I discovered belatedly that I was out of corn meal. I used crushed french fried onions for the breading. Turned out delicious but I had to be careful not to burn it.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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Ariel
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# 58

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Thanks, all for the suggestions! I think I have enough beetroot to try out QLib's salad idea, and make a small curry with the other one. I'll be trying out the soup and roasting when I get some more as I don't really have enough at the moment to do much. (I remember the beetroot sandwiches from my childhood too.)

As for the leaves, I stuffed some of them (spiced rice, chopped tomato and fresh herbs) and cooked them on a layer of sliced tomatoes with garlic, in a tomato and lemon sauce. I normally do this with spinach leaves, but it worked well on beetroot leaves.

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Lothlorien
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quote:
And -- maybe a reader from Oz can respond here -- aren't beets a component of hamburgers down under...or just beet relish?
Absolutely. Every burger worth the name has to have beetroot.

Beet relish? Not much of that available here unless homemade. I did see some sort of beetroot relish commercially but that's many years ago.

I like beets roasted, pickled, grated, raw, boiled.

Beetroot for burger is practically always tinned beetroot which is sort of pickled. Not my homestyle pickles but sliced, tinned with some vinegar and sugar. It makes the burger or steak sandwich and is an essential part of an authentic burger..

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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My mother would can beets both au natural and pickled, but oftentimes she'd do a quick pickling of plain beets -- she'd pour the canned beets into a pan, add some sliced onion, cider vinegar and sugar to taste and then add a couple good teaspoons of mixed pickling spice. I always loved those. Now that I'm thinking about it, they would indeed taste great on a burger.

Over here beets -- either plain or pickled -- are often added to Greek salad...romaine or spinach leaves, red onion, feta and cucumber with an oregano-and-garlic-spiced olive oil/wine vinegar dressing, and perhaps a couple of pepperocinis on the side. I suspect this is about as Greek as our version of Greek pizza (topped with spinach, feta and kalamata olives), but it does taste good.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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For a South Indian variation try Beetroot Thoran - the "h" is almost silent.

Cook your beets in a pressure cooker or however you like to cook them then peel them and dice them about 1/4 inch size.

Heat a wok or similar sort of pan, medium heat, add a spoonful or so of oil and when the oil is hot add a sprinkling of black mustard seed and allow them to pop. By this time the oil will probably be smoking but don't panic.

Add diced beets and stir about a bit then add a spoonful or so of freshly grated coconut [or moistened unsweetened dessicated coconut]. Stir about a bit more then serve as a side vegetable with anything really.

If you want to heat it up a bit add a teaspoon of freshly grated black pepper along with the coconut.

Simple and delicious.

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Eloise
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# 4292

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There is also this Beetroot Risotto (with vodka!) from The Cranks' Bible - somewhat alarmingly coloured, but tastes pretty good.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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At lunch today I was presented with a side dish of Beetroot & Cabbage Thoran!

Recipe pretty much as above adding the shredded cabbage after the mustard seeds have popped, fry gently for a few minutes before adding the beetroot.

If you like both brassicae and beetroot, you will love this one!

[ 11. July 2010, 13:24: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]

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Fancy a break in South India?
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What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Ariel
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# 58

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Hmmm... inspired by the internet and the purchase of some red onions, I'm now thinking beetroot, caramelized onion and goat's cheese tart.

I never knew beetroot could be so versatile. It's quite an under-used vegetable.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Hmmm... inspired by the internet and the purchase of some red onions, I'm now thinking beetroot, caramelized onion and goat's cheese tart...

Gosh but that sounds lovely - beetroot always goes so well with cheese. Can you post the recipe afterwards, please?

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Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Ariel
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Certainly. I based it on this and adapted freely as I went along, starting with a pre-made full-size savoury pastry case rather than individual tartlets. For the onions I used red onions, cider vinegar and ordinary sugar, red wine and thyme, seasoning to taste.

Hint: you need firm goat's cheese for slicing: mine disintegrated while trying to cut it, but as it's only going to be melted that doesn't matter too much. I served it with a side salad that included the beetroot leaves. This is surprisingly easy to make, and good to eat.

I also have a gooseberry frangipani for afters. It's been a good day. [Big Grin]

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Ariel
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Btw I didn't bother bruleeing it at the end. I wouldn't have thought it necessary.
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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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Thanks Ariel.

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What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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kingsfold

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OK. Okra.
I saw some frozen okra in a supermarket the other day and couldn't resist buying it as I do like bhindi bhaji.

So, being moderately crap at making up recipes/guessing what spices to add to stuff... Any suggestions as to what to do with my okra? I don't really want to flour and fry it.

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Leetle Masha

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# 8209

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Hi Kingsfold,

The recipe for bindi-bhaji from the BBC seems to use similar spices to many Indian recipes: cumin, coriander, chili powder, turmeric....

I love fried okra, where the okra, well drained and almost dry to the touch, can be dipped in egg, rolled in either corn meal or cracker meal, and fried in a vegetable oil such as sunflower or canola. Then, the spices could go into a sauce for the fried okra. If you make your own cracker meal by pulverising saltine-crackers, I think you could take the salt-cellar right off the table! [Smile]

[speling]

[ 12. July 2010, 13:38: Message edited by: Leetle Masha ]

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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There are so many things you can do with okra but some of them rather overpower the rather delicate flavour. To serve as a side dish just wash it and drain and cut into half inch lengths.

Same as the thoran above put some oil in a pan, coconut oil gives the best flavour but possibly use another, bland oil and then add a teaspoon of coconut oil just before you take it off the heat.

Add mustard seeds to the oil, let them pop then add the okra and stir whilst it fries, not too fast as you want it cooked but not over-cooked.

When cooked add the teaspoon of coconut oil and some freshly grated black pepper.

Serve.

As a variation add some finely chopped fresh ginger to the oil a minute or two before adding the okra - not too much, just to give it a little mild gingery heat.

My personal preference would be to keep okra away from onion or garlic [is it really me saying no garlic?] and keep the flavour on its own.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
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quote:
Originally posted by Leetle Masha:
. . . fried in a vegetable oil such as sunflower or canola . . .

I guess that'll work in a pinch, but, as any good Okie popcorn addict can tell you, bacon drippings must be used if you want to do it right. Dredge the okra pieces in salt and peppered flour, fry them until dark brown (almost burnt in some cases) in bacon grease, then put on paper towels. Hope that some remain long enough for dinnertime.

If you're looking for things to do with okra besides frying or pickling, however, I'd recommend trying a Lebanese lamb stew, yak'nit bahmeh, which is simply divine.

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Graven Image
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I have a plum tree that has gone crazy this year, I had two branches break off before I could unload them and I have buckets of small plums the size of very large cherries. Any idea how I could make jam with out peeling, and seeding them all given their small size. I can see straining the seeds out after cooking perhaps, but can you use the skins in jam?
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Leetle Masha

Cantankerous Anchoress
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Thanks all, for the suggestions on how to cook okra, I wasn't even the one who initially asked! Truly, grace aboundeth!

I know that there are not many things I actually do these days with okra. Frying it in bacon grease would certainly make it delicious, but that's off my diet for the reason that people in my family have a lot of heart attacks and tend to drop dead at inopportune moments, alas. So I stick with the light stuff.

But I am grateful for the ideas for cooking okra that do not produce a gluey mass, such as when it's just boiled until it's been over cooked. I like the flavour of it too, but not the glue.

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Ariel
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# 58

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I've tended either to put okra in the aforementioned Lebanese stew (which is very good on a cold winter's day) or else to fry it (sliced into small rounds, in a small quantity of oil) until golden, drain it, and add it to a quantity of cold plain yoghurt. This makes a good side dish for a spicy main course.

A more elaborate version calls for black mustard seeds to be fried along with the okra, and for a little grated ginger, chillies and salt to be added into the yoghurt. This works well.

[ 13. July 2010, 19:58: Message edited by: Ariel ]

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
I have buckets of small plums the size of very large cherries.

What about treating them as sloes, and chucking them in a jar with sugar and gin?

Or cooking them, and then sieving to remove the stones and skin and making a sort of plum jelly?

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
I have a plum tree that has gone crazy this year, I had two branches break off before I could unload them and I have buckets of small plums the size of very large cherries. Any idea how I could make jam with out peeling, and seeding them all given their small size. I can see straining the seeds out after cooking perhaps, but can you use the skins in jam?

Slit the fruit and cook it whole, including skin and stones. That way you will get a better flavour and set. Skim out as many stones as you can before you add the sugar. You will probably miss a few, so put a warning on the label that the jam may contain stones.

That is the way I usually make damson and bullace jams. Alternatively I remove the stones first, using a cherry/olive stoner (are your plums that small?), but add them to the pan in a muslin bag while the fruit cooks.
I would never remove the skins.

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
What about treating them as sloes, and chucking them in a jar with sugar and gin?

I've just done that with blackcurrants

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Graven Image
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Thanks all for the suggestions. I will try the split fruit and strain seeds idea. I am afraid I like gin to much to add anything to it but an olive or two. [Devil]
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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Use Vodka instead in that case.

Jengie

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Piglet
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# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
... I like gin to much to add anything to it but an olive or two. [Devil]

I like it too, but damson GIN is a wonderful thing - don't use posh stuff like Bombay Sapphire, just any old bog-standard own-brand will do.

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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Urp (says the vodka woman) [Biased]

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Actually, with plums, a light rum might work as well, if you're feeling adventurous. Otherwise, pure grain alcohol cut to about 100 proof is best.
Yes, I've made far too many liqueurs for my own good. They impress the ladies.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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rugasaw
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# 7315

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quote:
Originally posted by kingsfold:
I don't really want to flour and fry it.

Well there's the problem. You should use corn meal not flour. And with fresh okra you don't need to use any eggs. You just coat them with the corn meal. But if frying is the problem I would pickle them.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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kingsfold

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# 1726

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Thanks for the suggestions folks. The lamb & okra stew sounds wonderful, and I'll definitely try that at some point. And the other offerings sounds good too (I may yet give in & try the frying in cornmeal).
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Graven Image
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# 8755

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I just wanted to report back on the plum jam. TO DIE FOR. YUM
I cooked it and then seeded it, left the skins on added grated lime peel, ginger, and sugar, then cooked it down hard boil for 5 minutes, simmer for 20 more. Then into jars and water bath canner. It is really so good.

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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I think this from the "unexpectedly good food combinations" thread should go here! Sounds yummy!

quote:
Originally posted by Silver Faux:
<snip>
Still a big fan of Stilton cheese on a slice of spiced zuchini bread, though.
Can I post a recipe for it here?

Zucchini Bread
Ingredients
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
3 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon alspice
3 eggs
1 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 cups zucchini, grated
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 cup walnuts, chopped (optional)
1 cup pecans, chopped (optional)
1 cup raisins (optional)

Preheat your oven to 350ºF.

Sift flour, baking soda, salt, baking powder, allspice and cinnamon onto waxed paper.

Combine eggs, oil, sugar, zucchini and vanilla in a large mixing bowl. Beat until well mixed. Add the flour mixture from the waxed paper. Mix until smooth. Add raisins and nuts and mix. Pour mixture into a greased 13x9x2" pan.

Bake at 350ºF for 40 minutes or until the center springs back when lightly touched with your fingertip or toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
Cool in pan on wire rack.

Serve with Stilton blue cheese.



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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:

I cooked it and then seeded it, left the skins on added grated lime peel, ginger, and sugar, then cooked it down hard boil for 5 minutes, simmer for 20 more. Then into jars and water bath canner. It is really so good.

That's a very different method to my usual jam making.
For most jams I cook the fruit until it is soft, add warmed sugar and continue cooking gently until the sugar is completely dissolved. Then bring to a full boil until it reaches setting point.
Pour into hot jars, cover tightly with a screw on lid and invert until cold.

I do like the sound of lime peel and ginger - if only I didn't already have a cupboard full of various varieties of plum jam [Roll Eyes]


I have a non-jam query.
If a recipe lists black pepper amongst its ingredients does it always mean the dried peppercorns such as one normally grinds and uses as a condiment?
I have never come across any other sort of black pepper, but I may have just made a terrible mistake! [Mad]

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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No, you're OK. Black pepper is black pepper. There are green and white and pink peppercorns, but it is all pepper.
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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
No, you're OK. Black pepper is black pepper. There are green and white and pink peppercorns, but it is all pepper.

Well, this is the list of ingredients for the recipe. If it means black pepper as I know it (and you confirm) the quantity seems a bit high.

Old-Fashioned Gooseberry Chutney:
2lb green gooseberries
2lb shallots
A few raisins
1pt vinegar
1lb brown sugar
1 oz crushed black pepper.

If it had called for whole peppercorns in a muslin bag, to be removed at the end of cooking, I might not have worried, but this is crushed pepper (I used coarse ground), cooked into the chutney and 1 oz is a whole jar!

Being a bit cautious I only used a teaspoonful (rounded); 1/4 - 1/3 of the jar. The result is still mighty powerful, and pepper is all that I can taste. I can only hope the flavours mellow in storage!

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Josephine

Orthodox Belle
# 3899

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I like sangria. It's a wonderful drink on a hot summer day.

Sangria
1 orange
1 lemon
4 limes
1/2 cup sugar
1 bottle unpleasantly harsh red wine (preferably a grenache or rioja, but a cabernet can work, too)
1 12oz can 7-Up

Slice the lemon and 2 of the limes into thin slices. Put them in a pitcher with the sugar. Shake vigorously until the fruit is coated with sugar and starting to get juicy. Cover and lput it in the fridge. Put the wine and the 7-Up in the fridge, too.

Two or three hours later, juice the orange and the remaining limes and pour the juice into the pitcher with the fruit. Add the wine and the 7-up.

Serve iced. Garnish with a couple of fresh pitted cherries if they're in season, or a slice of lemon or orange.

A friend of ours suggested putting the sliced fruit that's left after you've drunk all the sangria on a large salmon filet and baking it. I didn't get salmon at the grocery today; I got pork. But I think, once we're done with the sangria, I may use the fruit to bake the pork chops.

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I've written a book! Catherine's Pascha: A celebration of Easter in the Orthodox Church. It's a lovely book for children. Take a look!

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Just two things you forgot about making sangria:
1. The pint of cheap brandy you add to the bowl
2. You have to eat the fruit—it soaks up the juice (and the brandy!)
[Devil]

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Josephine

Orthodox Belle
# 3899

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You know, I've had sangria fortified with brandy or rum or other booze -- I just don't like it as well.

And, yes, I normally eat the fruit. I've got fresh Bing cherries in the bottom of my glass that I'll be eating soon. But the sliced lemons and limes are currently wrapped with the pork in some heavy duty foil and are cooking on the grill. I'm expecting it to be delicious.

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I've written a book! Catherine's Pascha: A celebration of Easter in the Orthodox Church. It's a lovely book for children. Take a look!

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rugasaw
Shipmate
# 7315

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Summer afternoon use sangria such as Josephine posted. Sangria on a summer night yearns for some brandy.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

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Over on the Food Combinations thread, someone mentioned having had a watermelon, tomato and onion salad that was good, but wasn't able to get the recipe. As it happens, yesterday's Boston Globe had a watermelon, radish, and onion salad recipe, so I'm posting here in case it might provide a starting point for experimenting with the tomatoes.

(And no, I haven't tried the recipe.)

Seeing Red Watermelon Salad

Serves 6

8 cups bite-sized cubes seedless watermelon

salt

2-1/2 Tbsp cider vinegar

1 Tbsp honey

Pepper

5 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 medium red onion, very thinly sliced (about 1 cup)

6 large red radishes, thinly sliced (about 1-1/4 cups)

1/2 large head radicchio, thinly sliced (about 1-1/2 cups)

1/2 cup Parmesan shavings, to pass at table

Toss the watermelon gently with 1/4 tsp salt in a colander set over a large bowl; refrigerate until the watermelon exudes about 1/4 cup juice (about 30 minutes). Discard the juice.

Meanwhile, in a large nonreactive bowl, mix the vinegar, honey, 1/2 tsp salt, and pepper to taste. Vigorously whisk in the oil to blend. Taste and adjust salt & pepper in necessary.

Add the onion, toss to coat, and set aside for about 15 minutes.

Add the watermelon, radishes, and radicchio, toss gently to coat and spread the salad evernly on a serving platter.

Serve at once, passing the Parmesan shavings.

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LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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At our house we are trying to manage a bumper crop of leaf lettuce that, thanks to a very rainy and not overly hot summer, will be going on for awhile.

My mother used to make wilted salad with a hot bacon dressing, once in awhile to use up an overage of leaf lettuce...you pour the still-hot dressing over the lettuce and stir it around until the dressing is nicely incorporated...very tasty, but not terribly healthy. Does anyone know of any wilted-salad recipes that don't involve fatty cured meats?

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged



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