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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Same place, new questions
TonyK

Host Emeritus
# 35

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Thanks for the advice about WiFi in Travelodges. It turns out that I won't need to use it, due to the kindness and generosity of my boss who has lent me her USB mobile modem thingy that she is not using now that she has a broadband connection - it works anywhere there is a mobile signal, and it's brilliant.

That's great - but I thought mobile phone internet access was rather expensive...


<edit to replace wrong word - d'oh>

[ 11. February 2009, 22:21: Message edited by: TonyK ]

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Yours aye ... TonyK

Posts: 2717 | From: Gloucestershire | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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That's what I thought too, but she insists it doesn't cost any more to use it, than she is already paying for it anyway. It was a deal with her laptop, that she is buying in installments.

[ 11. February 2009, 22:24: Message edited by: Gracious rebel ]

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Fancy a break beside the sea in Suffolk? Visit my website

Posts: 4413 | From: Suffolk UK | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Surfing Madness
Shipmate
# 11087

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I have mobile broadband USB thingy, It's not that expensive, i pay a set amount a month, and have never gone over my limit (seem to be able to surf as much as i like just not watch too many video's, download to many music files.) Also it is better at picking up signial than a normal mobile. Even worked when my friend took it to the outer hebredies! The only time i can't connect is where there is a weak signial and i'm on the move (on the train, it seems to need a slightly better signial.) If your use to normal broadband it won't be quiet so fast.

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I now blog about all my crafting! http://inspiredbybroadway.blogspot.co.uk

Posts: 1542 | From: searching for the jam | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Spouse

Ship's Pedant
# 3353

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quote:
Originally posted by TonyK:
That's great - but I thought mobile phone internet access was rather expensive..

I pay T-Mobile £8.75 a month for up to 3GB of data transfer. The deal also includes unlimited Wifi access at T-Mobile 'hotspots' and 300 minutes of BT Wifi. That price includes some loyalty discounts but I don't think it's more than about £15 a month nowadays for the full package.

Like all mobile tariffs, it's a bit of a minefield. Some of the others available are enormously expensive but if you do your homework it can be very reasonable.

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Try to have a thought of your own, thinking is so important. - Blackadder

Posts: 1814 | From: Here, there & everywhere | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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Central heating is still a bit of a novelty to us... we were just wondering what people consider a "normal" room temperature to set the thermostat too. I'm quite aware this will vary widely -we'd like it lowish as that will be cheaper but we don't want to freeze either...

Just curious [Big Grin]

Posts: 12719 | From: Enid Blyton territory. | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
lily pad
Shipmate
# 11456

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Is always 18 degrees at my house. I like to be warm.

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Sloppiness is not caring. Fussiness is caring about the wrong things. With thanks to Adeodatus!

Posts: 2468 | From: Truly Canadian | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged
LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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quote:
RooK: More pedantry. Soap is a surfactant. Clumsily described, it works as a two-way grabber - one end bonds strongly to water (ionic), and the other end bonds strongly to anything-but-water (non-ionic). So, the soap grabs onto the molecules of, well, everything you rub it on, and rinsing in water helps rip away anything that isn't strongly bonded together.
I agree, but I always thought that it was also related to surface tension. Soap reduces the surface tension of water, enabling fat to dissolve in it more easily. Or am I wrong?

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

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RooK

1 of 6
# 1852

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quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
I agree, but I always thought that it was also related to surface tension. Soap reduces the surface tension of water, enabling fat to dissolve in it more easily. Or am I wrong?

No, that sounds right. The definition of a surfactant is something that affects surface tension. The binary bonding that is ionic and anionic would be in parallel with the surfactant effect boundary effects.
Posts: 15274 | From: Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
quote:
RooK: More pedantry. Soap is a surfactant. Clumsily described, it works as a two-way grabber - one end bonds strongly to water (ionic), and the other end bonds strongly to anything-but-water (non-ionic). So, the soap grabs onto the molecules of, well, everything you rub it on, and rinsing in water helps rip away anything that isn't strongly bonded together.
I agree, but I always thought that it was also related to surface tension. Soap reduces the surface tension of water, enabling fat to dissolve in it more easily. Or am I wrong?
Fat doesn't dissolve in water, no matter what the surface tension. It requires a surfactant like soap or detergent to enable water to actually remove fat (other than by physical pushing).

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This is the last sig I'll ever write for you...

Posts: 63536 | From: Washington | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
BroJames
Shipmate
# 9636

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I'm wanting to replace a collection of TV, digital TV and recording equipment with a straightforward and reliable digital TV and digital recording facility with hopefully a relatively simple way of playing back legacy VHS video (perhaps retaining the existing machine for that). Ease of use is important as the person for whom this intended has some slight sight impairment. Can anyone advise me?

In my own area we are due to be going digital in the autumn. But I can't try anything out here because until switchover happens we have no digital signal - when it happens we will have no analogue signal.

Posts: 3374 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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As a matter of interest, what is the Open Episcopal Church?

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shameless self promotion - because I think it's worth it
and mayhap this too: http://broken-moments.blogspot.co.nz/

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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I spotted a bird I didn't recognise on our cotoneaster bush today. I can't find it in our bird book.

It was about the size of a starling, but with a longer tail. Like a small, slim thrush. It was a pale grey colour. We have collared doves in the garden sometimes, but this was much smaller and slimmer and didn't have the dark collar.

Any suggestions?

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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A Fieldfare or a female redstart, more unlikely perhaps a immature Black Redstart?

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
The Rogue
Shipmate
# 2275

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quote:
Originally posted by Emma Louise:
Central heating is still a bit of a novelty to us... we were just wondering what people consider a "normal" room temperature to set the thermostat too. I'm quite aware this will vary widely -we'd like it lowish as that will be cheaper but we don't want to freeze either...

Just curious [Big Grin]

If I told you what number I used and you put that one into your system you wouldn't necessarily have the same temperature in your house.

The location of the sensor makes a difference. If you put it in a place which is in a cold draft it will tell the boiler to work harder than the same sensor in a sheltered spot.

You need to experiment. Put any number in and wait an hour or see and decide if you want it hotter or colder. It could take several days to find an ideal.

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If everyone starts thinking outside the box does outside the box come back inside?

Posts: 2507 | From: Toton | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Rogue
Shipmate
# 2275

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My question relates to my journey to work. I cycle through Attenborough Nature Reserve which is some old quarries next to the River Trent which were allowed to flood and then wait and see what wildlife turns up.

It occurred to me the other day that in cold weather the (very deep) lakes are quite often frozen over but the river never is. Why does running water not freeze? I dare say that if it were cold enough the river would but why, at common temperatures, doesn't it?

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If everyone starts thinking outside the box does outside the box come back inside?

Posts: 2507 | From: Toton | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Thanks, Jengie. That's a really helpful site. I was just blundering about, googling.

It was too big to be a black redstart, and it's the wrong time of year, and wrong area for a redstart.

The fieldfare is closest, but I don't think it was a fieldfare. It was more of a uniform pale grey. I originally thought it might be an immature collared dove, because it was the right colour, but smaller, sleeker and skinnier, and it didn't have the distinctive collar. However, even immature collared doves should have the collar.

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Spike

Mostly Harmless
# 36

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quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
As a matter of interest, what is the Open Episcopal Church?

I think J Whitgift adequately answered that question in this post in Purgatory [Big Grin]

dj_ordinaire summed them up quite well too about 2 posts later.

[ 14. February 2009, 17:36: Message edited by: Spike ]

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"May you get to heaven before the devil knows you're dead" - Irish blessing

Posts: 12860 | From: The Valley of Crocuses | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Taliesin
Shipmate
# 14017

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Originally posted by Emma Louise:
_________________________________________________
Central heating is still a bit of a novelty to us... we were just wondering what people consider a "normal" room temperature to set the thermostat too. I'm quite aware this will vary widely -we'd like it lowish as that will be cheaper but we don't want to freeze either...

Just curious _________________________________________________

Usually, each room's radiator has its own thermostat, so the temperature you set the main thermostat to will regualte when the boiler goes on, but not necessarily what each room temp will be. We put our thermostat in the hall (it's a remote one, we can put it anywhere, inculding in the fridge (we were experimenting, ok??) so now it's balanced on the kitchen skylight windowledge. We set it at 19 degrees c, but occasionally put it further down, if it feels hot. My daughters' rooms, at the top of the house, with super duper insulation, are like saunas, despite having their radiators on a reasonable number. (most of the time) while the dining room at the back of the house - wooden floors with holes in - is distinctly chilly. As is my bedroom. The front room was pretty cold till we installed a bigger radiator - it wasn't the right size for the room.

any help?

[ 14. February 2009, 19:15: Message edited by: Harperchild ]

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RooK

1 of 6
# 1852

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quote:
Originally posted by The Rogue:
Why does running water not freeze? I dare say that if it were cold enough the river would but why, at common temperatures, doesn't it?

Phase change involves a transition of energy, and temperature is just one facet of the state situation along with pressure. The work done to/by the water as it runs may be sufficient to buffer the energy transfer from the water to prevent it from accomplishing becoming solid. However, given sufficient temperature gradient, this mild energy buffer is overcome and running water can freeze too.
Posts: 15274 | From: Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Here is a picture of a frozen waterfall.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Izzybee
Shipmate
# 10931

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Does anyone know of a website of the American veriety that gives advice on refinancing mortgages and other such weighty matters?

All I can find through google are sites that are marketing for one or another loan company, and call me cynical, I don't think they really have my best interests at heart.

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Hate filled bitch musings...

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kentishmaid
Shipmate
# 4767

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We need to buy a new knife sharpener, since our current one is apparently not much cop. Does anyone know which is the best sort/brand to get?

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"Who'll be the lady, who'll be the lord, when we are ruled by the love of one another?"

Posts: 2063 | From: Huddersfield | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

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In the absence of a stone doorstep or windowsill (mother's knife-sharpening equipment, back in my childhood) I would recommend a proper sharpening steel. I've never found any other knife sharpener that does the job so well.

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Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

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philip99a
Shipmate
# 13799

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I was persuaded by my local cookware shop to buy one of these..

Hmmm.... very expensive, and I'm not at all sure it does a good job. My sister has an electric gadget, pair of carborundum wheels (made by Moulinex I think) which grinds away the knife eventually but produces a great edge!

My dad always used the back step to excellent effect. But I don't have a back step here!

I'd buy a butcher's steel, my brother swears by his. But I don't have the knack or the knowledge of how to use it properly.

Can anyone help me on this (or know a good description on a website somewhere)???

I use one so clumsily and randomly that I can't see it producing a true edge at all!

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We shall not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time T. S. Elliot (Four Quartets)

Posts: 1300 | From: Leicester (UK) | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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quote:
Originally posted by Emma Louise:
Central heating is still a bit of a novelty to us... we were just wondering what people consider a "normal" room temperature to set the thermostat too. I'm quite aware this will vary widely -we'd like it lowish as that will be cheaper but we don't want to freeze either...

Just curious [Big Grin]

Half way between cool cold for me, and too hot for her.

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I upped mine. Up yours.
Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?

Posts: 12001 | From: between keyboard and chair | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
amber.
Ship's Aspiedestra
# 11142

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Thanks, Jengie. That's a really helpful site. I was just blundering about, googling.

It was too big to be a black redstart, and it's the wrong time of year, and wrong area for a redstart.

The fieldfare is closest, but I don't think it was a fieldfare. It was more of a uniform pale grey. I originally thought it might be an immature collared dove, because it was the right colour, but smaller, sleeker and skinnier, and it didn't have the distinctive collar. However, even immature collared doves should have the collar.

Try the RSPB bird identifier on their website. Handy tool that lets you click what you remember about the bird and it makes suggestions for what it might be? RSPB Bird Identifier Tool
Posts: 5102 | From: Central South of England | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
The Great Gumby

Ship's Brain Surgeon
# 10989

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
viruses (or should that be virii)

No, it shouldn't. I assume you think it should because virus is a latin word, but the latin word means "poison", and there is no plural. Even if you prefer to always use classical plural forms, you've got no option in this case but to call them viruses.

This page is a very thorough explanation of why.


Phil99a, a steel is the best and simplest option, IMO. There are demonstration videos of how to use them available on the web, but a simple guide is to hold the steel across your body at arms length with your weaker hand, then use your stronger hand to hold the knife at about a 45 degree angle to it, and draw it across the steel (towards the back of the knife) and towards you. Repeat for the other side of the blade, which will require you to reposition the steel to point more away from you.

Once you've done this slowly and gently a few times, you should start to get the idea, and will be able to get faster and firmer.

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The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. - Richard Feynman

A letter to my son about death

Posts: 5382 | From: Home for shot clergy spouses | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Lola

Ship's kink
# 627

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My cat likes to eat cake mix but I don't know whether I should really let him so I only ever let him lick the spoon and not the bowl as he would really prefer.

Is it bad for him? I made a standard victoria sponge for valentines day with a nice icing sugar heat on the top, so it was just sugar, butter (actually margarine), flour, baking powder and eggs.

NB I am of course talking about after the cake is in the oven and I am cleaning up - the cat does not get a look in whilst preparation is taking place!

Posts: 951 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
kentishmaid
Shipmate
# 4767

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Thank you! Have just ordered a professional Sheffield-made one from eBay. Hopefully it will do the job. I have a feeling my husband will enjoy using it, too (boys & toys etc).

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"Who'll be the lady, who'll be the lord, when we are ruled by the love of one another?"

Posts: 2063 | From: Huddersfield | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by philip99a:
Hmmm.... very expensive, and I'm not at all sure it does a good job. My sister has an electric gadget, pair of carborundum wheels (made by Moulinex I think) which grinds away the knife eventually but produces a great edge!

Actually any sharpener will wear away the knife eventually. I dine with a former surgeon and his wife about once a month. The meal is nearly always a roast which he carves. He always sharpens the same knife with a steel before carving. The knife shows distinct patterns of wear from this sharpening process.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Leaf
Shipmate
# 14169

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Calling any bird-wise types:

I'd like to put up some kind of bird feeder in a hedge of villosa lilac -- chickadees seem attracted there. The problems are: (1) there is a narrow much-used walkway between said hedge and kitchen window, so the feeder would have to be smallish and probably mounted amidst the branches; (2) it's close to an outdoor garbage area, so I am very keen to avoid attracting squirrels and mice with the feeder.

Any suggestions?

Posts: 2786 | From: the electrical field | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Advice on not attracting squirrels and mice.

  • Get Feeder Tray so seeds and such don't fall to the ground. That alerts mice and squirrels to their being food above.
  • Put pepper in the food (birds don't taste it, unlike squirrels and mice)
  • Get a Squirrel Guard to stop access.
  • A Guardian is one way to deter pigeons, but they will try and swing the feeder to get food to drop out and onto the ground. If this happens it then tells mice and squirrels that there is food above. So if you can afford it try and get something like Yankee Dipper which will shut down for both squirrels and large birds.

Jengie

[ 18. February 2009, 18:09: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Originally posted by Amber:

quote:
Try the RSPB bird identifier on their website. Handy tool that lets you click what you remember about the bird and it makes suggestions for what it might be? RSPB Bird Identifier Tool


Thanks, Amber! I think it was a field fare. It was surrounded by snow. Perhaps the light bouncing off the snow made it appear paler than it really was.

For all you twitchers, we've had loads of waxwings this year. At one point we had eight in the tree in our garden. I've never seen so many, so close, before.

Posts: 6414 | From: North East Scotland | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Another bird question. Are there any birds that breed in the southern hemisphere and spend their winter (our summer) in the Northern Hemisphere?

It just occurred to me that all the examples of migratory birds, I knew of seemed to be the other way around.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
PrettyFly

Ship's sunbather
# 13157

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When I read the Mallory Towers books by Enid Blyton (probably around 1990) the copies I owned had the most beautiful illustrations on the covers (and a few inside the books themselves). I stupidly got rid of my books and now can't find them with the same covers.

I'm pretty sure they were quite old copies when I had them, probably bought second hand. The pictures have a sort of 1950's feel to them.

The one I rememeber most clearly was the cover for Upper Fourth at Mallory Towers, which had a really pretty picture of a sunrise coming up over the lacrosse field. It was all very blue and yellow, pale but in an almost sparkling way.

Does anyone else remember these covers, or have any info about the illustrator?

Why, oh why did my mother let me get rid of them?? [Waterworks]

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Screw today. I'm going for ice cream.

Posts: 1797 | From: Where the sun keeps shining and where the weather suits my clothes | Registered: Nov 2007  |  IP: Logged
Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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quote:
Originally posted by PrettyFly:

The one I rememeber most clearly was the cover for Upper Fourth at Mallory Towers, which had a really pretty picture of a sunrise coming up over the lacrosse field. It was all very blue and yellow, pale but in an almost sparkling way.

Looks like you mean this one. No information about the illustrator sadly!

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Posts: 4413 | From: Suffolk UK | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Qoheleth.

Semi-Sagacious One
# 9265

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What's with the 12 inch high temporary polythene sheet fences that sprout randomly around the verges of UK motorways? I'm assuming they're something to do with wildlife, but can anyone give a definitive answer, please? I'll try and (safely) post a pic, if we draw a blank.

Thanks,
Q.

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Posts: 2532 | From: the radiator of life | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
St. Gwladys
Shipmate
# 14504

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quote:
Originally posted by Qoheleth.:
What's with the 12 inch high temporary polythene sheet fences that sprout randomly around the verges of UK motorways? I'm assuming they're something to do with wildlife, but can anyone give a definitive answer, please? I'll try and (safely) post a pic, if we draw a blank.


I drive over a mountain raod to work, and shortly before a major developement started at the wayside, (Merthyr residents will know what I mean) the road was fenced and the fences had polythene sheeting along them. I asked the same question on our works internet, and was told it was because there might have been newts on the boggy ground there - if there were, they had to be caught and removed to a safe area. I've had the same answer from a couple of people, so I'm assuming it's true!

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amber.
Ship's Aspiedestra
# 11142

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Another bird question. Are there any birds that breed in the southern hemisphere and spend their winter (our summer) in the Northern Hemisphere?

Jengie

Sooty Shearwaters [Smile]
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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by PrettyFly:
I'm pretty sure they were quite old copies when I had them, probably bought second hand. The pictures have a sort of 1950's feel to them.

I can't swear to it but they look quite like the ones I had in 1970. I worked my way through the set that year.
Posts: 25445 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
PrettyFly

Ship's sunbather
# 13157

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
quote:
Originally posted by PrettyFly:

The one I rememeber most clearly was the cover for Upper Fourth at Mallory Towers, which had a really pretty picture of a sunrise coming up over the lacrosse field. It was all very blue and yellow, pale but in an almost sparkling way.

Looks like you mean this one. No information about the illustrator sadly!
Interesting... that picture does look familiar, but not like the one I was thinking of! I wonder... thanks anyway! Good site [Smile]

Ariel - do you still have yours?

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Sorry, no, they went the way of these things, a few decades ago.
Posts: 25445 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by PrettyFly:
When I read the Mallory Towers books by Enid Blyton (probably around 1990) the copies I owned had the most beautiful illustrations on the covers (and a few inside the books themselves). I stupidly got rid of my books and now can't find them with the same covers.

I'm pretty sure they were quite old copies when I had them, probably bought second hand. The pictures have a sort of 1950's feel to them.

The one I rememeber most clearly was the cover for Upper Fourth at Mallory Towers, which had a really pretty picture of a sunrise coming up over the lacrosse field. It was all very blue and yellow, pale but in an almost sparkling way.

Does anyone else remember these covers, or have any info about the illustrator?

Why, oh why did my mother let me get rid of them?? [Waterworks]

PrettyFly, This site should help.

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Posts: 18917 | From: "Central" is all they call it | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by amber.:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Another bird question. Are there any birds that breed in the southern hemisphere and spend their winter (our summer) in the Northern Hemisphere?

Jengie

Sooty Shearwaters [Smile]
Thanks. It did seem an anomaly if birds thought the world was the same way up as us northern humans.

Jengie

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Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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Our UK Freeview box seems to have stopped working. You can still view a menu of all the channels, but they all say 'programme unavailable'. Its been like this for over a week. Assuming there is not a general problem with Freeview broadcasts (anyone care to confirm that they are still receiving it OK?) do I assume its time to replace the box? Tried updating the channel info, but still nothing.

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Posts: 4413 | From: Suffolk UK | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Astro
Shipmate
# 84

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Our UK Freeview box seems to have stopped working. You can still view a menu of all the channels, but they all say 'programme unavailable'. Its been like this for over a week. Assuming there is not a general problem with Freeview broadcasts (anyone care to confirm that they are still receiving it OK?) do I assume its time to replace the box? Tried updating the channel info, but still nothing.

It may mean that your box is broken but first check that you are getting any kind of signal.
Is your aerial broke or the lead connecting your aerial to the freeview box? Can you still get analogue TV? If analogue TV is then it sounds like your freeview box is broken.

Though for a while I was getting a poor signal on the BBC muxes and the others channels were OK but what had happened was that the box was picking up the BBC channels froma different transmitter site than teh one my aerial was pointing to, and retuning fixed that.

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if you look around the world today – whether you're an atheist or a believer – and think that the greatest problem facing us is other people's theologies, you are yourself part of the problem. - Andrew Brown (The Guardian)

Posts: 2723 | From: Chiltern Hills | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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Analogue TV is working OK. The digital signal has never been brilliant here (we get some pixellation fairly often) but for all the freeview channels to have suddenly stopped, does perhaps seem to suggest there is a problem with the box.

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Fancy a break beside the sea in Suffolk? Visit my website

Posts: 4413 | From: Suffolk UK | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Melangell
Shipmate
# 4023

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Gracious Rebel, It would be worth trying the advice on p144 of the new Radio Times, about retuning your digibox. My DVD-cum-Freeview box seems to retune itself, but when I had a standalone Freeview box, it had to be reset from scratch when channel numbers changed. Just a thought...

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Gwnewch y pethau bychein (Dewi Sant)
Do the little things (Saint David)

Posts: 367 | From: A bit of Wales in Surrey | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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Can any American shipmate tell me the metric weight of a stick of butter please?

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
lily pad
Shipmate
# 11456

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Do you take answers from Canadians?

1 stick butter = 113.4 grams

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Sloppiness is not caring. Fussiness is caring about the wrong things. With thanks to Adeodatus!

Posts: 2468 | From: Truly Canadian | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged



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