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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Knitting and all things crafty
Mrs. Candle
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# 9422

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quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
Is this Rita, and this the sweater you mean?

Yes, that's it. The link that Babybear provided is going to be a great help in starting. I will need to figure out the little scoop neck and the sizing for an eight-year-old, but that shouldn't be too horribly difficult as long as I don't try to finish by Christmas.

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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Ann

Curious
# 94

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I've just been knitting some scarves for presents using a new (to me) technique.

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Ann

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Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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What is the technique called? I don't think I'm familiar with it. From the photos, it looks like you knit a very open fabric, then weave yarn through it. Looks interesting.

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Eschew obfuscation!

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Little Miss Methodist

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# 1000

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I'm currently knitting the afore mentioned Leo for a friend of mine. It's a pretty easy knit, though the endless rows of ribbing are getting to me a bit! I made some changes to the pattern and knitted the body in the round because I hate seaming and purling so this should minimise the amount of both that I have to do! I have about an inch to go with the body before I start the decreases for the sleeves and have to stop knitting in the round. I'm looking forward to this because it will instantly halve the number of stitches I need to do on each row.

I've knitted on Leo, and solely on Leo for the last two months and have really struggled with sticking to one pattern, especially because I keep looking at the copy of "Knitting Vintage Socks" that I got for my birthday and thinking about all the patterns I can't wait to knit! Those patterns, and my Koigu, Cherry Tree Hill and Lorna's Laces keep calling to me, and every time I walk past my yarn shelves I gaze longingly at all the different colours I have.

I gave in finally last night and cast on (tubular cast on) for the second sock in my Jaywalkers. I want to get these finished too, and it was really nice to knit something different. I'll return to knitting my friends jumper tonight at knitting group though.

LMM

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Tell me where you learned the magic,
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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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I normally have a big knit and a little knit on the go. The little knit fits in my bag when I go out. I knit at the bus stop, and again whilst traveling. Tis amazing how many of my socks have their existence due to bus travel. [Big Grin]
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I find I go on knitting jags - where I suddenly work obsessionally on something odd and unplanned.

The current one is for clearing down my stash of chunky yarns. I hit on a method for a shawl - all garter stitch, with regular rows of drop stitch - using up blue tweed yarn, torquoise, russet, fawn, dark green and orange. It is all turning out quite nicely, in a sort of Andean folkway look.

And yet I can't think of anything I have less use for than a multicoloured, thick shawl.

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Auntie Doris

Screen Goddess
# 9433

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
And yet I can't think of anything I have less use for than a multicoloured, thick shawl.

You might not have a use for it, but my cat would love it!

Auntie Doris x

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"And you don't get to pronounce that I am not a Christian. Nope. Not in your remit nor power." - iGeek in response to a gay-hater :)

The life and times of a Guernsey cow

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Ann

Curious
# 94

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quote:
Originally posted by Cranmer's baggage:
What is the technique called? I don't think I'm familiar with it. From the photos, it looks like you knit a very open fabric, then weave yarn through it. Looks interesting.

That's precisely it! I saw an example of Gedifra Scarf Net in a shop, but they'd run out of the net and weren't expecting to re-stock for a week or so, so I did some thinking. I thought that when I've done knitting on big needles and stretched it sideways, it forms a sort of a grid, so I looked around for one thick/one thin yarn with one plain and one fancy. I use 20mm needles and 12 stitches, garter stitch until the scarf is long enough, then weave the thick yarn. With the cream scarf, I left about 3 stitches each side as a border.

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Ann

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Mrs. Candle
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# 9422

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:


And yet I can't think of anything I have less use for than a multicoloured, thick shawl.

If you have a prayer shawl ministry in your area, they might like to have it. Many cancer patients cannot tolerate hats, but they are often cold and would love to have a nice, warm handknitted shawl. [Axe murder]

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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Gill H

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# 68

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I knitted 20 hats for Innocent smoothies this year!

( [Confused] go half the ship.)

Innocent - the smoothies/juices company - have been asking people to knit little hats to go on top of their smoothies. For every one which is sold in Sainsbury's or EAT from now till Christmas, 50p will be given to Age Concern.

I now have an irrational desire to go into every Sainsbury's or EAT I can find, to see if I can find one of my own hats!

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*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
The current one is for clearing down my stash of chunky yarns.

Instead of making a shawl that you don't want, how about warm scarves?

I am knitting scarves for my local Women's Refuge. I know that my local Salvation Army Citadel is happy to distribute hats, and scarves at this time of year.

I have just finished a long, pointy hat (think elf) in Colinette One Zero in Jamboree. It is a hat to make me smile, and this very same hat makes my children squirm when I say that I will were it out in public. [Big Grin]

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I don't really do socially concerned knitting. The poor will just have to wait until I do my periodic clear-out to the charity shops as usual.

Actually, I did once see one of my donated handknits walking the streets. It was on the charity worker I had given stuff to.

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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I treat myself to an Innocent smoothie each time I do a 'big shop' at Sainsbury's. Never seen one with a woolly hat on.

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Gill H

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# 68

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I think the woolly hatted ones started being sold this week. Saw my first yesterday (and no, it wasn't one of my hats!)

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*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

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Tea gnome
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# 9424

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Wondering if anyone would have any advice on buying a sewing machine. I'm not quite sure what I'd use it for; just at the moment I'm getting fed up of sewing little seams for lavender bags by hand (and they're not very good seams either), but it seems like a Useful Thing to have.
I saw a few today, but have no idea how to judge. Prices went from about £100 to £1500 ( [Eek!] that one made lace, but at that price I'd expect it to make tea and do the laundry too!) And abilities seemed to range from twenty kinds of stitch to the aforementioned lacemaking. The lady in John Lewis said it was Necessary to have one which would work with stretch fabric.
What would you look for? I could see a time when I might try my hand at making children's clothes, but I don't know what else.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Tea gnome:
Wondering if anyone would have any advice on buying a sewing machine.
<snip>
The lady in John Lewis said it was Necessary to have one which would work with stretch fabric.
What would you look for? I could see a time when I might try my hand at making children's clothes, but I don't know what else.

I make all of my trousers and various household items.

I think you can get along very well with a sturdy, durable machine that does straight-stitching and zigzag, including buttonholes. When I sew stretch fabrics, I set the stitch length at long and hold the fabric in a stretched position while I sew it. I think my newer machine has a stretch stitch, but I've never bothered with it.

I bought my old machine second-hand in 1963. If it did zigzag I would never have bought another. It is very heavy and durable; my daughters and I call it The Tank. It handles heavyweight fabric, which is something that many lightweight machines cannot do. When I make jeans I thread the newer machine with regular thread and the old one with top-stitching thread and an extra-large needle. That's easier than having to keep changing threads and needles on one machine.

As a bit of general advice, don't be impressed by any features you can't imagine using. It's not important how many things the machine can do; the question is how well it does the things that you want to do.

Moo

[ 08. December 2006, 13:32: Message edited by: Moo ]

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Technically if it has zigzag it can handle stretch fabric. You just use a small and fairly narrow zig-zag rather than a straight stitch! You may need to relax the tension somewhat.

She will not be happy with me for saying this, but that's how I was taught to do it.

Jengie

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
I knitted 20 hats for Innocent smoothies this year!

I now have the start of a collection of Innocents Smoothie Hats.
Bearing in mind that we don't eat boiled eggs, so don't need any egg-cosies, what are we exoected to do with them?

Regarding sewing machines: My 'Jones' was bought in 1969, does straight stitch, zig zag, and a few other bits like buttonholes and 'elastic stitch', which has been perfectly adequate for most things.
What it doesn't do, is cope with jersey-type fabrics, which has been a real nuisance over the years, as these fabrics became ubiquitous. Nor can I drop the feed-dog on this model, which I discovered when I tried to take up free embroidery on the machine.

So, tea gnome, think carefully about what you want your machine to do, and get one that will do that, and maybe a little more. Don't buy an all-singing, all-dancing machine if you are unlikely to use all it's features.

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Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I had (and still do, somewhere in a far-distant cupboard) an old (as in Really Old) Singer, which had had an electric motor fitted. Still weighed a ton, but you could have sewn carpet with it.

I then got a Jones, which I've been using for about 20 years. It's fairly tinny, has a tendency to foul up thread, but, on the other hand has gamely sewn miles and miles of curtains.

I'll be getting it out after a long rest this w/end to do something in satin, so I'll see if it is still viable.

If I did upgrade, I would still only pay a couple of hundred at most.

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Hazey*Jane

Ship's Biscuit Crumbs
# 8754

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Any good knitting patterns for ties?

Don't ask.

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Mrs. Candle
Shipmate
# 9422

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If you Google "free knitting pattern necktie" you will get many, many patterns from which to choose.

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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Retsoc
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# 12027

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Knitted ties brings back memories of a Maths teacher I had at school who wore them - or they may have been crocheted!

Retsoc

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Blog

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Hazey*Jane

Ship's Biscuit Crumbs
# 8754

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quote:
Originally posted by Badfundie:
If you Google "free knitting pattern necktie" you will get many, many patterns from which to choose.

Well, yes, I did realise I could do that - I was kind of looking for personal recommendations as, given that I've a relative beginner, I don't know when looking at a pattern whether it's going to be any good or not. But google it will have to be. [Smile]
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Mrs. Candle
Shipmate
# 9422

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Sorry about that, it's just that not having information like the age and general taste of the recipient, I hesitated to make a more personal suggestion. The Lion website has a tie in seed stitch that should be pretty easy. As soon as I figure out how to post the link here, I will.

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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Little Miss Methodist

Ship's Diplomat
# 1000

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quote:
Originally posted by Tea gnome:
Wondering if anyone would have any advice on buying a sewing machine.

Don't buy a Singer. In my opinion, though they are one of the big names they are not up to much these days. My Mum has a Bernina that is 30 years old and still going strong so I would highly reccomend checking those out. My Janome is 11 years old and in perfect working order despite seeing very heavy use (I make all my own clothes) over the years.

Spend more getting a good quality basic machine rather than a cheaper fancy one with lots of stitches that you won't ever use. Zig Zag stitch, straight lines, maybe a wavy live stith are pretty much all you'll need. Mine also has a special setting for doing button holes and i'd reccomend that too.

Buy a machine that you can get parts for easily and replacement bobbins / feet for near where you live. Once you have your machine, get it serviced relatively regularly (I used to get mine done once a year but haven't done recently because i've not had the time to use it as much as I used to). Services are around £50 where I live.

It's probably worth going to an independent sewing machine shop and taking the time to talk to the sales person about what you want - don't go to a Singer shop or any other franchise because they'll try to convince you that theirs is the best - an independent retailor will give you a reccomendation based on your needs.

LMM

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Tell me where you learned the magic,
The spell you used the day you made me fall....


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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Another option is to check Freecycle or places that have second hand machines. There are many old machines that are fantastic and will happily chunter along for years yet. Reconditioned old, old Singers (the ones that weight a tonne) are good too. they can cope with anything you throw at them.

bb

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Tea gnome
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# 9424

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Thankyou for all you advice, lots of aspects I hadn't really considered, soory I didn't check back in sooner. LMM, I have to admit one of my first thoughts was "I could get a Singer, I've heard of them" (!) so that's a useful idea. I may get the yellow pages out tomorrow. And try freecycle.
Gnome

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Here is one useful test of a machine you're thinking of buying. See how slowly it will sew. On a tricky project, speed control is essential.

Moo

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Zoey

Broken idealist
# 11152

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Hello crafty people, I have questions about making hooked rag rugs.

I’ve picked up a second-hand book about making rag rugs. The majority of the projects in the book are hooked rugs made using a hook and working on a hessian/burlap background. One of the projects is a hooked rug made by using a latch-hook and working on a canvas background – but in this project the latch of the latch-hook is taped out of the way using a small piece of sticky tape.

Preliminary enquiries suggest to me that latch-hooks are more readily available for sale than other rug hooks. Having studied my rag rug book, it looks to me as though using a general rug hook (i.e. a hook without a latch) and using a latch-hook with the latch taped back are very similar techniques. It seems to me that the main difference is that a latch-hook might not be able to pierce hessian the way the other type of hook does, so if using a latch-hook you need to work on canvas not hessian. To me, working on canvas looks easier anyway (I presume the downside is that it’s more expensive than hessian).

From study of my book I have concluded that I think it should be possible for me to do the following – create my own simple design, procure canvas and latch-hook, transfer outline of design onto canvas, use sticky tape to tape latch-hook latch out of the way, create rug by using standard hooking technique illustrated in rug-making book.

Have I missed some hidden subtleties of the whole rug-making malarkey? Am I exhibiting novice naivety and heading towards disaster? Or could my plan actually work?

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Pay no mind, I'm doing fine, I'm breathing on my own.

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Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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I think your cunning plan will work.

I got my rug hook at a workshop day run by Jenni Stuart-Anderson, who has written at least one book on rag rugging and appeared in others (usually doing braided rugs, but she teaches hooking and prodding as well).

For hooking, you do need to keep the canvas/hessian base taut, preferably on a frame, otherwise it is very difficult to do, and comes out lumpy.

Proggy/prodding is much easier, as you can just sling the hessian over your knee and get stuck in. You can do it the traditional way, with a six inch nail or some similar long pointy implement, but I use a tool rather like a pair of scissors - from the front of the rug, you poke the tool in and then out on the right side again about half an inch on, open the 'jaws' and insert your 3" strip of material, and pull back until the material makes a tuft, equal on both sides.

Again, I got the tool from Jenni Stuart-Anderson.
She also sells speed shuttles, which work from the wrong side of the base fabric, giving a finish like hooking, only much faster.

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Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Hazey Jane

I really do not think you will get any pattern simpler that this one for a necktie. You will need to know how to knit, increase and decrease, but you do not even need to know how to knit pearl. and casting on or off is even limited. No sewing together either.

Jengie

[ 13. December 2006, 14:10: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

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Roxanna
Apprentice
# 9639

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Thanks to Babybear for the odessa hat link. I've knitted five as Christmas presents.

I now want to knit something for me, so can anybody suggest a pattern for a big wrap/shawl thing? I want something that is easier to keep on than a basic rectangle, but not a poncho.

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Here is one useful test of a machine you're thinking of buying. See how slowly it will sew. On a tricky project, speed control is essential.

Moo

I have an old, very heavy Bernina which I bought second hand 25 years ago. It has a lower gear than can easily be engaged and used to sew slowly.

I do very little sewing, but have found it good for making craft items.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Roxanna:
Thanks to Babybear for the odessa hat link. I've knitted five as Christmas presents.

I can't remember if I mentioned, there is a scarf that is pretty similar in nature, called the Bertie (.pdf warning). It was designed by a lass I know for a competition in a knitting magazine. She came in second place with it.

quote:
I now want to knit something for me, so can anybody suggest a pattern for a big wrap/shawl thing? I want something that is easier to keep on than a basic rectangle, but not a poncho.
knitty.com is a totally excellent place for free patterns, brilliant articles and all round inspiration. Their pattern archive is normally the first place I go when I am looking for a new project.

In the archive they have Convertible. It was designed by a woman who has problems keeping normal wraps in place. The basic construction is a long lace rectangle, with a garter stitch border. Into the border, she has worked button holes. She has made her own form of cufflinks that go through the holes and can convert the wrap into a shrug, or a poncho. Three looks from the same piece of knitted fabric.

If you aren't fussed by the lace pattern she has used, you could substitute in a different pattern quite easily.

[ 01. January 2007, 08:16: Message edited by: babybear ]

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Anyone has a John Lewis near them, there are some good yarns in their sale. I got quantities of Debbie Bliss dk in navy, dark brown and torquoise (which I purpose to put with some terracotta I already have).

But just now, I am knitting up various blue, pinks and green. One of the yarns, I have had for, I think, 32 years.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
frin

Drinking coffee for Jesus
# 9

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I've started a blog (see my sig) to keep track of my crochet projects and have put a description of the fingerless gloves I mentioned on this thread up there.

'frin

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"Even the crocodile looks after her young" - Lamentations 4, remembering Erin.

Posts: 4496 | From: a library | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Suzywoozy
Shipmate
# 6259

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On a previous knitting thread someone recommended the Ladybird knitting book. I found one on ebay and started. I found it really easy to follow with no previous experience. So thank you whoever posted that.

What I couldn't (and still can't) do is follow a pattern. I look at one, even one that says easy and my brain kind of freezes.

However we have recently formed a LETS group and I requested knitting help (as did two others) an expert responded and now we have a little group going.

So having done scarves courtesy of ladybird, I am now doing a bag on circular needles which is going to be felted.

I love felting, I have gone to a few groups and made a couple of bags and a wall hanging. But I have never done knitted felting as I haven’t been able to knit, so I’m really excited by the idea of doing some.

What I would like to ask is how I get started on patchwork, I want to do something really really basic, can anyone recommend a good book or website - I'd be very happy with guidelines aimed at children as I find I can follow these - Thanks

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jerusalemcross
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# 12179

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quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
oooh, a knitting thread [Yipee]

I have grand plans for socks - I have the yarn already (a lovely purplish wool) but now I need needles! I have been warned against the standard circulars they sell at Spotlight (local crafty/haberdashery/manchester mega-store) because they snag the yarn at the point where the needle joins the plastic bit. I may decide to just buy Addis.

Have just discovered this thread. (What a pun!!)
Try seeing if you can get hold of "Denise" circular needles, I think they're American - they are "modular" in that you get a kit of "ends" and "middles" and slot the two together. I've used them a bit and find that there isn't any snag between the ends and the middles if they're put together properly (the set comes with instructions and you can get spares). The huge advantage is that you only need the one infinitely variable set, and if you want to pause in the middle of one project and start another you only need to put supplied stop ends onto the middles and attach the pointy ends to another set of middles. Sounds complicated but is really useful. The mfrs claim that they pass through airline security but I haven't had the nerve to test them. Not cheap but less than a whole set of single-numbered circulars.

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What's the difference between an organist and a terrorist? You can negotiate with a terrorist.

Posts: 305 | From: somewhere west of Eden | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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Embroidery on T shirts

I thought this might be the best place to ask this, rather than starting a new thread.

I've bought a rather boring t shirt (it was cheap).I thought I would use waste canvas and xstitch a small flower on it. Has anyone done this? Would it be a good idea to iron some vilene on the wrong side before I start?

Any other hints gratefully accepted.

Huia (spacing probs)

[ 02. January 2007, 23:49: Message edited by: Huia ]

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
jerusalemcross
Shipmate
# 12179

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Huia, I would use hardanger linen or heavy counted-thread embroidery fabric for your flower xstitch rather than canvas; plus vilene - but do check that the vilene you use is washable. I think canvas would be too rigid and possibly scratchy through the t shirt material. Ick...

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What's the difference between an organist and a terrorist? You can negotiate with a terrorist.

Posts: 305 | From: somewhere west of Eden | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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Jerusalemcross the waste canvas method uses a light canvas that is tacked (basted)to the t-shirt, the threads in the canvas providing a grid over which to cross-stitch. Whe the design is stitched the canvas is dampened and its threads are carefully pulled out with tweezers.

Hence not icky itch. Magic [Biased] .

Good point about ensuring the vilene is washable.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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I lovedoing patchwork (well - iusedtodo very basic patchwork) and would love toget back into thatagain one day.

My current plan is the new weekly knitting magazine which encourages you to knit a square a week, and teaches you a new technique every week.

The downfall is my work/life balance is seriously out of kilter at the moment,so time to actually do these thigns is limited!!

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Retsoc
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# 12027

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I've started a new patchwork project over Christmas - a colleague at work asked me to make it for her. It was going fantastically... until my sewing machine jammed and it now won't sew properly. [Waterworks] It's (hopefully) being repaired, but I am getting withdrawal symptoms.

Retsoc

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Try seeing if you can get hold of "Denise" circular needles, I think they're American
I've never used Denise needles but belong to several sock groups on Yahoo. The comments there are that the Denise set does not go down to a small enough size to knit good dense sock fabric. So check what you want them for and what sizes come in the set..

Personally, I prefer to use double pointed and for socks use 2.25 mm or sometimes 2.75 mm if I'm using somethng thicker than normal sock wool, like 5 0r 6 ply thickness. Usually I make socks on 3 or 4 ply.. Others use magic loop with one circular or knit two socks simultaneously on two circular needle.

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Posts: 9745 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Would it be a good idea to iron some vilene on the wrong side before I start?

I have done similar things with children's clothes. I used the waste canvas technique to get the embroidery in place, and then afterwards I used iron-interfacing on the back of the stitches. This gave a nice smooth finish to the back of the design.

I have used this technique on commercially embroidered things too. Sometimes the embroidery is just too irritating, especially if it meant to be worn next to the skin (eg t-shirt or pjs). The application of some iron-on interfacing smooths every considerably.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gill H

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# 68

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I'm alternating between cross stitch and knitting at the moment. Cross stitching a little card of a teddy bear mowing the lawn, for my dad's 75th birthday on Saturday. And knitting a sweater for a penguin. Yes, really. Details here.

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- Lyda Rose

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I got a couple of really cool cross-stitch kits for Christmas - a scene of Bruges for which I dropped hints like tons of bricks and a map of Norfolk with little pictures of well-known landmarks etc. Whether I'll ever have time to do them is another matter. I've already done the tiny little teddy bear keyring kit though. [Smile]

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
daisydaisy
Shipmate
# 12167

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Ages ago when I was lurking there was a link on this thread to something that appealed to me - so here and here are photos of the results.

I think the bags might be my "knit of the year" like these were for 2006 and these were before (although I also made one in pinks for my god-daughter for Christmas 2006 - she calls it her marshmallow jumper!)

[edited to add that I use double pointed needles for my sock addiction - I think the long flexible ones wouldn't be short enough]

[ 03. January 2007, 11:25: Message edited by: daisydaisy ]

Posts: 3184 | From: southern uk | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
jerusalemcross
Shipmate
# 12179

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
quote:
Try seeing if you can get hold of "Denise" circular needles, I think they're American
I've never used Denise needles but belong to several sock groups on Yahoo. The comments there are that the Denise set does not go down to a small enough size to knit good dense sock fabric. So check what you want them for and what sizes come in the set..

Personally, I prefer to use double pointed and for socks use 2.25 mm or sometimes 2.75 mm if I'm using somethng thicker than normal sock wool, like 5 0r 6 ply thickness. Usually I make socks on 3 or 4 ply.. Others use magic loop with one circular or knit two socks simultaneously on two circular needle.

Yes, you're right, the Denise ones (or indeed any fixed circular ones)don't have short enough middles to do decent socks unles you're knitting for Hagrid. DP needles are much the best; the really good bamboo ones don't slip as much as metal. The Denise set I have only goes down to 3.75mm (English size 9) whatever that is in USA. I'm not a sock knitter, more of an Aran and the-more-complicated-the-better jumper one. [Yipee] If I want socks I go to Marks & Spencer or the craft shows.

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What's the difference between an organist and a terrorist? You can negotiate with a terrorist.

Posts: 305 | From: somewhere west of Eden | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Adrienne
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# 2334

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Does anyone know of stockists of Berroco wool in the UK please? - Google has not been my friend, and I want to knit this cuddly thing.

cheers!
A

Posts: 977 | From: UK | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged



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