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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Knitting and all things crafty
Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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I've got confirmation now that my "art of knitting" magazine will be coming... but it hasnt come yet. What is really puzzling is that its a weekly mag, so they send you 4 copies once a month. Wouldnt it make more sense to make it monthly?!
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Anna B
Shipmate
# 1439

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I am so excited! My in-laws gave me a subscription to a Swedish weaving magazine, Vavmagasinet, for Christmas.

Now all I have to do is acquire a floor loom... [Paranoid]

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Bad Christian (TM)

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Pax Romana
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# 4653

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Well, I just finished making a really cute "pouffet" hat, from a pattern developed by a friend of mine from my church. This lady is an extremely accomplished knitter and crocheter.

The hat is really cute.

I'll be glad to pass the pattern on to whoever would like to try it.

Pax R.

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********************
I used to wake up at 4 A.M. and start sneezing, sometimes for five hours. I tried to find out what sort of allergy I had but finally came to the conclusion that it must be an allergy to consciousness.
James Thurber

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Mrs. Candle
Shipmate
# 9422

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Yes, pass it to me [Yipee] I am sort of on a hat binge right now and I need more patterns. Thank you for the offer.

Thanks to Babybear for the Odessa pattern, btw. I made one for a friend for Christmas and will probably do 1 or 2 more.

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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The needles that are used for socks is a very personal thing. I know people who love their bamboo double pointed needles (dpn), some who love metal, or plastic one, and others like the magic loop method and I adore using 2 circs. There are some extremely helpful video clips available that show these techniques.

I would be incredibly loathed to go back to using dpns instead of circular needles for socks. I use circular needles for practically everything now. However, my set of Denise needles only goes down to a 3.75mm, which isn't small enough for 4-ply socks. I use 2.5mm Addi Turbos for them.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Little Miss Methodist

Ship's Diplomat
# 1000

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Sock needles are a very personal choice. I always use DPN's and generally go for 2.25mm as I seem to get a really nice even fabric with that size. Up until recently i've only used metal ones as I like really really sharp points on my needles but I needed a new set because all my needles were occupied and I wanted to make my Dad some gloves for christmas, so I bought some bamboo double pointed needles from Libertys and have been really pleased with them. I've got some brittany birch double pointed ones as well but i'm really not keen on those, partly because I find they flex a bit too much for my liking, and partly because they are too short and I find them awkward to knit with.

I'm knitting the gloves from Jaegar matchmaker merino 4ply on 2.5mm double points. I'm making up my own pattern for fingerless gloves as I go along and have been very pleased with the results so far. I'm about halfway through the second glove.

LMM

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Tell me where you learned the magic,
The spell you used the day you made me fall....


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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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I used to knit quite a bit, then got hand trouble, and quit. However I am determined to teach both my God daughters to knit and crochet. My sister is quite up to teaching my niece. Well to that end over New Year I gave the older of my two God Daughters her first crocheting lesson. I had not crocheted for yonks, but realised it might not put a strain on my left hand. So am now going to try crocheting her a scarf for her birthday. Should be simple enough.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

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Anna B
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# 1439

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Inspired by this thread, I went online last night and ordered some lovely Dale of Norway wool yarn in "sand." We've been feeling the lack of an afghan in the family room for some time, so I'm going to crochet one. Very simple, just double crochet all the way through, to show off the beauty of the wool.

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Bad Christian (TM)

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samara
Shipmate
# 9932

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I'm curious about knitted socks, so I thought I'd ask the experts.

So, on to knitted socks. My first thought was of the scratchy-but-warm slippers my grandmother made (with acrylic yarn, I think). Not particularly enticing. Yet I hear of felting merino wool, and I wonder: do knitted socks have to be bulky? How comfy do they get, assuming adequate skill? Can they be fairly light, suitable for summer, or does that require machines?

I once learned something about knitting, but never got really proficient. I have crocheted more. Knitting is tempting, particularly if I could make use of the results. There's more nice patterns for knitting than crocheting, I find.

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Bookworms will rule the world (after we finish the background reading).
Courtesy of Trouble in China

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Mrs. Candle
Shipmate
# 9422

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Once you've managed to obtain a well-made pair of hand-knitted socks you will never want mass-produced socks again. There are lots of good books (one of the best is Knitting Rules! by the Canadian author Stephanie Pearl-McPhee) that could be helpful to you. If you are willing to use tiny needles and fine yarn, you can make socks as fine as you like. And don't turn your nose up at all acrylics. They've changed a lot. I'm just barely speaking from experience, though. I'm working on a pair of socks on #3 (American size, 3.25 mm) needles with suri alpaca yarn and that's the finest I've used so far.

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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I second Badfundie's comments about handknitted socks. You can make them to suit your feet, just bliss.

Samara, they don't need to be bulky. I think many in the USA seem to make them on big needles out of thicker yarn. I'm an Aussie and usually use what is sold as sock yarn, what we would call down here 3 or 4 ply. Like baby wool. I usually do the legs of mine on 2.75 mm needles and then go to 2.25 for the feet as that makes a strong fabric which wears well. Somewhere between 8-10 stitches/inch. Difference because of needles does not show when worn.

Another good book is Sensational Knitted Socks by Charlene Scurch. I bought my copy from Amazon. About US$16. This shows the anatomy of a sock and you can make a small one as an experiment. It has stitch dictionaries with instructions to suit your tension and the pattern you choose, all neatly set out in tables and instructions for making the sock.

Socknitters is a very large site with tutorials and online help and a yahoo group with lots of mail and help.

Acrylics are much improved, although I have arthritis in my hands and my fingers really prefer natural fibres. I buy sock yarn which has a percentage of nylon for long wear in it. I also have made socks from machine washable 5 ply and crepe. All these go in the washing machine and occasionally the dryer too. No problems. I do have some luxury socks and do these by hand.

It's hot down here, but I knit socks even in summer as they are small and don't sit in my lap like a shawl or something larger would.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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I would definitely not use acrylics for socks. They are not as warm as natural fibres, and they don't wick moisture away like them either.

I have make about 12 pair of socks in the past 18 months. I use 2.5mm needles and 4-ply yarn. This produce a fabric that is slightly thicker than shop-bought socks, but not as thick as sports socks.They are fun to make, and one you get the basic pattern in your head they are so simple. However, it can be quite daunting reading the pattern first time around, but as long as you do exactly what the pattern says then you should be fine, if not, ask questions.

In sock yarns I really like Opal, Regia, Lorna's Laces, Cherry Tree Hill and Lana Gross. Most of these contain about 25% nylon in the yarn. This give the wool strength. A wonderful on-line shop is Angel Yarns They offer good service and a large range of yarns. sock yarn page.

There are sock yarns available in DK (worsted) weight, and the recommended needles are 3.5mm.

Sock yarn is fantastic stuff. I knitted Gremlin a pair of socks and then used the leftover yarn to make a hat and sock set for a baby.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
bloodbro
Apprentice
# 12112

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if you are intending to knit socks learn how to darn them properly too
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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
I would definitely not use acrylics for socks. They are not as warm as natural fibres, and they don't wick moisture away like them either.

Yes but what do you knit socks in if you really cannot take wool? All the more need in that I wear thick socks and most of those you can buy are woollen.

I have one jumper 15% wool, worn over a cotton polo neck I manage to wear it for about three hours before I tear if off with frustration. I'd love to wear wool, have on a number occasions tried to force myself to, but have finally concluded that its a no go area for me.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Yes but what do you knit socks in if you really cannot take wool? All the more need in that I wear thick socks and most of those you can buy are woollen.

Ah, now that is a bit different. When you have a reaction against a specific yarn type then stay away from it and use something that doesn't make you want to rip your skin off.

Some wools, like Noro Kureyon are so 'wooly' that I can only stand them on my skin for about 20 seconds. Others like lambswool or merino are so soft and gentle that I can wear them all day.

Do you have the reaction to all wools, or are some worse than others? If some are worse than others I could send you some left over sock yarns so that you can test them to see if they might be okay for you. I am currently knitting socks in Lana Grossa cotton. This is a mix of 45% Cotton, 42% Virgin wool and 13% Polyamide. It feels so non-wooly that I had to read the ball band to check if there was wool in it.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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oooh - I thought I had posted on here and I cant find it *wails*.

Just to say that the "art of knitting" magazine has arrived (the first 2 anyway!) and its very exciting!!! Its got nice simple instructions (and a dvd so you can *see* what they're showing you*) and I'm much more confident already. They have practice thread as well as needles and some thread for the squares you make each week for the throw....

So far I have knitted and purled and made 2 squares - one that looks like "little ladders" [Smile] They are pretty colours too.

I'll have to wait for the next episode now... although in the mean time I've painted my wall [Big Grin]

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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I'm not terribly crafty (in a knitting kind of way) but someone at church is collecting clothes and blankets for new born babies in South Africa - apparently many leave hospital wrapped in newspaper because their parents cannot afford clothes.
I think I can only offer blankets, unless I do "square" jumpers (rectangles for arms & squares for bodies) which mightn't suit tiny babies. But I thought I'd declare my intentions of blanket knitting....


If, that is, the Cats allow me to knit and don't insist on tangling themselves in the wool. I bet they don't. And they do.

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What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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dawn treader
Shipmate
# 11296

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Hope you don't mind my joining you...

I'm slowly, steadily and very carefully making my way through a relatively basic Shetland shawl from Heirloom knitting, although the one-ply is doing my head in! Sister is due her third daughter on Palm Sunday, so I think it may be time to break into the more user-friendly Rowan wool-cotton and make a couple of baby things as deliciously light relief. Having said that, I do find the concentrated rhythmn of lace-knitting quite soothing.

Somewhat in awe of all the sock-knitting. I have never mastered four needles, despite many attempts, and have some beautiful but virtually unused sock yarn to show for it.

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We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.
T.S.Eliot, Little Gidding.

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Sock yarn doesn't just have to be used for socks. It can be used to make up any 4-ply pattern, and looks stunning when made into baby/toddler clothes.

Two really lovely examples are a pattern from Opal and Devan. Fingerless mitts also work really well in sock yarn, as do hats and gloves and lacy shawls.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
# 3571

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Wow - what fab piccies BB. I love that ladies shawl..... *drools*

At the moment Im enjoying little squares. Im not sure Id be patient/dedicated enough to do the big shawl but it is gorgeous!

I expect Ill be making things that can be made from little squares for a while.....!!

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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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That is up to you, of course, but that beautiful shawl can be made considerably smaller so that it just covers the shoulders. It is actually a pretty easy knit, with knit, purl, knit two together (k2tog) and a yarn forward. I suspect that it won't be long at all before you would be able to make it.
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daisydaisy
Shipmate
# 12167

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I have great respect for anyone who can make fancy shawlls - over 10 yrs ago I started a cobweb shawl, using 1 ply, and got so lost in the pattern that I never really knew where I should be. It's still in my projects cupboard and maybe, just maybe, one day I'll finish it. Or maybe I'll have a go at one of those wonderful Opal knitted shawls - the blus one looks so cozy.
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Hugal
Shipmate
# 2734

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As this is about crafty things in general.
I am starting a couple of scrapbooks for my and Gill H's special birthdays. Anyone out there croppers or card makers. I mainly do cards but some cropping. Gill is the needle crafter in our house, knitting and cross stitch. I just do paper.

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I have never done this trick in these trousers before.

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dawn treader
Shipmate
# 11296

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Fab idea to use the sock yarn. Just re-discovered some hand-dyed pink and burgundy and it's even machine washable. Baby cardie, I think!

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We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.
T.S.Eliot, Little Gidding.

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Lioba
Shipmate
# 42

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I can't stand things that lie around unused that's why I'd like to give away the instruction and the yarn for this embroidery. So if you're interested, just pm me.

Lioba

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Conversion is a life-long process.

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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Done 4 squares!!!

At an hour a square (I'm not a fast knitter!)this could be a labour of love, but at least I now do something constructive whilst watching rubbish on television!

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What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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I'm knitting a shawl. It's supposed to be very basic ribbing, knit 3, purl 3, but the first section didn't turn out that way because I didn't know what I was doing properly. Then, when I started to do the ribs, they reversed themselves a couple of times (which actually looks quite pretty).
I'm finding it quite liberating to knit with only an approximate nod towards the pattern, and not to have to Get It Right. On the way, I'm learning a lot, and I'm going to keep it just as it is, dropped stitch/ladder and all. When I've finished this, I know I'll be able to do a 'proper' one.

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Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

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Pax Romana
Shipmate
# 4653

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I recently knit a hat which was supposed to be done with a few rows of ribbing on the bottom, then stockinette all the way up.

I mis-read the pattern and ended up with a very cute hat with some nice looking "strips" where I had ended up reversing the stockinette. It worked, though, and it gives the hat character. So I just continued doing what I was doing.

The next time I make a hat using that pattern, I can either do it the "right" way or do it my way. It's nice to have a choice!

Pax Romana

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********************
I used to wake up at 4 A.M. and start sneezing, sometimes for five hours. I tried to find out what sort of allergy I had but finally came to the conclusion that it must be an allergy to consciousness.
James Thurber

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Retsoc
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# 12027

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quote:
Originally posted by Hugal:
As this is about crafty things in general.
I am starting a couple of scrapbooks for my and Gill H's special birthdays. Anyone out there croppers or card makers. I mainly do cards but some cropping. Gill is the needle crafter in our house, knitting and cross stitch. I just do paper.

I do card making and a variation of scrapbooking. Also the needlecrafts - patchwork and quilting mostly.

Retsoc

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Blog

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kentishmaid
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# 4767

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Just starting out with knitting. I had previously tried (and thought I'd managed) to learn as a child, but recently discovered I'd been doing it wrongly for years! Now that I've relearnt how to hold the yarn etc I'm finding it quite difficult to go at anything beyond snail's pace. I keep being guilty of 'throwing the yarn' and I'm finding that once I have a few rows done it becomes increasingly difficult to hold it properly as it bunches up and gets in the way of the knitting I'm actually trying to do! I'm hoping that practice makes perfect.

Decided that I'd just start with something terribly simple - a garter stitch scarf, but I'm not getting very far at the moment.

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"Who'll be the lady, who'll be the lord, when we are ruled by the love of one another?"

Posts: 2063 | From: Huddersfield | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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kentishmaid,
There is no 'wrong' way to knit. Most English language books will tell you a particular way of doing things - but some of the better ones will offer two or more options. If you learnt to knit in Europe, you'd be taught something different again. As someone who's been knitting for over 40 years, and teaching others to knit for 30, I firmly believe that if you're comfortable with what you're doing, and you are producing a fabric that you're happy with, then you are knitting the right way for you. If what you're trying as the 'right' way is not working for you, then how can it possible be right for you?

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Eschew obfuscation!

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I would second that.

I have been knitting the wrong way for about 50 years. I take my hand off the right needle to pass the yarn round (instead of hooking it over using the little finger). But it does, I maintain, produce a very even tension.

And Eigon - congratulations on discovering (by the sound of it) seed stitch* and basket** stitch.

*1 k, 1 p alternating, so that the knit stitch is purled in the next row, and the purl knitted.
**same idea, only in blocks, say 2 sts x 3 rows, so that the texture resembles basketweave.

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ecumaniac

Ship's whipping girl
# 376

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I have been knitting the wrong way for about 50 years. I take my hand off the right needle to pass the yarn round (instead of hooking it over using the little finger). But it does, I maintain, produce a very even tension.

Yes, I do that too! And until recently, I was yarnovering the wrong way when purling, so that when I turned to knit the next row, every single stitch was twisted.

Problem is, I quite liked the way my stockinette looked with the twisted stitches so now I try to create the same effect by knitting into the back loop.

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it's a secret club for people with a knitting addiction, hiding under the cloak of BDSM - Catrine

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Little Miss Methodist

Ship's Diplomat
# 1000

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quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
Yes, I do that too! And until recently, I was yarnovering the wrong way when purling, so that when I turned to knit the next row, every single stitch was twisted.
[/QB]

I did that too when I first started to knit. I got so frustrated with it that I took it into the knitting department at the House of Fraser where I used to live and showed it to the lovely lady who worked there and asked what I was doing wrong. She looked at it and told me it looked fine to her and she wished that she could get her tension that even. Whilst it was nice to be complimented, it wasn't helpful in terms of creating a knitted fabric that I liked so I kept looking through books until I found precise instructions about how to make a purl stitch and discovered what I had been doing wrong. Knowing the correct way was such a revelation to me - it was like someone suddenly turning a lightbulb on in my head.

Another knitting revelation I made was when I discovered knitting continental style rather than English. I had been doing the "throwing the yarn over" thing that Firenze described and to me it felt clumsy and un-natural, wheras continental knitting, when I tried it immediately felt "right". I find that continental knitting makes for smaller hand movements so feels neater and works faster, but then you will always tend to advocate what works for you!

As far as socks go, I always use DPN's because I like the way the different needles can mark out sections of the pattern and because I hate stitch markers. I like Cherry Tree Hill sock yarn, and Koigu KPPPM and Regia (particularly the India and Canada cotton stripes) I have some Fyberspates, some Lorna's Laces, some Fleece Artist and some Colinette Jitterbug as well, but since i've not used them yet, I can't make any assessment as to how nice they are to knit with.

I've got two pairs of socks on the go at the moment, as well as a pair of gloves and a large jumper for a friend of mine. I just finished another pair of gloves - my first finished object of 2007 - which I designed myself. I like them ok, and am mostly pleased with the way that they turned out, but am going to try making slight changes to the pattern for this second pair and see how that works.

LMM

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Tell me where you learned the magic,
The spell you used the day you made me fall....


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Mrs. Candle
Shipmate
# 9422

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Another "wrong way" knitter here.

About twenty years ago I took a knitting class with a teacher who kept scolding me for the way I was holding the needles and yarn. I quit trying because, obviously, I was no good at it and so why waste time? A couple of years ago I got an Elizabeth Zimmerman video tape out of the library and she was holding her yarn and needles the same way I had been holding mine!

I can't believe I deprived myself of the pleasure of accomplishment and creativity that knitting gives for so many years because of what some silly woman said. (also, continental style turned out to be easier for me.)

So, Kentishmaid, in the wise words of Staphanie Pearl-McPhee:

"There are a lot of ways to do things. Think outside the box and be in charge of your knitting.With wool as my witness, and despite how that lady treated you in the yarn shop that one time, there are no knitting police. Do what you want."

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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Mrs. Candle
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# 9422

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Yikes! It's Stephanie, of course, not Staphanie! [Hot and Hormonal]

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Je suis le président de Burundi.

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Just to prove there is no right way to knit. The way I was taught involves I think hooking it over with my right fore finger. Hands never leave the hands, because the little finger of the right hand controls the tension of the wool, the same way as a string player changes the note of a string.

As I was taught by two separate people, mother and paternal grandmother, of families separated for at least one hundred years. I am not sure where the common tradition comes from.

It must be common hand tradition, for when crocheting I can use two different ways of holding the wool in the left hand, one from my gran and one from my mother. My mother's is easier for a beginner but a skilled one would not use anything but my gran's. as my mothers gives too little control of the tension.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

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Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Jengie, I have been on the hunt for non-woolen sock yarn for you. And to my delight I found that Grumperina had already compiled an extensive list! Grumperina is the designer of the Odessa hat mentioned on this thread. She has one of the hottest knitting blogs, and writes really interesting and useful articles.

Her criteria when compiling the list were:
1. Absolutely no wooly fiber content, not even 1% wool or mohair, etc. Many sock yarns blend wool and cotton, and while I think they are a good choice for many (including myself for really, really, really arctic days), they do not constitute non-wooly sock yarns.
- silk is fine with me, although vegan knitters prefer to exclude it, too.
- I'm extremely hesitant to include yarns which are 100% synthetic because in my experience they are very heat-trapping. So, I'm limiting this list to yarns which are at least 50% natural fiber.

2. Thinness - fingering weight or thinner, which is 7 spi or more per 4" in stockinette.

3. Color and texture - I want to be able to knit fancy, patterned socks, maybe even ones with stranded/Fair Isle motifs! Therefore, it's ideal if the yarn is smooth and comes in solid colors.

4. Memory - hold its shape exceptionally well. In my experience, cotton or silk must be blended with elastic/lycra (not just any ol' synthetic fiber) in order to satisfy this criterion.

Grumperina's list has 19 different sock yarns (or yarns that can be knitted into nice socks).

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Brilliant, Brilliant, Brilliant, [Overused] [Overused] [Yipee] [Yipee]

This summers handicraft project will be a non-wool pair socks. This is after the two scarves for God-daughters.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

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Gill H

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# 68

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quote:
Originally posted by Pax Romana:
I recently knit a hat which was supposed to be done with a few rows of ribbing on the bottom, then stockinette all the way up.

I mis-read the pattern and ended up with a very cute hat with some nice looking "strips" where I had ended up reversing the stockinette. It worked, though, and it gives the hat character. So I just continued doing what I was doing.

The next time I make a hat using that pattern, I can either do it the "right" way or do it my way. It's nice to have a choice!

Pax Romana

The first jumper (sweater for you US-ians) I ever made myself had a repeating pattern in it. After doing two sleeves and half a back, I figured out why mine didn't look like the one in the picture - I'd been misunderstanding the instructions. So I figured what the heck, and carried on doing it 'wrong'. Then later I made myself another jumper doing the pattern correctly. One pattern, two garments!

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*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

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Canute the Holy
Shipmate
# 9394

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And I'm finally off on my craftsproject!

I'm doing an alb (no, not knitted! Would just look silly...). Sewing it after a pattern I found in Linda C Hall's book Making Eucharistic Vestments on a Limited Budget.
Hopefully it will be quite nice, and of better cut than those you can buy (at a much greater cost)...

[ 25. January 2007, 20:12: Message edited by: Canute the Holy ]

Posts: 183 | From: Sweden | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
mertide
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# 4500

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Any suggestions? I'm knitting a coat (in one piece, on circular needles) and I've finished the main part, which involved binding off for the sleeves and then casting on again the next row. So now I have to pick up the stitches for the sleeves, but my binding off tension was tighter than my cast on, and I think it might look weird and uneven and bunched at the back. Would I be better just to bite the bullet and pick up the stitches evenly or try to undo the bound off row so it's all evenly loose? The coat is very unstructured, basically a diamond shape with arm holes and the sleeves are large, but I suspect the arm might look puckered if I go as it is. This is the pattern I used. Please help, knitting gurus!
Posts: 382 | From: Brisbane | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Mertide,

I think I would probably undo the binding off and do it more loosely. Just my thoughts and I may change my mind if I saw your knitting in the flesh, so to speak.

It should be relatively easy to undo the cast off. More loosely?

You can just try hard to keep it loose.

You can do the cast off in needles a couple of sizes bigger than you were using.

You can try various other ways. Do a search on the terms you need. Here's an easy one. Knit 2. Lift back stitch on right hand needle over the first stitch. Just like common cast off.

Place that stitch back on left hand needle and knit 2. Lift stitch over and put remaining stitch back on left needle. And so on to end.

It's a bit time consuming but makes looser edge.

There are quite a few other ways of doing a loose cast off. Some are sewn, some knitted, some crocheted.

I'm sure others will be able to help.

[ 25. January 2007, 23:05: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

Posts: 9745 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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If it were me, I would re-do the bind off on slightly larger needles. And I would re-do it as many times as was needed to get it just right. I would rather not take the chance of puckering or too tight armholes. It won't take long to re-do the bind off, but it could make a big difference to the finished article.

Some things are worth taking the time to get them just right. Others can be skimmed over as they are not going to effect the line of the garment, how it is worn etc.

A useful technique is Short Rows Knitting. If you are binding off 15 st, and then casting on 15st in the next row (to put in a slit). Then instead of bind on and off, you could use a different yarn amd use the Short row technique.

The basic technique is to knit along the stitches that you are told to bind off. Then turn the work and purl along the 15st using a different yarn. Then turn and knit back along the 15 sts. After then you start knitting again with your original yarn. When you are ready to use the stitches that have been knit in the second yarn, take a small pair of scissors and snip out the extra yarn. Collect up the 15st on the top and bottom, and these now become 'live'.

I would give a word of caution, the technique above doesn't give a seams, and seams can be very useful in providing structure and stability to an item. In a coat for an adult I probably wouldn't use this method as the weight of the sleeves could easily distort the shoulders of the coat. However, I would use it for children's wear and also for things like buttonholes.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
mertide
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# 4500

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Thanks both of you. I suppose in a way I knew that was the only way, but I had hopes there was a simpler (lazier) way to make it right. It's actually been sitting reproachfully looking at me for months while I tried to convince myself I could just pick up the stitches, but it'll probably only take a little while to undo it and get it right. Next time I'll try the short row technique and save a lot of angst.
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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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The short row technique is really simple to do, but I can't stress enough that there is a very real danger of the sleeves of an adult's garment pulling down on the shoulders and distorting the garment. This could be as much as 5-7cm of extra sleeve length, and of course this would mean that the knitting across the shoulders would be very stressed and stretched.

I am a great fan of seamless garments (cos I prefer the knitting to the sewing up), but sometimes the seams are needed for strength and stability.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
mertide
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# 4500

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With this coat I don't think it will be a problem because it's quite a light mohair and the armholes are so dropped anyway that the sleeves are fairly short. Next time I try anything this large I'll bear that in mind though if it's weighty. I'm intrigued by the idea of knitting a jumper in the round, but the shoulder and sleeve fitting does worry me.
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Talking of picking up...

I am knitting something I hope will be a sort of semi-sleeved weskit (or vest as they say in 'murica).

The back is a rectangle, the fronts are straight at the sides, and with quite a long decrease on the inner side.

If it were to have sleeves, it would be a loose-fit, box-shaped, drop-shouldered cardigan.

But I want, instead of sleeves, to pick up stitches on the side and do an inch or so of rib. I see this cuff as being quite long (matching the beginning of the long decrease on the front).

Any hints or tips for creating a good pick up from the side of a knitted piece? I usually reckon a proportion of 3 stitches to 4 rows to accommodate the difference in length/width in stocking stitch.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cranmer's baggage

Ship's Opinionated Dame
# 1662

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I'd do a standard 'pick up and knit' - with the yarn in hand as if to knit normally, insert needle (perhaps a little finer than you'll use for the band itself) into the first stitch, bring yarn around needle knitwise, draw through. One stitch on needle. continue thusly, skipping every fourth stitch as you work your way around the armhole. If you're doing a rib band, the rib should draw it in neatly. If you were doing a garter stitch band, I'd suggest some systematic decreasing in the first row to make it sit better.

The other way to pick up stitches neatly and easily is using a crochet hook. Personally, I prefer the first option.

--------------------
Eschew obfuscation!

Posts: 1537 | From: the apple isle | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Firenze, if I wanted to pick up stitches from stocking stitch, and was going to knit the new piece in stocking stitch I would pick up 2 stitches for every 3 rows. This gives a nice smooth transition, with no puckering.

As you want to go into rib, I suggest that you pick up on stitch for every row. This should help reduce any pickering going from st st to rib, but will still produce a tighter fabric that if done in st st.

I suspect that the only way to tell for sure it to try it out and decide what looks best to you.

Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged



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