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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Dishy: the 2011 recipe thread.
Sandemaniac
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We've just made some wasabi paste from powder to go with some sushi, and found it a bit underwhelming without the addition of some soy sauce. In the absence of instructions on the pack, we made it up with tap water. Should we be using rice vinegar or similar instead? It wasn't bad, just rather less blow-your-socks-off than we expected!

AG
(who may have to buy a microwave just to try SFs fudge recipe!)

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LutheranChik
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How's everyone's holiday baking coming along?

So far we have made snickerdoodles (using a lower fat recipe -- not quite as yummy); honey-mace drops; hermits ("down east" spice cookies we amend with Michigan dried fruits inside. Next on the agenda are Russian tea cakes (the kids are clamoring for these -- they're just round, nut-studded shortbreads rolled in powdered sugar), peanut blossoms (soft peanut cookies with a chocolate kiss pressed into the middle). If I have time I might bake a pan of raspberr-oatmeal bars and chocolate-chocolate chop cookies. And of course the de rigeur sour cream cut-out cookies. This seems like a great deal of baking, but we do have five gift boxes that go cross-country, so we never wind up with cookies of our own!

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Ferdzy
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I've made a steamed date & chocolate pudding, and a light fruitcake. For cookies, rolled spice cookies with peel and ginger in them, Black Forest cookies (dark choco with white choco chips and dried cherries), and kipferl. Still debating rum balls or tutti-frutti squares.
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Moo

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# 107

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I just made a big batch of cranberry-orange bars.

Moo

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Martha
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quote:
Originally posted by Mr Curly:
quote:
Originally posted by Martha:
Mr Curly, they look delicious!

Why, thank you. Do have a go at them, and tell us how you went.

mr curly

I wish I could! Unfortunately I now live in the US, where Christmas pudding is a rare and expensive luxury. Nice as they look, I don't think I have the time right now to make my own pudding and then make it into chocolate bites.

This has already been a baking week - I have made Christmas cake (a bit late, I know), double choc cookies for a sweet treats swap, apple cinnamon muffins, lemon poppy seed muffins, and will be tackling mince pies this weekend. And our next door neighbours brought over Christmas cookies too, so we will probably die of sugar overdose sometime soon.

[ 14. December 2011, 02:21: Message edited by: Martha ]

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Roseofsharon
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Christmas cake made and iced, mince pies in the freezer. Birthday cake for grandson made, iced and consumed this past weekend.
Elder Son is making stollen as his contribution to the feasting, so I'm as done as I can be.
The lemon ginger tart which is the alternative to the (bought) Christmas pudding can't be made more than a couple of days ahead.

I have a Herman Cake 'working', which will be ready to bake on Dec 22nd, and as I doubt if anyone will want to be given a starter to look after over Christmas I will cook up all but the portion I will need to start the next one.
Might make another batch of mincepies if I feel festive enough before The Day.

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Welease Woderwick

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Not baking but last night we cooked up a batch of home made toasted muesli - hardly rocket science but still took a while. HWMBO chopped almonds whilst I attended to other delights - and we bought broken cashew pieces as they are cheaper than whole cashews, which we would have had to chop anyway. As HWMBO and our visiting Hell Host are both diabetic this should be more acceptable as we added zero sugar.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Here is my recipe for cranberry-orange bars

Cranberry-orange bars

1 orange*
1 c. dried cranberries
1/2 c. butter
1 granulated sugar
1egg
2 c. sifted flour
1/2 teasp. baking powder
1/4 teasp. salt
2 c. sifted confectioner's sugar

Squeeze 3 tablespoons of juice from the orange to use for the frosting. Cut remaining orange into pieces and put into a food processor. Process till smooth. Add cranberries and chop them. Set aside.

Cream butter and sugar. Add egg and mix.. Add dry ingredients and mix thoroughly. Add orange-cranberry and stir until thoroughly combined.

Put into a non-stick or greased 10" x 15" pan and bake for about twenty-five minutes. Combine confectioner's sugar and reserved orange juice. Spread on warm bars.


*If you use a juice orange, make sure you get rid of all the seeds. If you use a navel orange, discard the navel part because it may have very bitter pieces of rind in it. If the white pith between the rind and the pulp is very thick, peel the orange with a vegetable peeler, then peel off and discard the pith.

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See you later, alligator.

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Piglet
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WW, your toasted muesli sounds interesting, but surely it needs sweetening with something? Honey? Splenda (or whatever your equivalent non-sugar-sugar is)?

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Lothlorien
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quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
WW, your toasted muesli sounds interesting, but surely it needs sweetening with something? Honey? Splenda (or whatever your equivalent non-sugar-sugar is)?

If there's fruit in it, it has sweetening already. I eat untoasted, unsweetened muesli with dried fruit and it's quite sweet. I put frozen raspberries on top but don't use extra sugar either.

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infinite_monkey
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I planned a cookie exchange for last night, but then got the flu and had to cancel the darn thing.

These cookies would have been my contribution:
Almond Spice Cookies

They are truly delicious--somehow more than the sum of their parts.

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His light was lifted just above the Law,
And now we have to live with what we did with what we saw.

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rugasaw
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Moo, I was watching foodtv today and the Pioneer Woman made blackberry cobbler. I seem to remember making something similar from a recipe you posted some years ago. I thought you would want to know your recipe for fruit pudding has been changed to cobbler and got famous.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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Moo

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The difference between my fruit pudding and a cobbler is that my fruit pudding has batter on the bottom, then the fruit, then boiling liquid. The batter has a very large amount of baking powder, and this makes the batter rise and enclose the fruit and liquid.

A cobbler has fruit on the bottom and dough or batter on the top.

My pudding is less work than a cobbler, and I think it tastes better.

Moo

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Anna B
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quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
How's everyone's holiday baking coming along?

I'm doing the baking this coming week. This is what's on the agenda.

kolachky, chocolate-chip bars, Anna's orange-molasses Christmas crackles, pecan bars, spritzen

cakes: almond cake, kransekake, Mor Monsen (a Norwegian lemon cake topped with currants, almonds, and pearl sugar)

breads: julebrod, limpa rye, lefse, Danish pastry

candies: Anna's sugarplums, nougat

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rugasaw
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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
The difference between my fruit pudding and a cobbler is that my fruit pudding has batter on the bottom, then the fruit, then boiling liquid. The batter has a very large amount of baking powder, and this makes the batter rise and enclose the fruit and liquid.

A cobbler has fruit on the bottom and dough or batter on the top.

My pudding is less work than a cobbler, and I think it tastes better.

Moo

That is the thing is I don't think her cobbler is really a cobbler. She puts the fruit on top and lets the batter surround it.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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Just Me
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quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
Next on the agenda are Russian tea cakes (the kids are clamoring for these -- they're just round, nut-studded shortbreads rolled in powdered sugar)

I think that must be what I ate earlier this evening. They were new to me - and now I know what they were! Aren't coincidences wonderful?

J

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Piglet
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Following on from a discussion in the British thread in AS:

Red Pepper Jelly

2 large red bell peppers, de-seeded and chopped
1 cup white vinegar
4½ cups sugar
1 envelope Certo liquid pectin

Heat 5 1-cup jars in a 100ºC oven for about 10 minutes

Puree the chopped peppers with the vinegar (I use one of those little food-processors that you operate by turning a handle on top). In a large pot, mix the pureed mixture and sugar, stirring well.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat and continue to boil for ten minutes, stirring often.

Remove from the heat, add the pectin, and stir again.

Return to the heat, bring to a rapid rolling boil and boil for one minute, stirring constantly.

Remove from the heat, fill the heated jars and cover with heated lids. Serve spread on Philly cheese as a dip with crackers.

Note to Brits: I'd never heard of Certo pectin until I moved to Canada (probably because I'd never preserved anything ... [Big Grin] ); I don't know if it's available in the UK or if you can get something similar under a different name.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
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Lothlorien
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quote:
I don't know if it's available in the UK or if you can get something similar under a different name.

Probably Jamsetta down here. I saw some in the supermarket the other day. Haven't used it for years.

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Ferdzy
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I've always made my pepper jellies without any pectin and they set just fine. You can omit it.
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Keren-Happuch

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No, it's definitely Certo on this side of the Pond. I've never made jam, but my Grandma did and my Mum does.

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rugasaw
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I made the Pioneer Woman's blackberry "cobbler" yesterday for a caroling party. I can say it is delicious but I think it is much closer to Moo's pudding than to a traditional cobbler.

While we were carolin I got to wondering what is figgy pudding?

[ 19. December 2011, 12:10: Message edited by: rugasaw ]

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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Jengie jon

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Here from the Beeb so it must be correct or they would have "Annoyed of Ashton" writing into complain.

Jengie

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Penny S
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They did a figgy pudding on the country programme on BBC 1 yesterday, but I missed it.

Penny

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
They did a figgy pudding on the country programme on BBC 1 yesterday, but I missed it.

Penny

I watched it with the eye that wasn't on my knitting, and it certainly had real suet (I saw it being grated by Gerard, the food historian from last summer's Hairy Bikers series), chopped up figs (but I didn't notice if they were dried or fresh), chopped crystalised ginger and fresh breadcrumbs. Don't know what else went into it when I was counting stitches.
I was disappointed that we didn't get to see the Coventry God Cakes being made..

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
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What in the world is "vegetarian suet" per the BBC Figgy Pudding recipe?

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Martha
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We had a mince pie and mulled wine party yesterday and I made ravioli-style mince pies as per Delia's recipe. The pastry is amazing and it's a lot easier than making little pies, especially when you don't have the appropriate tins!
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ken
Ship's Roundhead
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
What in the world is "vegetarian suet" per the BBC Figgy Pudding recipe?

A kind of solidified vegetable oil available very cheaply from any supermarket, used in baking and so on, as a substitute for suet or lard. Lard being soft fat from cows or sheep, typically sold in blocks wrapped in paper like butter, suet the harder fat from the back and kidneys which is be dried out and shredded and sold in packets of little bits, sort of like pellets of hard fat.

[ 19. December 2011, 18:19: Message edited by: ken ]

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
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... so my memory told me but Wikipedia tells me that lard is only pig fat ...

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Ariel
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quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
We've just made some wasabi paste from powder to go with some sushi, and found it a bit underwhelming without the addition of some soy sauce. In the absence of instructions on the pack, we made it up with tap water. Should we be using rice vinegar or similar instead? It wasn't bad, just rather less blow-your-socks-off than we expected!

It is supposed to be made with water but it's usually a bit milder than the actual thing. You're better off with either the fresh root if you can get it, or adding a little mustard to your powder which is what some of the manufacturers of the ready-made stuff do (and then I'm told they add a touch of green food colouring to get it to the right shade).

I generally just buy a tube of it if I want any - the Chinese supermarket on Hythe Bridge St has a Japanese section with such things in it.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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Here's something exciting to do with an egg.

Finely slice peppers and onions and dice up a chili (I used half a Scotch Bonnet) and saute in olive oil. Add cumin, thyme, a little sugar and some tomatoes. When it is all nicely soft and melty, clear a space and break an egg into it. Cook to taste.

It goes oddly well with fishcakes.

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Roseofsharon
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Lard is definitely pig fat.
Being from a family spread out between Dudley and the northern edge of Birmingham I was brought up on pig-products. Bread and lard was a favourite after-school snack. Preferably flead lard, on crusty white bread generously sprinkled with salt and pepper.
It was nearly as good as my mothers home-made faggots of minced pork offal wrapped in pig's caul (or kell, as she called it)
[Smile]

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ken
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Yes, I forgot. Lard and suet are a small part of my life these days. In fact for the last forty years. I almost never do deep frying at home, I rarely cook pastry or puddings, and my default cooking fats are olive oil and butter.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Anna B
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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Lard and suet are a small part of my life these days.

This statement has a strange plaintive quality. Is it perhaps a long-lost O Antiphon?

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fletcher christian

Mutinous Seadog
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O tasty goodness thats soooo wrong; Lard and suet are a lost part of my life these days O Lord. Renew the fatness on the wheels of your chariot to carry me to Elijah's land.

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rugasaw
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# 7315

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How long does the figgy pudding last before going bad? I have heard of people saving these things for months before serving.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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LutheranChik
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It's after 10 pm here and I'm still making Christmas cookies...I think we have 8 kinds. I ran out of time to make gingersnaps, cookies I personally enjoy, but I don't think that the kids appreciate spice cookies that much. They're all into peanut butter and chocolate, so those are the dominant flavors...with a batch of iced sour cream sugar cookies, benne wafers (sesame seed butter cookies), hermit cookies with dried Michigan fruits (apple, cherries and blueberries) and raspberry oatmeal bars.

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
How long does the figgy pudding last before going bad? I have heard of people saving these things for months before serving.

Don't know exactly what you mean but our Christmas puddings are usually made in September. A week ago we had a pudding left over from last year's 'crop' so it must have been at least 14 months old. With all that sugar, dried fruit and brandy in, they keep well if they are wrapped up and left in a cold dark place.

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
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Dunno about figs - not very English sounding! - but it was traditional to make Christmas pudding on the Twenty-Fifth Sunday after Trinity. So it gets a minimum of five weeks to develop its flavour.

And it wasn't that unusual - or wasn't until recently - to make next year's Christmas pudding this year, and hang it in a cool, dry, place. So sometimes the pudding mixed on "stir up Sunday" was to be eaten in thirteen months, not one month.

quote:

Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works, may of thee be plenteously rewarded; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

One of those bits of liturgy that doesn't work so well in Latin [Biased]

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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rugasaw
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# 7315

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Thanks Sioni Sais and Ken that is what I wanted to know.

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Treat the earth well, It was not given to you by your parents. It was loaned to you by your children. -Unknown

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georgiaboy
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# 11294

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Advice/opinions requested:

I have just, after much searching, found my late aunt's recipe for Apple Butter. Her directions are to place the mixture in a cold oven, set temp to 250 degrees, and cook, covered, 'until done.'

I'm thinking of trying this in a small batch in a crock-pot on the low setting. Do you think this will work?

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You can't retire from a calling.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
I'm thinking of trying this in a small batch in a crock-pot on the low setting. Do you think this will work?

It's certainly worth trying.

Moo

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See you later, alligator.

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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Just don't forget this handy advice from Meg the Red. [Smile]

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Here's a suggestion for a nice light salad to cut the heaviness of much Christmas food.

No quantities given - suit yourself for the numbers of people eating.

Watermelon sliced into reasonably chunky pieces. Don't make them small as they'll break up.

Finely sliced red onion which has been marinating in lemon or lime juice for about 30 minutes. Juice will go pink.

Chunks of good salty feta cheese which goes surprisingly well with the watermelon.**

Mix all together gently and chill.

** for those down here: I use Kebia Bulgarian sheep's milk feta with the green strip around lid. It's consistently good and fairly salty.

Watermelon is also good mixed with chopped red onion and just a drizzle of balsamic vinegar. ( [Big Grin] specially for PeteC)

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Clarence
Shipmate
# 9491

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Any suggestions on what to do with two unopened jars of fruit mince? I know it keeps, but I really don't want to leave it until next Christmas and don't think I'll be hosting a Yule party in July.

The only thing I've found so far is mixing it into softened ice cream and then refreezing.

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I scraped my knees while I was praying - Paramore

Posts: 793 | From: Over the rainbow | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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Nowt wrong with that, Clarence, says he wistfully.

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Even more so than I was before

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Zach82
Shipmate
# 3208

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quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
Any suggestions on what to do with two unopened jars of fruit mince? I know it keeps, but I really don't want to leave it until next Christmas and don't think I'll be hosting a Yule party in July.

The only thing I've found so far is mixing it into softened ice cream and then refreezing.

Why can't you bake pies between now and July?

Zach

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Don't give up yet, no, don't ever quit/ There's always a chance of a critical hit. Ghost Mice

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Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

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Clarence, nothing at all wrong with stirring them into a good ice-cream. Try a bit of simmering first in some brandy- you will need to evaporate the alcohol as otherwise there may be some problems in freezing properly.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Clarence, I saw this recipe for cupcakes with fruit mince added the other day. Recipe is somewhere near middle of the post and addition of mince is at end of the recipe.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Clarence
Shipmate
# 9491

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Thanks for the suggestions all - and Zach, the reason the pies aren't an option is the same reason the fruit mince was leftover: strong family 'no' on having them at Christmas at all! So it is up to FD and me to consume the fruit mince by other means.

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I scraped my knees while I was praying - Paramore

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Time to put another (different) saucepan on the stove.

Goodbye 11, welcome 12.

Firenze
Heaven Host

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged



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