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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: Cauldron Bubble: 2012 recipes
ken
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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
Any other suggestions - particularly if they are ones that add a non-sludgy texture gratefully received.

A friend of mine called Manda has been blogging various vegan cookings at The Stripey Cat

Some ideas that occured to me before I looked there and realised how boring they were by comparison:

Roast/grilled veg is still an obvious change.

Deep-fried crispy seaweed :-)

Pakoras, onion bhaji, stuffed paratha.

Chips! With or without mushy peas.

Cornmeal/ugali/polenta - OK, it goes with splodge, but its cheap, easy, and different - and you can grill or fry it the next day to make a crunchy biscuity thing.

Turkish bread stuffed with olives! Bread and olives in general. Fried bread. Toast!

Imam bayaldi, a stuffed aubergine recipe famous from Turkey.

Stir-fried all sorts of stuff. Can make it colourful with peppers and cucumber and tomatoes and green beans (not exactly in season though). Tofu with spring onions, ginger, and peanuts. Etc etc.

But look at that website. Some goood stuff there.

[ 06. February 2012, 14:20: Message edited by: ken ]

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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ElaineC
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I have one daughter who is vegan as an ethical choice and the other for medical reasons.

I find this cookery book useful.

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Music is the only language in which you cannot say a mean or sarcastic thing. John Erskine

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:

With "red pepper" I wasn't sure if you meant a bell pepper or a chili pepper, so I put both in [Biased] Well, in my case the second one was an African piri piri, and I'm glad I did! The recipe definitely needs that "zing".

It's a bell pepper. I find that a good tablespoon of paprika (usually a spanish smoked one) gives that casserole enough 'zing' for my taste. But I am a wimp, and don't like much chilli heat.

We're having another chunk of the same pumpkin tonight, roasted with red onions, served over green lentils and topped with goats cheese.
I had to go out in the snow to pick rosemary for it, as there was none in the house [Frown]

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:

It's a bell pepper. I find that a good tablespoon of paprika (usually a spanish smoked one) gives that casserole enough 'zing' for my taste. But I am a wimp, and don't like much chilli heat.

[Frown]

Chile or paprika isn't a one or t'other thing. In some chili dishes it's no bad thing to 'round-out' the chili with a little paprika. A teaspoon or even half-of one does a good job.

[ 07. February 2012, 12:10: Message edited by: Sioni Sais ]

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Sioni Sais
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Dang! Misattributed quote there.

It should have been to RoseofSharon, not LeRoc.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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LutheranChik
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The other day I saw the greatest idea for a salad...can't wait to try it. It's consists of a cooked lasagna noodle spread with shredded mozzarella (better yet the rolled fresh mozz)and fresh basil leaves, rolled up, then drizzled with a vinaigrette dressing. I can see all sorts of interesting variations on this theme.

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Simul iustus et peccator
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Piglet
Islander
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Hmmm ... not quite sure about the lasagne noodle, but the whole thing reminds me a bit of one of the nicest starters I've ever had in a restaurant: slices of mozzarella, tomato and avocado drizzled with lovely herby vinaigrette.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Siegfried
Ship's ferret
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Bit late on the butternut squash, but you can steam it, mash it, and use it in place of pumpkin (or sweet potato) in a pie.

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Siegfried
Life is just a bowl of cherries!

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LutheranChik
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We had "Bombay sliders" last night...these had originally been intended for Superbowl Sunday, but we decided to give them their own meal. (Pond translation: A slider is a miniature hamburger, or really any kind of miniature sandwich using a small roll as a bun. They got their start as extremely cheap and greasy little workingmen's sammies, topped with fried onions, that...well...slid right down one's gullet and beyond.)

For the burgers: A pound of lean ground pork or turkey; 1 TBS freshly grated ginger; 2TBS or so fresh cilantro (coriander); a heaping teaspoon of cumin; a couple of teaspoons of curry powder; a teaspoon of either hot paprika or chili powder (we used ancho chili powder because that's what we have on hand) 2 green onions, sliced; about a tablespoon and a half of plain yogurt (I used zero-fat Greek yogurt.) These are just made into small patties, half the size of a regular burger, and pan-fried.

For the sauce: About a 1:1 ratio of light mayonnaise and plain yogurt (I used more yogurt to lighten things up); half again as much ketchup; curry powder and finely minced garlic to taste.

I put the burgers on small dinner rolls that had been warmed; put some of the sauce on top; added a slice of tomato and a couple slices of English cucumber.

We really, really liked these, and thought they were well worth the fuss with all the seasonings, even though I had a lot of leftover sauce. (Repurposeable in an egg or tuna salad, I think.)

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Simul iustus et peccator
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infinite_monkey
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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
I've gone vegan for February. I foresee a month of variations of vegetable+pulse sludge (curry, stew, casserole) on rice/potato/pasta. I can mix this up a bit with Chinese (I like tofu).

Any other suggestions - particularly if they are ones that add a non-sludgy texture gratefully received.

101 Cookbooks

At least half the recipes are initially vegan, and most of the others can be tweaked. Heidi Swanson is a culinary mastermind: her recipes are simple, clean, healthy, and freaking delicious.

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His light was lifted just above the Law,
And now we have to live with what we did with what we saw.

--Dar Williams, And a God Descended
Obligatory Blog Flog: www.otherteacher.wordpress.com

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Palimpsest
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quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
Somebody gave me a bag of butternut squash, already cut into small pieces.

What do I do with them? [Confused]

Toss in a pan
Sprinkle with olive oil.
Roast till brown
salt and perhaps nutmeg

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Palimpsest
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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
I've gone vegan for February. I foresee a month of variations of vegetable+pulse sludge (curry, stew, casserole) on rice/potato/pasta. I can mix this up a bit with Chinese (I like tofu).

Any other suggestions - particularly if they are ones that add a non-sludgy texture gratefully received. I'm not really into fake meat products though. And it's cold here so I can't exist in salads.

(I don't dislike the variations on sludge but I think I might get bored of it.)

Breaded and Fried Eggplant with tomato sauce
Baked Large Onions stuffed with chopped onion and parsley and whole wheat bread cubes
French Fries

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ken
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For the veg cooking, if we're onto cookery books, I have to yet again recommend Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book, probably the best cookery book in the English language.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Yangtze
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Thank you for the blog and book suggestions. That blog looks fantastic.

Ken, I thought I had Grigson's Vegetable book but looking around I can only spot her English Food and Fish books. May have to buy it.

Mmm, don't think I've ever had stuffed onion. How exactly do you stuff it? I mean it's not hollow like a pepper. Do you cut out the middle bit? It does sound rather good vis-a-vis not being sludge!

I've mainly been eating variations of stuff on rice (whether slushy or stir-fry) but they've been tasty. Have posted a couple of them on my blog - see sig.

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organic cotton, fair trade cotton, linen

Sometimes I wonder What's for Afters?

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Lyda*Rose

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
For the veg cooking, if we're onto cookery books, I have to yet again recommend Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book, probably the best cookery book in the English language.

Thanks, ken. I just ordered a used copy through Amazon US. I've been meaning to. I'll see how "good" the copy is. I might add the Kindle edition although I'm not sure I want my Kindle around my sloshy kitchen ways. [Paranoid]

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Dormouse

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We have just eaten a wonderful warm salad... I mention it on my blog (see sig) but it was basically roasted squash at room temp, mixed with crumbled blue chese, fried mushroms, rocket, and big crunchy croutons. All mixed with a balsamic vinegar vinaigrette. Delicious!

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What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
For the veg cooking, if we're onto cookery books, I have to yet again recommend Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book, probably the best cookery book in the English language.

With the sea bream tonight we had her Fennel with Parmesan, which, as she says, is the best thing you can do with it.
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Lothlorien
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quote:
Thanks, ken. I just ordered a used copy through Amazon US. I've been meaning to. I'll see how "good" the copy is. I might add the Kindle edition although I'm not sure I want my Kindle around my sloshy kitchen ways.

Do you have a link to the Kindle edition please? I'd like to see a price etc. I've looked on both US and UK sites although down here we can't buy from UK site. Can't see it on either. New and used paper copies available but no Kindle from my viewpoint here.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Lyda*Rose

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Erm. I think I got the wrong book. I got Vegetables by Jane Grigson instead of The Jane Grigson Vegetable Book specified by ken. Here's the Kindle link for Vegetables but no, they don't seem to have Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book on Kindle yet.

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Lothlorien
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Thanks for double checking. I know I can't buy from Amazon UK, but thought link should have been on both sites. Have now ordered from another site, (now Amazon in disguise). They are usually very prompt so hopefully it will be down here soon.

Like I need another cookbook! [Hot and Hormonal]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Palimpsest
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quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
The other day I saw the greatest idea for a salad...can't wait to try it. It's consists of a cooked lasagna noodle spread with shredded mozzarella (better yet the rolled fresh mozz)and fresh basil leaves, rolled up, then drizzled with a vinaigrette dressing. I can see all sorts of interesting variations on this theme.

To tie two themes together with some Mark Bitman ideas.
You can do a faux squash/pumpkin raviolie by layering cooked mashed squash and pasta sheets.

He also has a great idea. Make a grilled cheese sandwich, cut it into one inch squares, use as croutons in a tossed green salad with vinaigrette.

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Palimpsest
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quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:

Mmm, don't think I've ever had stuffed onion. How exactly do you stuff it? I mean it's not hollow like a pepper. Do you cut out the middle bit? It does sound rather good vis-a-vis not being sludge!

It's from Mark Bitman's How to cook everything vegetarian which has a ton of great ideas, although many are not vegan. His stuffed onions had a mozzarella topping, but the soy stuff didn't really work out.

You can blanch the onions, or just hollow them with knife and spoon. Chop the extracted onion and mix some of it into the bread stuffing. The whole baked onion does have a nice solid texture.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Erm. I think I got the wrong book. I got Vegetables by Jane Grigson instead of The Jane Grigson Vegetable Book specified by ken. Here's the Kindle link for Vegetables but no, they don't seem to have Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book on Kindle yet.

I see the linked book is by Sophie Grigson, Jane's daughter. I have several of hers, of which the best is Sophie's Table . In fact, I will be doing the braised duck legs from it for dinner tomorrow.
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Surfing Madness
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I like making pizza, and experimenting with different toppings. Was just wondering if anyone had any advice on how to make/ where to buy the BBQ sauce that you can sometimes get on bought pizzas (instead of tomato)? Thanks

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I now blog about all my crafting! http://inspiredbybroadway.blogspot.co.uk

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Lyda*Rose

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Erm. I think I got the wrong book. I got Vegetables by Jane Grigson instead of The Jane Grigson Vegetable Book specified by ken. Here's the Kindle link for Vegetables but no, they don't seem to have Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book on Kindle yet.

I see the linked book is by Sophie Grigson, Jane's daughter. I have several of hers, of which the best is Sophie's Table . In fact, I will be doing the braised duck legs from it for dinner tomorrow.
Erm. Doh!

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
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I had a hankering for healthy Indian food, and consequently remembered a mucho tasty vegan recipe I'd forgotten about (pulses but not mush):

Ingredients:
1 tin chick peas
1/2 onion
piece of root ginger (about 1 inch)
1 round tsp cumin seeds
1 level tsp coriander seeds
1/2 tsp cloves
1/2 tsp cinnamon
bit of grated nutmeg
1 spoon tomato paste

Finely chop the onion and ginger. Leave the cumin seeds whole and grind all the other spices. Open the chick peas and drain about half the liquid out of the tin.

Heat a bit of vegetable oil and add the cumin seeds until they pop. Soften the onion and ginger then add the other spices. Add the chick peas (plus the liquid that's still left) and the tomato paste. Put on a lid and cook for about 10 minutes until the chick peas have softened a bit.

Serve with chapati.

You can use chilli in this recipe but personally I think it overpowers the other spices too much. The ginger already gives it a little kick.

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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Emma Louise

Storm in a teapot
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I posted on the question thread too. Its sort of a recipe... but for finger paint!(sugar, salt, corn starch, water).

However googling tells me that corn starch and corn flour (what we have in the UK) are quite different products. Friend suggested potato starch instead but I haven't even heard of that...

Any ideas what I should use? Thanks [Smile] (oh and what is the difference in everyday language?)

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Martha
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As far as I'm aware corn starch (US) and cornflour (UK) are the same thing - that fine white powder that you use for thickening gravy etc. What you don't want to use is cornmeal, which is yellow and coarse and used for making polenta or cornbread. As I understand it the latter is the whole corn (as in sweetcorn) grain ground up, the former is just the inner part.

I definitely know people in the UK who have made finger paint kind of things with UK cornflour and it has worked.

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Lyda*Rose

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I can tell Lent is on: nobody has been inquiring here lately about eating fancy. Or anything at all. [Biased]

I have a question about food that would fit in with some people's Lent. Has anyone experimented with different cheeses than cheddar in mac 'n cheese? I've found myself a little burned out on California cheddar-style cheese, but cheese being as expensive as it can be, I'd like to hear some suggestions before going to Trader Joe's. I tend to like more of a sharp taste than a bland, creamy taste on pasta.

Thanks. [Smile]

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Marvin the Martian

Interplanetary
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Has anyone experimented with different cheeses than cheddar in mac 'n cheese? I've found myself a little burned out on California cheddar-style cheese, but cheese being as expensive as it can be, I'd like to hear some suggestions before going to Trader Joe's. I tend to like more of a sharp taste than a bland, creamy taste on pasta.

Here in the UK I'd just say "buy some really strong cheddar", but I don't know what the availability is like over there.

I love putting halloumi in pasta dishes, you might try that? Make sure to fry it a little before it goes in.

Alternatively, some mozzarella sliced and laid over the top of a pasta dish with some breadcrumbs (add herbs if desired - we do desire [Smile] ) and left in the oven just long enough for it to melt works beautifully - it's not a sharp taste, but it is tasty.

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Hail Gallaxhar

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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Gruyere? It melts well (it's a foundational fondue cheese) and is tasty.
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Lyda*Rose

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I think English cheddars would be more interesting than our milder US stuff. Those might be found at Trader Joe's. Halloumi sounds really interesting, but I don't think I've seen it out here in Calif. If I see it, I'll try it. (Fried cheese- yum!) I do like mozzarella, but I like it as a counterpoint to stronger flavors like sausage and herbs. Now gruyere is a cheese I overlooked. That seems like something to try.

Thanks, guys!

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Marvin the Martian

Interplanetary
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Halloumi sounds really interesting, but I don't think I've seen it out here in Calif. If I see it, I'll try it. (Fried cheese- yum!)

If you get it right, it's fabulous. Almost meaty in texture - it's no word of a lie that the first time I tried it, I thought I was eating chicken!

The pasta dish we have it with is pasta (penne or conchigli are our favourites), a jar of white pasta sauce (carbonara, say), bacon, mushrooms and halloumi. We fry up the bacon before cutting it into pieces, then chop the mushrooms and halloumi and fry them in the same pan so that the bacon fat gives them a nice crispness. Once the pasta's ready, chuck the lot into the saucepan until the sauce warms up fully and serve with jalapeno chillis to taste. Gorgeous!

We have this at least every other week [Big Grin]

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Hail Gallaxhar

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Mr Clingford
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# 7961

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quote:
Originally posted by Marvin the Martian:
quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Halloumi sounds really interesting, but I don't think I've seen it out here in Calif. If I see it, I'll try it. (Fried cheese- yum!)

If you get it right, it's fabulous.
...The pasta dish we have it with is pasta (penne or conchigli are our favourites), a jar of white pasta sauce (carbonara, say), bacon, mushrooms and halloumi. We fry up the bacon before cutting it into pieces, then chop the mushrooms and halloumi and fry them in the same pan so that the bacon fat gives them a nice crispness. Once the pasta's ready, chuck the lot into the saucepan until the sauce warms up fully and serve with jalapeno chillis to taste. Gorgeous!

We have this at least every other week [Big Grin]

I'll see what my Emily thinks of this! Add a courgette or a salad and a bottle of wine and it sounds perfect.

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Ne'er cast a clout till May be out.

If only.

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BalddudePeekskill
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# 12152

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I have a cheat when I only have some blandish cheddar but want a sharper taste---I add in pecorino romano. You get the creaminess of the cheddar with a nice tangy bite. I have also added in a bit of cream cheese to the mac and cheese mixture at times. Really lovely!

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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My standard is now to run together macaroni and cauliflower cheese - makes for a lighter and more interesting dish. I use a strong cheddar and a good tsp of grain mustard in the sauce, and, if going really berserk, chopped pancetta, breadcrumb and grated cheese in the topping.
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georgiaboy
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# 11294

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I don't ordinarily do 'mac and cheese' as such, but for a grits casserole which calls for cheddar I usually add a quantity of a 'blue,' (not my best Stilton unless I'm feeling really prodigal!)
I always use the sharpest Cheddar I can get, but the piquant flavor of the blue adds the spark that kicks it off, as least for me.

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John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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If you're making a cheese sauce and the cheese is "cheddar-type" and a little bland, a teaspoon or two of dry mustard (what we in Canada call English mustard -- not the seeds, but the ground powder) works wonders. As does a little nutmeg ground in. Or a little cayenne.

John

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
My standard is now to run together macaroni and cauliflower cheese - makes for a lighter and more interesting dish. I use a strong cheddar and a good tsp of grain mustard in the sauce, and, if going really berserk, chopped pancetta, breadcrumb and grated cheese in the topping.

Yes, this is our favourite too, although bacon instead of pancetta. Broccoli works too, as do any combination of peas, sweetcorn, mushrooms and fried onions.

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Nea Fox

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Latchkey Kid
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# 12444

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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Halloumi sounds really interesting, but I don't think I've seen it out here in Calif. If I see it, I'll try it. (Fried cheese- yum!)

I do halloumi to accompany Mediterranean vegetables, which also works well as a vegetarian BBQ.

The other way I have found to prepare it is to place cubes of it in boiling water for a few minutes. That goes well as part of an antipasto.

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Gee D
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# 13815

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Halloumi is readily available here, being sold even in supermarkets. It really does need to be cooked and probably the most common method at a domestic level is to slice it, sear each side on a bbq hotplate and then to serve it hot as part of a mezze platter. At cafes, it can come as a light vegetarian meal, sliced and on a tossed salad., or again as apart of a platter.

Sometimes, I've had it sliced more thickly, a pocket cut into the side and filled with herbs - especially dried mint - and cooked more slowly so that the heat goes right through. Healthy and delicious.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Haloumi, fried, cubes of roasted pumpkin or sweet potato, pine nuts, lots of rocket and a dressing of lemon juice and oil makes a great summer lunch. with some homemade bread or rolls.

Have you thought of a bit of something like a good gorgonzola in the macaroni cheese. A different flavour to the same old.

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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More good advice! [Cool]

There's an independent store a few towns over which might carry halloumi if Trader Joe's doesn't. Marvin's pasta recipe sounds like a winner as does the cheese plus watermelon. And thanks, all for the other suggestions.

I do use dried mustard in my mac and cheese and it does perk up the taste. Pecorino romano sounds like a tasty addition to the mac for my taste. I'm not sure about the blue cheese. I like it with other strong flavors and especially in cobb salad. Not too sure about mac. But I won't rule it out.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Had the feeling this morning that I have not seen a vitamin in days, so I fired up the juicer.

Fresh pineapple, red grape, kiwi fruit and lime.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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We're still having Adventures with a Breadmaking Machine, but when we make loaves with ordinary flour and following a recipe (as opposed to "bread-kit" flour where you just add water) they seem to come out a wee bit heavy.

The only departure we've made from the recipe is that we used olive oil rather than vegetable oil (it's what we had in the house) - is that likely to have made a difference? Advice would be welcome.

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Palimpsest
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# 16772

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quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
We're still having Adventures with a Breadmaking Machine, but when we make loaves with ordinary flour and following a recipe (as opposed to "bread-kit" flour where you just add water) they seem to come out a wee bit heavy.

The only departure we've made from the recipe is that we used olive oil rather than vegetable oil (it's what we had in the house) - is that likely to have made a difference? Advice would be welcome.

I'm not a bread machine expert but did you add sugar and are you using all purpose or bread flour rather than pastry flour? (The terms may vary in U.K.)
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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My bread machine specifies olive oil (probbly because the loaves using oil instead of butter come under the heading 'Italian').

I'm assuming strong flour, otherwise your bread wouldn't work at all, so that leaves the yeast...

My suggestion would be to add an incy-wincy bit more that the recipe states. My usual loaf is 400g of flour to three-quarters of a tsp of yeast - but what I add is more like seven-eighths. The worst that can happen is air bubbles.

[ 14. March 2012, 07:46: Message edited by: Firenze ]

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
We're still having Adventures with a Breadmaking Machine, but when we make loaves with ordinary flour and following a recipe (as opposed to "bread-kit" flour where you just add water) they seem to come out a wee bit heavy.

Around here I can buy King Arthur flour made especially for bread machines. If you can't find special bread machine flour, you can add vital gluten to ordinary flour. I use vital gluten when I am making 100% whole wheat bread.

ETA: Vital gluten is not the same as vital gluten flour, even if someone in a store tries to tell you it is. I learned this the hard way.

Moo

[ 14. March 2012, 12:55: Message edited by: Moo ]

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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The flour is what here in Canada is called "all-purpose" flour, which was specified in the recipes. The loaves smell and taste quite yeasty, so we didn't think it was too little yeast. The one I made yesterday tasted fine, but still seemed rather heavy for its size, and didn't rise the way the bread-kit ones did.

I don't suppose a pinch of baking-soda or baking-powder would be the answer? Are they added to bread-kit flour?

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Latchkey Kid
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# 12444

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All-purpose sounds like a mixture of hard and soft wheat.
Hard is better as the gluten holds the structure from kneading and rises better with yeast.
I wouldn't mix in any bicarb (and acid) or baking powder as I think their rising will be finished and lost long before the yeast rising. I would rather double the amount of yeast.

Soda bread is made with baking soda or powder and soft wheat. It was traditionally made in Ireland where they grow/grew soft wheat. Australian damper is a soda bread.

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'You must never give way for an answer. An answer is always the stretch of road that's behind you. Only a question can point the way forward.'
Mika; in Hello? Is Anybody There?, Jostein Gaardner

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