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Source: (consider it) Thread: MW: Bizarre Practices The Second: Protestants
Pre-cambrian
Shipmate
# 2055

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AbundantJoy: you thought that the Anglican view on priests and the eucharist was a bit strict. I suppose every church has its bits of strictness.

An earlier part of this thread was discussing how some of the more extreme Scottish presbyterian groups are very particular about whom you mix with. And I'm sure that many Protestants are very strict about alcohol (although my brother is an elder or something in some sort of free church which doesn't seem to have any effect at all on his alcohol consumption). The comments about ribena and grape juice remind me that the canons of the Church of England require that the fermentedjuice of the grape must be used for communion.

You asked about the difference between AC and regular catholic (by which I expect you mean Roman Catholic). There are plenty of others on these message boards better equipped than I to say and there is a "What is Anglo-Catholicism" thread, although I couldn't find it just now - and it probably doesn't answer such fundamental questions.

However, for what it's worth, a Roman Catholic is obviously a member of that church and a follower of the Pope. An Anglo-Catholic is a member of an Anglican church (CofE or ECUSA) who follows in the footsteps of the C19th Oxford Movement of renewal in the CofE, which emphasised the catholic, ritualistic heritage of Anglicanism. They're also often quite conservative theologically. If you want to taste high church ritual (incense/vestments/precise movements) done properly nowadays, forget the Romans and try out an AC church.

(Actually this is not necessarily a new phenomenon: it was said in 1876 of St Barnabas in Oxford, which I used to know well, "The poor humble Roman Church hard by is quite plain, simple and Low Church in its ritual compared with St Barnabas in its festal dress on high days and holidays" For those who know Jude the Obscure, but Thomas Hardy, St Barnabas appeared as St Silas's.

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"We cannot leave the appointment of Bishops to the Holy Ghost, because no one is confident that the Holy Ghost would understand what makes a good Church of England bishop."


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LatinMan
Shipmate
# 1892

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quote:
In the Styx, you asked about 'kirk'. It is a Scots word for 'church'. I believe it is from 'kirkos' (Greek, meaning circle). The congregation used to meet in circular buildings.

Actually, I think the word "kirk" (and likewise the English "church") derives from the Greek word kyriake, an adjective meaning "the Lord's".

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* * * + * * *
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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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quote:
Originally posted by LatinMan:
Actually, I think the word "kirk" (and likewise the English "church") derives from the Greek word kyriake, an adjective meaning "the Lord's".

That was a suggestion of the etymology at
bartleby.com. However it goes on to say:

quote:
but this is most improbable, as the word existed in all the Celtic dialects long before the introduction of Greek. No doubt the word means “a circle.” The places of worship among the German and Celtic nations were always circular. (Welsh, cyrch; French, cirque; Scotch, kirk; Greek, kirk-os, etc.) Compare Anglo-Saxon circe, a church, with circol, a circle.

bb


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Reepicheep
BANNED
# 60

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meant to post this sooner.

singing "As with Gladness", as a way of "looking forward to Christmas" in kingdom season. the Local Preacher taking the service used advent and Christmas interchangeably.
It wasn't even Christ the King! Admittedly, this was in a methodist church.

Angel


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Hope
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# 81

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Louise said:
quote:
The Frees are quite different from the Free Presbyterians, if that hasn't been spelled out, and shouldn't be tarred with the same brush.
(Although they do have a few extreme people too - as the case against Donald Macleod seemed to show up)

Yes, that was why I gave the full name of the denomination I was talking about, but as you realised it didn't clarify things for anyone who didn't already know about the various groups using the words "free", "church" and "Scotland" in their names. So thanks. Oh, and thanks for the diagram as well which I'm going to need to refer to at times I think!
The guy who was above all responsible for my impression of the Free Kirk (as we all know, boys and girls, experience of one person is not a good reason for disliking any group ) was also in the Free Kirk of Scotland.

Chapelhead said:

quote:
Which of these is the "Wee Frees"?

I think it's the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, but that's only the way I've heard the phrase used. The implication when I've heard it is that Wee Frees are "stricter" than (the presumably somewhat larger) Frees.

Hope

(Sorry Angel, carry on! )

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"Why does the water glow like that?"
-"The dream magic of the sea."
-"Phosphorescent algae."


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Hooker's Trick

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# 89

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I've been reading some Reformation History, and ran across reference to parishes dispensing with chalices in favour of "communion cups".

I am sure these cannot be Elizabethan trays of the tiny glasses that we've discussed.

What, pray tell, is a Communion Cup?

HT


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Amos

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# 44

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A chalice by any other name?
Just as "new presbyter is but old priest writ large"?

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At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

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Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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quote:
Originally posted by Hooker's Trick:
What, pray tell, is a Communion Cup?

A brief history of communion cups.

Before the removal of the cup from the laity (from about the twelfth century), in the West two types of chalice were used; the celebrant's chalice and a ministerial chalice (called a scyphus), from which the laity would drink (this was necessarily larger than the celebrant's chalice and had two handles for ease of holding.

After the priest had consecrated the wine, some of it would be added to the wine already in the ministerial chalice, consecrating the whole. The laity would then drink from the ministerial chalice (which they would do standing up, sucking the wine through a silver or gold object rather like a drinking straw). In large churches several ministerial chalices might be used, each receiving a little of the wine from the consecrated chalice.

After the cup was removed from the laity the ministerial chalices were no longer used. In addition the celebrant's chalice became smaller, as it was no longer necessary to consecrate wine to add to the ministerial chalice (the celebrant's chalice was used by the celebrant alone, so could be quite small).

When the cup was returned to the laity in the Church of England after the reformation, it was found that the chalices were not big enough for practical use, so larger communion cups were made and purchased, hence the reference you have found.

Possibly, the objects we use today could more properly be called communion cups than chalices, but this may be getting into pedantry (not that that has ever stopped shipmates in the past).

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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I think what is meant by "communion cup" at least in our corner of Protestantism, is the small "shot glasses" that are passed in trays. Each tray usually has 40 or so communion cups.

This is what I grew up with, though now in my dotage I am more inclined to the common chalice as a symbol of our unity at the Table of the Lord, and breaking a single loaf rather than the little chicken pellets we usually use.

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I upped mine. Up yours.
Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?


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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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My memory though I can not trace it now is that the communion served from individual cups on a communion tray was a late 19th Century introduction with the increased concern over hygiene. I think I have stated this somewhere else on the list.

I am not blaming Victorians as I also seem to recall it originated in United States of America.

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog


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Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
I think what is meant by "communion cup" at least in our corner of Protestantism, is the small "shot glasses" that are passed in trays. Each tray usually has 40 or so communion cups.

Nowadays this is a common use of the term "communion cup", but I have no doubt that in the context that HT has come across is the term is being used for the item we would often now (incorrectly) term a chalice.

Interestingly, the 1662 BCP (and every other service book I know of) uses the correct term "cup", except in the rubric where is states

quote:
And here to lay his hand upon every vessel (be it Chalice or Flagon) in which there is any Wine to be consecrated.

This suggests to me that some parishes hadn't got round to buying a communion cup and were continuing to use the smaller chalice, replenishing it from a flagon when necessary.

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


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Hooker's Trick

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# 89

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It strikes me that some Protestant churches do not keep the seasons of the church year, so some Christians may not be observing Lent just now, and even those who are are probably not swathed in purple or sack-cloth with veiled crosses.

What do non-Lent-observing protestants do to prepare for Easter?


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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Ah, but that is where you come across the differing theology. Easter is not once a year. Every Sunday we acknowledge, remember and rejoice in Easter.

Lent is not a season, but a practise that is carried out throught all of the year. "We don't save up our sins to confess them in Lent!" "Before each service we examine ourselves, and confess our sins."

This a differnt perspective. But the major mark of Lent in Presby churches in the UK are ecumenical Lenten Study groups.

There is also a certain section of the church that seems to havefeast muddled with fast. The year before last I came out of church on Christmas morning thinking "Today of all days is when I want to rejoice and give thanks, instead I am made to feel like a miserable sinner."

I am definitely a sinner, but surely even sinners can have a chance to glorify the Lord at Christmas.

I think that the AC have quite a bit to teach us about how to feast.

bb


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Carys

Ship's Celticist
# 78

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quote:
Ah, but that is where you come across the differing theology. Easter is not once a year. Every Sunday we acknowledge, remember and rejoice in Easter.

Lent is not a season, but a practise that is carried out throught all of the year. "We don't save up our sins to confess them in Lent!" "Before each service we examine ourselves, and confess our sins."


But so do those who mark the liturgical year. It is for this reason that (in the West at least) that Sundays are not part of Lent because every Sunday is a fast day.

But the liturgical year changes the focus so that we can take things in better, because we cannot hope to include everything all the time. Or that's my perspective.

Carys

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O Lord, you have searched me and know me
You know when I sit and when I rise


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seasick

...over the edge
# 48

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quote:
Carys said:
But so do those who mark the liturgical year. It is for this reason that (in the West at least) that Sundays are not part of Lent because every Sunday is a fast day.

Surely you mean that every Sunday is a feast day . . .

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We believe there is, and always was, in every Christian Church, ... an outward priesthood, ordained by Jesus Christ, and an outward sacrifice offered therein. - John Wesley


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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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Yup Carys, I know. But HT wanted the whole Lenten-non-event thing explained. I believe it is all down to Calvanistic theology.

bb


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Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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But you don't need to be Calvinist not to do Lent. And the very early Church would not have had Lent as a general period of fasting (but the practice is very old).

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!

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Carys

Ship's Celticist
# 78

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seasick wrote
quote:
Surely you mean that every Sunday is a feast day . . .

Of course I did. That'll teach me to post when I'm not awake!

quote:
Yup Carys, I know. But HT wanted the whole Lenten-non-event thing explained. I believe it is all down to Calvanistic theology.

I know that, it was just that the way you explained it implied that those of us who do keep the liturgical year wouldn't agree with that statement, or at least that's what I inferred! Sorry, I'm sensitive on this matter having had four years of odd looks for thinking that the liturgical year is important and valuable and something to be used to the full rather than paying lip service to it because otherwise some in the congregation will moan.

Carys

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O Lord, you have searched me and know me
You know when I sit and when I rise


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sharkshooter

Not your average shark
# 1589

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quote:
What do non-Lent-observing protestants do to prepare for Easter?


Eat Cadbury Easter Creme Eggs!

But seriously, why do you have to "prepare for Easter"?

Stephen
(a protestant who does not observe Lent and really doesn't know why you need to)

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Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength, and my redeemer. [Psalm 19:14]


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Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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I used to go to a church which didn't observe the church calendar at all (well, maybe they made a special mention of Harvest and Christmas) - it all got rather samey after a while. If you go to a church which observes the church calendar and does something special to mark special days, you get a sense of rhythm to life which makes sense and marks the passing of time in a significant way. Sorry I can't describe it better than that. But Easter, when it comes, is all the more special for having observed Lent.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

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Wet Kipper
Circus Runaway
# 1654

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You know this year is the forst time I've heard mention of Sundays not counting in Lent -sound to me just like an excuse to break your fast, and go back on your word.
The fasting is less "impressive", because then you're just doing it 6 days in a row...

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- insert randomly chosen, potentially Deep and Meaningful™ song lyrics here -

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Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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quote:
Originally posted by Papa Smurf:
You know this year is the first time I've heard mention of Sundays not counting in Lent -sound to me just like an excuse to break your fast, and go back on your word.
The fasting is less "impressive", because then you're just doing it 6 days in a row...

Sundays "cannot" be fast days because they are days of celebration (of the resurrection), and clearly we have more to celebrate than to give us reason to fast. Sundays have never counted as part of Lent (at least, not since Lent has existed in the form we understand it) which is why Lent lasts for 46 days despite (in part) commemorating the 40 days Jesus spent in the wilderness. Those who observe Lent still get 40 days of fasting/abstinence.

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


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Oriel
Shipmate
# 748

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I thought Holy Week counted as a separate fast, so it`s still 40 days up to Palm Sunday?

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Unlike the link previously in my sig, I actually update my Livejournal from time to time.

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Wet Kipper
Circus Runaway
# 1654

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So how many non church, (for want of a better word) people who are familiar with the idea of fasting from something for Lent know about not fasting on a Sunday ?

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- insert randomly chosen, potentially Deep and Meaningful™ song lyrics here -

Posts: 9813 | From: further up the Hill | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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quote:
Originally posted by Oriel:
I thought Holy Week counted as a separate fast, so it`s still 40 days up to Palm Sunday?

Well, you get up to some strange things north of the border . But I'm sure that Lent is 46 days because Sunday's are not fast days, because they are celebratory (and you get bread and wine).

quote:
Originally posted by Papa Smurf:
So how many non church, (for want of a better word) people who are familiar with the idea of fasting from something for Lent know about not fasting on a Sunday ?

Not many, I imaging (especially considering the number of church people who do not know that Sunday is not a fast day). But it goves a good chance to explain the gospel when explaining why Sunday is not a fast day

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


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daisymay

St Elmo's Fire
# 1480

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Lent; growing up in C of S, I only heard of it as a strange, superstitious custom (racism against Sassenachs too).

I think the teaching was that we are to live every day in a disciplined way, and to do something 'extra', like giving up a bad habit, for just a while was not sufficient. We needed to be giving that up permanently. The only reason for giving up a legitimate pleasure would be to use the money saved to help someone in poverty.

Also, Jesus fasted completely for 40 days - if we were to fast, for a reason, like seeking God's will about something, or as an adjunct to intercessionary prayer, then we would do it, privately, but not on the way to a celebration like Easter.

Jesus fasted for a particular reason and that was all about him, not necessarily for us to copy. There is definitely an awareness that Jesus was special.

Easter Sunday is a special celebation, but it is celebrated as an extra awareness that Jesus is alive. There is no 'acting out' the Easter story, as in long services on Good Friday (not a holiday in my childhood - is it nowadays, Papa Smurf?), or any feeling of 'mourning' Jesus - after all, he's alive and that's what's important because if he'd stayed dead we wouldn't have been saved and we wouldn't have any hope ourselves.

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London
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Wet Kipper
Circus Runaway
# 1654

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quote:
Originally posted by Chapelhead:
Sunday's are not fast days, because they are celebratory (and you get bread and wine).

We don't get bread and wine every Sunday, and I'm sure ours isn't the only church not to....

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- insert randomly chosen, potentially Deep and Meaningful™ song lyrics here -


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Wet Kipper
Circus Runaway
# 1654

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And I think nowadays in most places Good Friday is taken as a holiday, but only because it is everywhere else, i.e. it is a UK Bank Holiday....

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- insert randomly chosen, potentially Deep and Meaningful™ song lyrics here -

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Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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quote:
Originally posted by Papa Smurf:
We don't get bread and wine every Sunday, and I'm sure ours isn't the only church not to....

Shame on me for forgetting my low church (Baptist) roots and making such an apparent assumption.

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


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Oriel
Shipmate
# 748

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quote:
Originally posted by Papa Smurf:
And I think nowadays in most places Good Friday is taken as a holiday, but only because it is everywhere else, i.e. it is a UK Bank Holiday....

Our University, due to a desire to have fixed term lengths, no longer necessarily corresponds the Easter holiday with Easter itself. Should Easter fall outwith the holiday, we get Easter Monday as an extra day off. Easter Monday. Not Good Friday.

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Unlike the link previously in my sig, I actually update my Livejournal from time to time.


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daisymay

St Elmo's Fire
# 1480

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Same as it used to be, Oriel. When I was at uni (St. Andrews), some of the English students were shocked/ horrified/pissed off because they didn't get Good Friday as a holiday. We had lectures, presentaions and so on just the same as every other day.

Easter Monday was definitely a major holiday, when everyone (whole families) went for a picnic and rolled dyed eggs down hills. They were very often red - don't know if any significance, or because cochineal was available, and sometimes stripy brown (onion skins tied around them while they boiled).

And in C of S, we didn't have communion necessarily either on Easter Sunday.

The Baptist church I later joined had 7am Easter Sunday service with comunion as the after-service. That was a wonderful praise service.

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London
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Lovely Doggie
Shipmate
# 2218

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Picking up on one or two things . . .

In my presbyterian congregation until about 10 years ago all the elders (who were at that time of course also all men) wore tail coats to dispense communion.

And, re the general restrictivness of the Free Church of Scotland: I had a free friend who told me I ought not to be wearing trousers since these were male attire. I tried to point out to him that since mine had a side zip and a 25 inch inside leg that they could hardly be for any man, but he wasn't having it.

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And I'm thinking how good it would be to be here some day on a ship called Dignity


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babybear
Bear faced and cheeky with it
# 34

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[a little tangent]
The CofS has had female elders since 1968 (the same year they started ordaining females as ministers).
[/tangent]

bb


Posts: 13287 | From: Cottage of the 3 Bears (and The Gremlin) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Astro
Shipmate
# 84

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quote:
I had a free friend who told me I ought not to be wearing trousers since these were male attire. I tried to point out to him that since mine had a side zip and a 25 inch inside leg that they could hardly be for any man, but he wasn't having it.

You should have got him a pair of the same for him to wear to church

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if you look around the world today – whether you're an atheist or a believer – and think that the greatest problem facing us is other people's theologies, you are yourself part of the problem. - Andrew Brown (The Guardian)


Posts: 2723 | From: Chiltern Hills | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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quote:
Originally posted by Lovely Doggie:

And, re the general restrictivness of the Free Church of Scotland: I had a free friend who told me I ought not to be wearing trousers since these were male attire. I tried to point out to him that since mine had a side zip and a 25 inch inside leg that they could hardly be for any man, but he wasn't having it.


Rhetorical question (I am musing.....) if the church is so restrictive, why is it called a 'free' church???

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.


Posts: 34566 | From: Cream Tealand | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hooker's Trick

Admin Emeritus and Guardian of the Gin
# 89

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Tail coat as in white tie and tails, or do you mean a frock coat?
Posts: 6735 | From: Gin Lane | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Wet Kipper
Circus Runaway
# 1654

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Chorister - because they are no longer associated with the Church of Scotland - they have become "free"

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- insert randomly chosen, potentially Deep and Meaningful™ song lyrics here -

Posts: 9813 | From: further up the Hill | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cosmo
Shipmate
# 117

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quote:
Originally posted by Hooker's Trick:
Tail coat as in white tie and tails, or do you mean a frock coat?

Well really HT, I'm surprised at you. I'm sure that Lovely Doggie meant a Morning Coat or, as Colonialist Rebel Rubes such as Alastair Cooke might call it, a 'Cutaway' coat. A frock coat, as worn by the clergy and all other professions in their everyday working life, is different from a Morning Coat which is worn for daytime formal wear and a Tail Coat is only worn with a white tie in the evening for extra formal wear (in place of the dinner coat and black tie). Thus the Church of Scotland elders who, no doubt, were dispensing communion on behalf of their Governor, Queen Elizabeth, were quite correct to wear Morning Coats. If only more laymen were as well versed in these matters as they.

Cosmo


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Inanna

Ship's redhead
# 538

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quote:
daisymay recalled:
Easter Monday was definitely a major holiday, when everyone (whole families) went for a picnic and rolled dyed eggs down hills. They were very often red - don't know if any significance, or because cochineal was available, and sometimes stripy brown (onion skins tied around them while they boiled).

Actually, yep, there is a reason for red eggs, and it's all to do with Mary Magdalene.

From

this web page (which incidently also has a really nice icon image of her)

quote:
The Eastern tradition tells us that after the Ascension she journeyed to Rome where she was admitted to the court of Tiberius Caesar because of her high social standing. After describing how poorly Pilate had administered justice at Jesus’ trial, she told Caesar that Jesus had risen from the dead. To help explain His resurrection she picked up an egg from the dinner table. Caesar responded that a human being could no more rise from the dead than the egg in her hand turn red. The egg turned red immediately, which is why red eggs have been exchanged at Easter for centuries in the Byzantine East.


This page has a slightly different version, and symbolic meanings for other colours.

Counting the days til Easter...

Kirsti, who did know about the Sunday's feasting thing since becoming a Catholic, but didn't in my Anglican days.

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All shall be well
And all shall be well
And all manner of things shall be well.


Posts: 1495 | From: Royal Oak, MI | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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quote:
Originally posted by Cosmo:
A Tail Coat is only worn with a white tie in the evening for extra formal wear (in place of the dinner coat and black tie).

I think that, if one is being very particular, "black tie" (dinner jacket and black bow tie) is the alternative to the more proper "white tie" (tail-coat and white bow tie) rather than the other way around.

I was taught that if an invitiation to dine included the words "Dress informal" then it referred to black tie (which is informal, compared with white tie, the normal attire for dining).

One of my pet peeves is that so few men (especially orchestra conductors, it seems)understand the difference between tail-coat trousers and dinner jacket trousers.

And I am very disappointed that Lovely doggie's elders have stopped wearing morning coats. I have no doubt that it added a great deal of charm to the service. Does anyone still have such a tradition?

Pip pip

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


Posts: 7082 | From: Turbolift Control. | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
daisymay

St Elmo's Fire
# 1480

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Cosmo,
My elders all wore kilts - formal dress, yes, but different.

Inanna,
Now, the Scots got their Stone of Destiny from Syria (and it was originally Jacob's pillow), so it's quite possible that we got the egg tradition from the East as well. We didn't aquire the RC church till much later, and there are interesting theories about the Celtic Church.

We were usually taught at Sunday School that the eggs were representing the stone rolled away from the tomb, but I do vaguely recollect something like the 'breaking open to new life'. And we did have to break them - when you rolled them down the hill you tried to smash other peoples' eggs.

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London
Flickr fotos


Posts: 11162 | From: London - originally Dundee, Blairgowrie etc... | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hooker's Trick

Admin Emeritus and Guardian of the Gin
# 89

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Now you see it makes perfect sense to think that Lovely Doggie's elders might wear morning coats. But I wondered, by the mention of tail coats, if the service were in the evening or if Eucharist services in this particular place were tiarra sorts of events.

Wouldn't that be every so much more interesting? You know, "Service of Holy Communion. Decorations to be worn."


Posts: 6735 | From: Gin Lane | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
daisymay

St Elmo's Fire
# 1480

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"Champagne Eucharist" to celebrate Easter breakfast?

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London
Flickr fotos

Posts: 11162 | From: London - originally Dundee, Blairgowrie etc... | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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Continuing the theme of Protestant tat (almost a contradiction in terms)...

The following requires an understanding that Baptist ministers get very wet during baptisms (but usually not as wet as those baptised).

The pastor of the church at which I was baptised wore "casual" clothes for baptisms (shirt and trousers), but I used to know a pastor who thought it unseemly for him to lead a service in other than a suit and tie, consequently for baptisms he had a washable suit (one suspects a high polyester content).

I have also heard that some minsters have a set of "waders" to put over their other clothes when baptising, in order to keep their clothes dry, but I have never seen these in use (I have also heard it rumoured that the vatican has an ancient set of such waders, suggesting a long tradition for them - but this may be entirely untrue).

Could people share with me their own traditions and experiences of clerical attire for proper "dunkings"?

Pip pip

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


Posts: 7082 | From: Turbolift Control. | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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Chapelhead,

It is true that in many immersionist congregations (which includes Baptists and Disciples) you will find that the minister will wear hip waders to baptize. That makes it easier for the minister to change into dry clothes (While the choir sings an anthem or hymn) before returning to the pulpit to continue the service.

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I upped mine. Up yours.
Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?


Posts: 12001 | From: between keyboard and chair | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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Campbellite

It seems odd that I did not come across waders in my Baptist days. The ministers I knew got wet and then got changed. Perhaps they are in greater use outside the UK. Does your minister use them?

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


Posts: 7082 | From: Turbolift Control. | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
jlg

What is this place?
Why am I here?
# 98

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Would hip waders be 'anti-tat'? No, that's not quite right. Contra-tat, maybe?
Posts: 17391 | From: Just a Town, New Hampshire, USA | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
daisymay

St Elmo's Fire
# 1480

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The minister of my old baptist church (Westbourne Grove - just fell down ) used to wear waders for baptisms. Now he came from the north-east of Scotland, where there are loads of fishermen, and they all use waders in their day-to-day lives. So maybe it's just because they are locally commonly available.

The Brethern halls in Fife also used waders to keep their elders dry when they were baptising. Once, the water in the baptistry was too deep and slopped over the top and the elder was so weighed down that he nearly couldn't drag himself out of the pool.

Another time a wee elder was baptising half a dozen young strapping six footer fishermen. He managed all right for the first five, but slipped and was dragged under with the sixth.

We were baptised in white overalls, and strictly instructed to wear thick, non-transparent bras and pants - no wet t-shirt parades allowed. However, when it came to my children's era, daughter was baptised in dungarees and son in jeans. Two men in the congregation did the baptism, one on each side, very easy and efficient. They dressed in shorts and t-shirts.

Once we had a visitor who was amazed that we could have a whole baptistry full of "holy water", not realizing it wasn't.

We had immersion heaters to warm the water up, and once nearly boiled people - luckily someone noticed steam rising and added cold water.

My friend's litle girl baptised her teddy one Sunday after the baptismal service...

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London
Flickr fotos


Posts: 11162 | From: London - originally Dundee, Blairgowrie etc... | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Wood
The Milkman of Human Kindness
# 7

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Waders!?

Surely that's cheating.

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Narcissism.


Posts: 7842 | From: Wood Towers | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chapelhead*

Ship’s Photographer
# 1143

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At the church I used to attend, for baptism the men wore suitable “casual” clothes, whilst the women were provided with baptismal dresses. These were white, ankle-length affairs, weighted with a chain sewn in to the bottom hem to help stop them riding up when entering the baptismal pool - air tends to get trapped in the skirt causing it to balloon up when walking down the steps into the pool, potentially inducing lustful thoughts in the young men at the sight of a female knee.

The dresses were fairly non-see-though when wet, but we were instructed to wear swimming costumes underneath, for the sake of decorum.

Does anyone know if, in very traditional Baptist (and similar) churches, female candidates wear hats (bonnets?) when getting baptised?

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Benedikt Gott Geschickt!


Posts: 7082 | From: Turbolift Control. | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged



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