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Source: (consider it) Thread: Doctor Who: The Eleventh Incarnation
Flausa

Mad Woman
# 3466

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They better do something really, really amazing with that crack in time, because otherwise that was a really crap way to write out Roary. I was close to demaning RTD back after that episode, because at least I could deal with his crap.
Posts: 4610 | From: bonny Scotland | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
dj_ordinaire
Host
# 4643

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quote:
Originally posted by Angloid:
quote:
Originally posted by The Revolutionist:
Maybe somewhere in the universe, Rory, a bunch of clerics, and some startled weeping angels have found themselves on the other side of the crack! We'll have to wait and see...

Ecclesiantics perhaps?
Oi, I heard that! [Razz]

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Flinging wide the gates...

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Gill H

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# 68

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I thought of something the other day.

You know the kids' game "Grandmother's Footsteps"? One person at the front with their back turned, and the others try to sneak up on them - except they have to freeze when the person at the front turns round.

I wonder if anyone is playing this as "Weeping Angels" now? That could really mess with kids' heads!

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- Lyda Rose

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The Revolutionist
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# 4578

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Gill H - I'm sure I've heard Moffat say in an interview that they try and invent monsters that easily translate into playground games.

The new Doctor Who computer game, City of the Daleks, is now available to download for free for those in the UK. I'm just about to give it a whirl, looks fun!

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Adeodatus
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# 4992

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After The Hungry Earth being a good setup, I thought Cold Blood was a bit of a disappointment. Didn't quite realise the potential. The last ten minutes, however, were pure jumping-off-the-sofa material. Poor Rory (apparently)! Poor Amy (apparently)! Poor TARDIS (apparently)! Stand by for a twisty, turny, timey-wimey finale, methinks!


* * * Ssh! Spoilers! * * *


Last night I watched the preview clips for Vincent and the Doctor on the BBC site, and wow! - I'm so looking forward to it. The dialogue glitters, Bill Nighy and Matt Smith have a bit of a bow tie moment, and I especially like the way the camera shots have been framed to look like van Gogh's paintings. (It helps, I guess, that van G is one of my favourite artists, but even so, it looks pretty impressive.)

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"What is broken, repair with gold."

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Dafyd
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# 5549

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Random thought:
The Tenth Doctor's problem was that deep down part of him thought he was God.
The Eleventh Doctor's problem is that deep down part of him thinks that he's only a madman with a box.

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Adeodatus:
I especially like the way the camera shots have been framed to look like van Gogh's paintings.

We have a large print of "Cafe Terrace By Night" in our sitting room. It was really weird watching the trailer and seeing that view on the TV then glancing sideways to see it still on our wall.
I'm looking forward to tonight's episode. Even if the plot is full of holes I will enjoy the scenery. [Big Grin]

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Pine Marten
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# 11068

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I am absolutely looking forward to it, Vincent being one of my favourite painters. I sat openmouthed at the trailers, Cafe by Night an' all! Marvellous - and if Bill Nighy's in it, doubly-marvellous, whoo-hoo!

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Macrina
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# 8807

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I cried all over that episode. It genuinely moved me.
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Sparrow
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# 2458

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That's more like it! Best of the series so far I think. Absolutely lovely. I cried too. Especially the end.

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Ariel
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# 58

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What a beautiful, bittersweet story. A silly alien but otherwise a lovely and moving episode. I've never liked Van Gogh's paintings but after this I feel a lot more sympathetic to him.

The scene in the museum at the end was sweet, but a little nerve-wracking at the same time - I was wondering how close they'd come to Vincent discovering his own date of death, maybe in a biog of the artist on one of the information panels.

Odd choice of subject for a Doctor Who episode though. I wouldn't have thought highbrow art would have fitted into Doctor Who, nor that Amy would have had any interest in it.

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Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells
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# 15431

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Definitely one of the best of the current series. Yes, it was a fairly basic monster, but I liked the way it became a sympathetic figure. 8/10

quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Odd choice of subject for a Doctor Who episode though. I wouldn't have thought highbrow art would have fitted into Doctor Who...

The Mona Lisa played an important role in City of Death.

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was phil2357

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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An interesting take on the basilisk legend, (or is it a cockatrice?) combined with a child's fear of invisible monsters.

And van Gough with a Scottish accent. I liked it.

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tessaB
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# 8533

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Simply lovely. Cried when Vincent was in the art gallery listening to how wonderful the bow tie man thought he was. Really very moving and beautifully filmed.

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tessaB
eating chocolate to the glory of God
Holiday cottage near Rye

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Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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Confidential was very interesting, in that they explained that the monster was, to an extent, a physical manifestation of Vincents "demons". So the invisible monster that only he can see and he has to fight takes on a whole new meaning.

And it was excellent. Sensitive, caring, important and a real demonstration of the "humanity" of the Doctor, in showing Vincent what he would become.

And the climax, with the realisation that, just as the doctor could do nothing about the invisible monster, he could also do nothing about Vincents other invisible monster, and save him from an early death. Just stunning.

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Kitten
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# 1179

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quote:
Originally posted by Macrina:
I cried all over that episode. It genuinely moved me.

Me to

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Angloid
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# 159

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Lots of tears around! I thought it was great.

Uncanny how closely the actor resembled Vincent, so that when he held up his self-portrait he was totally believable. And the accent thing gave rise to a comment that will go down in legend along with Christopher Eccleston's 'lots of planets have a north': on hearing Amy's Scottish accent he said 'do you come from Holland too?'

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Crowd: We're all individuals!
Lone voice: I'm not!

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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So was there any particular significance in The Doctor calling Vincent 'Rory' at one point?

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Jay-Emm
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# 11411

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quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
So was there any particular significance in The Doctor calling Vincent 'Rory' at one point?

You also had "Amy's sadness", song?.

Presumbably a reflection that on one level the Dr hasn't got used to Rory's absence. Or that to the Dr it's always AmyandRory.

Series wise there seem a number of indications he will be important later, maybe he gets brought back, maybe Amy decides she can't live without him, maybe the Dr has to decide whether to let Rory fade.

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Robert Armin

All licens'd fool
# 182

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That was a very beautiful episode. One of the best ever. By itself it has made up for all the shortcomings of this series.

And talking of those shortcomings, may I take you back to the episode that finished with Amy trying to pull the Doctor into bed? At the time I assumed this would lead to an explanation that some alien force had been messing with her mind. However, the Doctor's answer was to bring Rory into the Tardis so presumably it was an expression of raw lust after all. Now Rory has gone, and never existed as far as Amy is concerned, so will we see the lust flare up again? (I don't want that, BTW, but it feels like a dangling plotline to me.)

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Keeping fit was an obsession with Fr Moity .... He did chin ups in the vestry, calisthenics in the pulpit, and had developed a series of Tai-Chi exercises to correspond with ritual movements of the Mass. The Antipope Robert Rankin

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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I too found it a very moving episode. I did think the monster looked a bit like people dressed in blankets with a paper-maché head bobbing about, but we didn't see it for long enough for that to worry me too much. The location for the church annoyed me a little as the church didn't look anything like the church he was painting, what with having a good ol' English (Welsh?) graveyard around it. But these are just niggles. Generally I found it interesting, and very moving.

And I realy like Matt Smith's Doctor. I thought DT was v good looking (except when he was gurning) but that's not necessary in a Doctor. What's necessary is whatever Matt brings to the part. I'm just not quite sure what that is!!!!

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40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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Pine Marten
Shipmate
# 11068

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I'm another one who snivelled through the episode, especially at the end. There were a couple of inaccuracies, but what the hell! it was a lovely, very moving episode. I snivelled a bit at the death of the monster, too, when they realised he was 'afraid'.

I laughed out loud at the 'are you from Holland?' comment, and also at Amy's remark about having ginger children! The actor playing Vincent (who I've seen several times in different things but didn't know his name) was spot-on in looks - particularly with his hat on, it was a portrait come to life.

I loved the look and colour of the episode, they filmed it beautifully. One of the best to date.

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Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead. - Oscar Wilde

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Lola

Ship's kink
# 627

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quote:
Originally posted by Robert Armin:
That was a very beautiful episode. One of the best ever. By itself it has made up for all the shortcomings of this series.

And talking of those shortcomings, may I take you back to the episode that finished with Amy trying to pull the Doctor into bed? At the time I assumed this would lead to an explanation that some alien force had been messing with her mind. However, the Doctor's answer was to bring Rory into the Tardis so presumably it was an expression of raw lust after all. Now Rory has gone, and never existed as far as Amy is concerned, so will we see the lust flare up again? (I don't want that, BTW, but it feels like a dangling plotline to me.)

I'm sure Rory is coming back in the finale - the Doctor was able to reach into the crack and pull out a piece of the Tardis - surely that shows things can be brought back.

Amy is refreshing change in the companion. Essentially I see her as being written as a stroppy little madam - she wants to have her own way and be the centre of attention, she doesn't like anyone to show weakness, she flounces around but underneath she wants Rory to be there waiting patiently and loving he like the good man that he is. I don't think she'd mind if he put his foot down a little more. I think she's very realisitic.

She was poucing on the Doctor because she was feeling that it was a bit too sensible to get married to Rory so young - now that Rory has never existed I can't see she'll need to.

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Lola

Ship's kink
# 627

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quote:
Originally posted by Lola:
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Armin:
That was a very beautiful episode. One of the best ever. By itself it has made up for all the shortcomings of this series.

And talking of those shortcomings, may I take you back to the episode that finished with Amy trying to pull the Doctor into bed? At the time I assumed this would lead to an explanation that some alien force had been messing with her mind. However, the Doctor's answer was to bring Rory into the Tardis so presumably it was an expression of raw lust after all. Now Rory has gone, and never existed as far as Amy is concerned, so will we see the lust flare up again? (I don't want that, BTW, but it feels like a dangling plotline to me.)

I'm sure Rory is coming back in the finale - the Doctor was able to reach into the crack and pull out a piece of the Tardis - surely that shows things can be brought back.

Amy is refreshing change in the companion. Essentially I see her as being written as a stroppy little madam - she wants to have her own way and be the centre of attention, she doesn't like anyone to show weakness, she flounces around but underneath she wants Rory to be there waiting patiently and loving he like the good man that he is. I don't think she'd mind if he put his foot down a little more. I think she's very realisitic.

She was poucing on the Doctor because she was feeling that it was a bit too sensible to get married to Rory so young - now that Rory has never existed I can't see she'll need to.

Sorry - I meant to sat I think the Doctor pulled Rory into the Tardis to show him up in a stronger, more exciting role.
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Earwig

Pincered Beastie
# 12057

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Saw this and had to share it on this thread: The Last Supper.
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Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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Another one chiming in to say that was my favourite episode so far, very moving (I shed a tear too, and again during Dr Who Confidential immediately afterwards).

I thought the choice of "Chances" by Athlete as the background music for the final scene when Vincent was in the Museum was inspired.

Very good. Can they get Richard Curtis back to write some more episodes?

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Auntie Doris

Screen Goddess
# 9433

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I loved it! I am been so unconvinced by this series that I am delighted to have it redeemed by such a beautifully scripted and generally lovely episode.

I even quite liked the new Dr in this one!

Auntie Doris x

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Eigon
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# 4917

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I cried too - and I liked the way the Doctor kept a wary eye on the stone angel on his way into the church.

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Ferijen
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# 4719

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I really thought that the monster might have lopped ol' Vincent's ear off... but very much enjoyed it.
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The Great Gumby

Ship's Brain Surgeon
# 10989

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quote:
Originally posted by Lola:
I'm sure Rory is coming back in the finale - the Doctor was able to reach into the crack and pull out a piece of the Tardis - surely that shows things can be brought back.

Well, yes and no. It seemed pretty clear that he was dying anyway after being shot, so his consumption by the crack is somewhat irrelevant, n'est-ce pas? That said, I wouldn't put it past them to invent some sort of bizarre excuse for him still being alive. However, I am expecting that his disappearance will play an important part in the sealing of the crack, as we've had heavy hints dropped about Amy forgetting him (or not), and the effect of that. I expect it'll all come down to Amy having to remember him (she still seems to have some sort of memory in the back of her mind) to sort it all out. Hopefully, we'll also get an explanation of why the crack's still there, given that it's apparently (according to the Weeping Angels) emanating from her wedding day, which now isn't going to happen, due to the mysterious disappearance of the groom.

I'm going against the majority on this week's effort, but I just didn't like it. As a whimsical potted biography of van Gogh, it worked quite well, but the rest was nonsense. The monster was ridiculous, the identification gadget was ludicrous, and there was no satisfactory explanation of why Vincent could see it or why it was invisible. On top of that, the death of the creature was sentimental tosh, and the last 5 minutes or so were unbearable drivel that was totally out of character.

The Doctor may like to play fast and loose with rules and even time itself, but surely showing a character as famous and iconic as VvG how he would be remembered is obviously running a major risk of huge paradoxes, time rifts and other not-at-all-good things. It would have served them right (and I was half-expecting this) if they'd gone back to the museum to find the exhibition devoted to some entirely different artist, while no one had ever heard of van Gogh. I wouldn't even have minded so much if he'd acknowledged the risk and flippantly dismissed it, but to me it felt like the crowning turd.

I just hope the series finale lives up to the hints that have been dropped along the way, because the gradual reveals have been the only things making some recent episodes worth the airtime. And I'm sorry, Mr Moffat, but I don't care what you say - I really can tell that the budget's been cut.

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The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. - Richard Feynman

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Josephine

Orthodox Belle
# 3899

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quote:
Originally posted by The Great Gumby:
The monster was ridiculous, the identification gadget was ludicrous, and there was no satisfactory explanation of why Vincent could see it or why it was invisible.

I kept expecting the Doctor to throw paint on it, to make it visible. Maybe that wouldn't have worked, but it seemed like an obvious thing to try, given that they were there with a painter, and there was loads of paint around.

I also would have liked to understand why only Vincent could see it, and why he knew that Amy had lost someone. Is that going to play into some future something?

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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As the TARDIS controls were made of junk, it seemed appropriate that the device (whatever it was) should be junk too.

And a nice in joke for those who have visited the musee d'Orcay in that the device recognised the creature as first a parrot (there are a couple of famous portraits of a naked woman and of a young woman, both with parots, and more obviously a polar bear, of wich the d'Ocay has a famous sculpture.

Sorry I can't remember the artists, as I was preocupied with Monet when I was there, (Monet being the reason why the bow tie man was wrong about Vincent being the greatest ever painter.)

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Posts: 9049 | From: Hen Ogledd | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
As the TARDIS controls were made of junk, it seemed appropriate that the device (whatever it was) should be junk too.

And a nice in joke for those who have visited the musee d'Orcay in that the device recognised the creature as first a parrot (there are a couple of famous portraits of a naked woman and of a young woman, both with parrots, and more obviously a polar bear, of which the d'Ocay has a famous sculpture.

Sorry I can't remember the artists, as I was preoccupied with Monet when I was there, (Monet being the reason why the bow tie man was wrong about Vincent being the greatest ever painter.)

[accidentally turned spell checker off - Oops.]

[and I hit quote instead of edit. - double oops]

[ 06. June 2010, 21:30: Message edited by: Balaam ]

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Posts: 9049 | From: Hen Ogledd | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Dafyd
Shipmate
# 5549

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The greatest painter ever was Rembrandt. Greatest portrait or self-portrait painter ever, anyway.
I believe that the woman with a parrot is by Courbet.

I never quite enjoy these episodes with real people in as much as I should. I'm always worried that the person is being reduced to a caricature. E.g. I would be surprised if Van Gogh was really sure that his work was not very good.
The Doctor said he'd be surprised if taking Van Gogh to see posterity changed anything, given that Amy was enthusiastic that it would. I suppose the Doctor's knowledge of fixed-points in time and other timey-wimey stuff meant he knew it wouldn't. (I hope so because otherwise people are right to think it was irresponsible. Richard Curtis being heartwarming even when it doesn't quite make sense.)

Otherwise, as a Doctor Who episode about a depressive painter with near-psychic powers I did enjoy it.

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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Pious Pelican
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# 13120

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

Odd choice of subject for a Doctor Who episode though. I wouldn't have thought highbrow art would have fitted into Doctor Who, nor that Amy would have had any interest in it.

In a way it is Doctor Who going back to its roots: in its original conception it was meant to be an educational series.

I'm sure it is also a nod to the classic Tom Baker serial, City of Death, which begins when the Doctor visits the Louvre to see the Mona Lisa.

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Flausa

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# 3466

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quote:
Originally posted by Dafyd:
I would be surprised if Van Gogh was really sure that his work was not very good.

A man struggling with depression and madness not sure about the quality of his work? It rings true to me. And his comment about "the one with the haystacks" was my laugh-out-loud moment.

I did really enjoy this episode in spite of some plot holes. However, I felt it was a weak attempt by the doctor (and of course, the writers) to compensate for the loss of Roary.

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Schroedinger's cat

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# 64

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quote:
Originally posted by Josephine:
I also would have liked to understand why only Vincent could see it, and why he knew that Amy had lost someone. Is that going to play into some future something?

Only Vincent could see it because a) it was partly a representation of his own inner demons and b) Vincent was able to see things that other people couldn't see, or rather in a way that others couldn't see them.

That is also why he knew that Amy had lost someone - he saw it in a way that others didn't. However it did remind me of the comment from another series "You've had a spider on your back" - which only meant that the person saying it could see deeper or differently to most people.

And Vincent was bipolar. I have no doubt whatsoever that he considered his own work rubbish, especially as so many other people considered it rubbish. A negative acceptance of others criticism is a part of the depressive nature of bipolar.

And it seems that taking him to see his art was what inspired him to produce his best pieces. And that the production of his best work at the end of his life was also an indication that his illness was getting worse, leading to his own suicide. It sort of makes sense to me that the visit made no real difference - again the nature of his illness was to reflect the highs in even more intense lows.

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Chelley

Ship's Old Boot
# 11322

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quote:
Originally posted by The Great Gumby:

It would have served them right (and I was half-expecting this) if they'd gone back to the museum to find the exhibition devoted to some entirely different artist, while no one had ever heard of van Gogh.

I loved it, but I was also half expecting the paintings to have disappeared or something to have changed at the museum (especially when the statue they passed on the stairs had changed its pose!).

[ETA on reading Shroedinger's Cat's post - that was my understanding too of why nothing had actually changed!]

[ 07. June 2010, 08:36: Message edited by: Chelley ]

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Adeodatus
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# 4992

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Isn't it amazing that after thirty-something seasons over nearly 47 years, this show can still do something delightfully unlike anything else that has gone before? And isn't it also amazing that on a Saturday teatime we can sit down and watch a drama about art and mental illness disguised as a drama about an alien who travels in a phone box and another alien that looks like a giant plucked chicken?

This episode was utterly delightful from start to finish. Richard Curtis has a nice ear for dialogue, and he always manages to make it sound natural at the same time as it's funny. But he also portrayed Vincent's bipolar disorder about as well as you possibly could in a one-off 45 minute drama.

If that wasn't enough, he made the whole thing a parable about the nature of "seeing". The Doctor sees things broadly - he can show you the whole of time and space, but he gets bored and miserable when time passes "slowly ... in the right order". Vincent sees things deeply, but is trapped in his tiny universe of depression. The Doctor tries to show Vincent the world beyond Vincent's limitations (by taking him to the museum); Vincent tries to show the Doctor the world beneath the Doctor's limitations (by showing him the "starry night" - with a clever little artistic subtext of "if you can't see the night sky like this, what hope have you of seeing a giant chicken?" ... or maybe vice versa).

I cried floods at Vincent's reaction to the museum, but I knew he would still go home and kill himself, because that's how that kind of mental illness works.

I thought it was the best 45 minutes of telly I've seen this year.

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Adeodatus
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# 4992

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quote:
Originally posted by Adeodatus:
I cried floods at Vincent's reaction to the museum, but I knew he would still go home and kill himself, because that's how that kind of mental illness works.

Ooh. Ouch. Sorry, that reads very badly. I didn't mean that's how that kind of mental illness always ends. I only meant that (speaking from personal experience) if you have depression or, I guess, bipolar disorder that involves periodic depression, then however good other people's opinions of you are, it seems to make little or no difference to how badly you see yourself.

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andythehat

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# 10399

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quote:
Ooh. Ouch. Sorry, that reads very badly. I didn't mean that's how that kind of mental illness always ends. I only meant that (speaking from personal experience) if you have depression or, I guess, bipolar disorder that involves periodic depression, then however good other people's opinions of you are, it seems to make little or no difference to how badly you see yourself. [/QB]
Quite right Adeodatus. I found a couple of scenes quite hard to watch, but it kind of helped Mrs Hat - "My God I'm married to Vincent Van Gogh" was one comment - as it showed very well the efefcts of depression. But overall, I'm afraid that this series is slowly dropping off the "Must See" list - apart from being vaguely interested in how it all comes together in a couple of weeks time, I've just about lost patience with Messrs Moffat and Smith. I said I'd give them a fair crack at it...

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
As the TARDIS controls were made of junk, it seemed appropriate that the device (whatever it was)

A field guide, I suspect. For the Time Lord equivalent of birdwatchers or botanists.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Why shouldn't Amy already like Van Gogh's paintings? I'm not sure he counts as "high art" in the elitist sense, or if he does he's popular high art. As the man said in the museum he's the most popular modern painter.

As for Rory, it seemed to me that the Doctor isn't at all over losing him. And he finds it very distressing and a bit icky when Amy is attracted to anyone else, whether its himself or Vincent.

Which I suppose is something time-travellers have to live with. In his timeline Amy was as good as married to Rory. (I somehow suspect that the Doctor disapproves of marital infidelity) In Amy's timeline Rory never existed. So he cannot even share with her any grief or guilt he might have about Rory's death. Because it was never part of her history, which is in effect a slightly different parallel world from the one in which they met, which was a very different one from the one the Christmas Specials happened in. So the Doctor is both entirely alone (which he is used to of course) and has an emotional reaction against Amy having anything to do with any other man.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Pine Marten
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# 11068

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quote:
Originally posted by Adeodatus:
Isn't it amazing that after thirty-something seasons over nearly 47 years, this show can still do something delightfully unlike anything else that has gone before? And isn't it also amazing that on a Saturday teatime we can sit down and watch a drama about art and mental illness disguised as a drama about an alien who travels in a phone box and another alien that looks like a giant plucked chicken?


Absolutely right! I've watched it 3 or 4 times now, and still end up in tears. And yes, having had bouts of depression myself (though nowhere near as bad as some), I remember the black abyss where there is no other way out than the one Vincent chose.

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Rev per Minute
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# 69

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Adding my two pennorth...

I buy all the stuff about depression/bipolar disorder, and so on, but I also thought that there was a reference to synaesthesia (sp?), the ability to 'mix senses' in some way (feeling that the number seven is purple, for example, or being able to taste words). Vincent said that he could 'hear the colours' and I wonder if that was how he could see the monster when no-one else could. Not sure a bucket of paint would have helped to reveal the Gryfrace if that was the case - it would have been like painting a sound (although the easel did a good job of killing it, I suppose).

I did wonder about the paradox of Vincent seeing the museum and whether that would mean he would stop painting or fail to become famous, but perhaps the Doctor knew - either through his 'fixed points' or his knowledge of human nature - that van Gogh would still be tortured even with the knowledge of later fame. The 'For Amy' touch on 'Sunflowers' was nice, though.

And what does Bill Nighy have on Richard Curtis that he appears in everything Curtis writes?

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Sparrow
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# 2458

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quote:
Originally posted by Rev per Minute:
Adding my two pennorth...
....

And what does Bill Nighy have on Richard Curtis that he appears in everything Curtis writes?

Anyone else think that was an "almost gay" minute between him and the Doctor when they were complimenting each other's bow ties?

[Hot and Hormonal]

- and he looked very pleased with himself when Vicent hugged and kissed him ....

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Sparrow
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# 2458

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A new Torchwood series!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment_and_arts/10262266.stm

[Smile] [Smile] [Smile]

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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angelica37
Shipmate
# 8478

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After the horrible ending of Children of Earth I'm not sure I ever want to see Captain Jack again. [Frown]
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Adeodatus
Shipmate
# 4992

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
I'm not sure he counts as "high art" in the elitist sense, or if he does he's popular high art. As the man said in the museum he's the most popular modern painter.

Van Gogh's reputation has varied over the years, but to me he's one of a handful of all-time greats. I'm not sure, however, that I'd say his paintings are "high art", because to me that makes them sound awfully stuffy and they're anything but. First of all, to see a real van Gogh is utterly different from seeing a reproduction - the Doctor was right when he said that Vincent carved the paint. That, and the violence of the colours he often uses, seems to me to make his paintings demand an emotional response from the viewer in a way that few others can match. I'm awe-struck by the intensity of feeling I get from van Gogh's paintings. He's one of the few artists who teaches you the first principle of painting - to be absolutely, unflinchingly true to how you see the world.

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"What is broken, repair with gold."

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Giac
Apprentice
# 15580

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Thought it was an ok episode. The scenes themselves were beautiful, the acting was good. Only the few small niggles, like the fact that VvG still had two ears (I'm probably wrong but I thought he'd lost it over a year before, May 1889 or something.) But overall an enjoyable episode. I can't help feeling that they're building up to something big with the finale though. This was the second time we got flashes of the previous doctors (the ones in the giant eyeball in the first episode and the ones in the mirror thing). I also think there's got to be something with the angels, as you say the stone angel again and the Doctor made reference to his God-mother who "had two heads." I'm probably just reading too much into that though.

quote:
Originally posted by sparrow

A new Torchwood series!

Oh please no. The Children of Earth was just painful to watch. I thought they'd gone to pains to kill or distance all the characters. Though the new team will probably be Jack, Alonso, Gwen, Martha and Micky. [Projectile]

[ 12. June 2010, 00:03: Message edited by: Giac ]

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