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Source: (consider it) Thread: HEAVEN: Burnt Offerings: the recipe thread
Huia
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Firenze that might even tempt me to eat potatoes again.

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LutheranChik
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A cooking show here recently demonstrated a recipe for a fast dessert using premade puff pastry, apples, sugar, lemon juice and rind and a pinch of salt. First the sheet of pastry was cut in half, making two rectangles. The apples, unpeeled, were cored, halved and then cut into thin little half-moons, which were overlapped in a pleasing way atop the pastry. Then came the juice of I think half a lemon, drizzled over the apples; then several spoonsful of regular sugar and micrograted lemon rind sprinkled over the apples; then a pinch of salt judiciously sprinkled over each rectangle. No other flavoring, which surprised me. Then the pastries were baked according to directions on the pastry package. The result looked beautiful, with the sugar, lemon and apple juice mingling to create a self-syrup.I think I'd like to try it with pears instead, and maybe a bit of spice.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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Just made a v successful dessert with similar features - but minus the pastry.

Peel pears. Halve them and dig out seedy bits. Lay in a buttered dish and top with pats of butter, brown sugar and lemon juice. Bake for 20 minutes or until pears soften. Pour off the liquid and beat into some mascarpone. Spoon this over the baked pears.

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churchgeek

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I'm making caramel corn this Christmas to give to coworkers, and thought I'd share this wonderful recipe from a friend of my mom's:

Bring to a boil the following 4 ingredients, and boil 5 minutes:

2c. brown sugar
2 sticks butter (she actually had margarine, but that was the '70s)
1/2 c. corn syrup
1 tsp cream of tartar


Remove from heat and add 1 tsp. baking soda. Pour over 6 quarts popped popcorn (in an ungreased pan) quick!

Put in oven at 250 degrees for 40 minutes. While it's baking, break it up every so often.


I really like this particular recipe because the caramel ends up crunchy rather than chewy - less trouble for dental work! Plus it's quite tasty. You can, of course, adjust the amount of popcorn depending on whether you want more or less caramel on the popcorn. (Some people like a mere drizzle, others, like me, want the popcorn well-coated.) As it is, the recipe coats the popcorn somewhere in-between, i.e., just right.

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Palimpsest
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Jacque Pepin has a similar dish. It uses a non stick silpat sheet but I suspect you could do with buttered parchment paper.

Make a bit of browned butter and sugar. Put some on the non stick silpat and place a flour tortilla on it and add more butter/brown sugar. Cover with slices of pear and brush with apricot jam. Bake for a half hour, Let cool and remove from sheet. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream.

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georgiaboy
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quote:
Originally posted by churchgeek:
I'm making caramel corn this Christmas to give to coworkers, and thought I'd share this wonderful recipe from a friend of my mom's:

Bring to a boil the following 4 ingredients, and boil 5 minutes:

2c. brown sugar
2 sticks butter (she actually had margarine, but that was the '70s)
1/2 c. corn syrup
1 tsp cream of tartar


Remove from heat and add 1 tsp. baking soda. Pour over 6 quarts popped popcorn (in an ungreased pan) quick!

Put in oven at 250 degrees for 40 minutes. While it's baking, break it up every so often.


I really like this particular recipe because the caramel ends up crunchy rather than chewy - less trouble for dental work! Plus it's quite tasty. You can, of course, adjust the amount of popcorn depending on whether you want more or less caramel on the popcorn. (Some people like a mere drizzle, others, like me, want the popcorn well-coated.) As it is, the recipe coats the popcorn somewhere in-between, i.e., just right.

This sounds much like my aunt's method for popcorn balls, which she made every Christmas time (and I got to help, even as a small child!).
What I most remember was having to work very quickly, and slathering butter all over my hands to keep the product from sticking to me!

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Ariel
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I recently melted some chocolate to pour into patterned moulds to make small chocolates with a design on the front. Once they were set and I turned them out of the mould, the fronts were fine but the backs were mostly really uneven.

There seems to be an art to getting the backs look even. The chocolate was only just melted, so not blistering hot/very runny. I'd tried smoothing them out with a hot spoon while they were still in the mould in the semi-liquid stage and that didn't work well. Someone else said that the thing to do was to put them (while still in the mould) under a very low grill, but after 15 minutes it was clear that wasn't going to work either, and turning the heat up got bubbles and altered the texture to much softer and the flavour depreciated. Any suggestions?

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The5thMary
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This is not a recipe, for which I apologize, but rather a funny typo related to food that I just wanted to throw in here for sheer whimsy.

I had to go to the local Veterans Administration the other day to conduct some business for a veteran friend and stopped by the v.a. canteen for some breakfast. There was a printed menu in the entrance and I saw that the lunch special was pork loin, green beans and
quote:
candid potatoes
. Oh, how I laughed! Can you imagine? "Yes, we are delicious but we're fattening and will make your blood sugar rise rapidly and fall even quicker! Don't get us wrong, we're tasty but do you really need to consume us?" Anyway... back to recipes!

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Lyda*Rose

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That was special. [Big Grin]

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Huia
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Does that mean people actually candy potatoes?

Huia (the ignorant) hurries quickly from the room.

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Ariel
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quote:
Originally posted by The5thMary:
This is not a recipe, for which I apologize, but rather a funny typo related to food that I just wanted to throw in here for sheer whimsy.

Well, we do have a Random Tangents (of a Heavenly Nature) thread where people can post whimsy, things they want to share that don't involve discussion, etc...

Cheers
Ariel

[ 22. December 2013, 07:34: Message edited by: Ariel ]

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Moo

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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Does that mean people actually candy potatoes?

Huia (the ignorant) hurries quickly from the room.

You candy sweet potatoes. They are a traditional Thanksgiving dish in my part of the country.

Here is a recipe.

Moo

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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Query: I've just been boiling a piece of gammon in cider. Any ideas for a future repurposing of a pint or so of rather appley, salty stock?
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ArachnidinElmet
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Query: I've just been boiling a piece of gammon in cider. Any ideas for a future repurposing of a pint or so of rather appley, salty stock?

Maybe a nice apple and parsnip soup?

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Mr Curly

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I have just harvested some beetroots, roasted them ready for a salad for Christmas lunch. Picture and recipe here along with the menu for the rest of the meal.

mr curly
. . . who is recovering after three days of temps in the high 30 deg c.

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chive

Ship's nude
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I've just made a clootie dumpling as my contribution for tomorrow's Christmas dinner. OK, I admit it, because I can't cook I made the microwave version, similar to this recipe except as is traditional I got mine from my mammy.

It does genuinely taste not too much different from the traditionally boiled for hours version, honest. [Biased]

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Ariel
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"Amount per serving: Calories 3562.8." Go carefully, chive [Biased]
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jedijudy

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quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
I'm thinking of making a veggie lasagna for part of Christmas dinner. My thoughts are to grill a variety of veggies, drain them, then use my regular recipe but substituting the veg for the ground beef. [Smile]

The veggie lasagna is in the fridge ready to bake tomorrow! I decided not to add any herbs and spices to the veg (yellow squash, zucchini and broccoli) when I grilled them. And of course, they wouldn't need draining! They smelled so delightful and I'm looking forward to tasting it tomorrow.

I also made a traditional meat lasagna, for those who prefer that.

There will be a report later, I promise!

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Moo

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I was in a grocery store recently, and I saw a large bag of black rice. If it had been a small bag, I might have bought it and tried it. I have no idea what black rice is like. Can someone tell me?

Moo

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Ann

Curious
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I have some Black Rice - it was on special offer - and I haven't noticed anything wonderful about the taste nor the texture, but I am not a gourmet by any means.

I've a feeling there are several varieties of a rice-like grain which go by names such as Black Rice or Wild Rice - and so mine may not be the same as the one you saw.

Even on special offer, the stuff was more expensive and so I've cooked it with white rice to try and get a pretty speckled effect and the one thing I've found when cooking some black rice in with ordinary rice is that, even with prolonged soaking/rinsing, the black stains the whole lot a grubby grey - last time I cooked them separately (an extra pan to wash) and only mixed them just before serving. I haven't tried steaming so I don't know if the colour would bleed there as well.

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jedijudy

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The veggie lasagna was a huge success! Some of the carnivores tried it just to say that they had done so, and reported that they would have been happy with that had I not also made the meat one.

It stays in my file of recipes to keep.

My mom, the vegetarian, declared it to be very good, and she was glad I sent some over to her and dad. (Dad also got some of the meat variety, too!)

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Lothlorien
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quote:
The veggie lasagna was a huge success! Some of the carnivores tried it just to say that they had done so, and reported that they would have been happy with that had I not also made the meat one.
[Yipee] [Yipee]

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Penny S
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quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Query: I've just been boiling a piece of gammon in cider. Any ideas for a future repurposing of a pint or so of rather appley, salty stock?

Maybe a nice apple and parsnip soup?
Check the saltiness first - I have some practically inedible soup from that sort of source.
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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I never got round to it, and it got chucked in my post-Christmas fridge audit.

Today is not culinary highlight time. The breadmaker sullenly refused to cooperate with a white/polenta loaf, so it's back to the emergency muffins for breakfast. Dinner is going to be a Lidl three-fish roast (take out of packet, put in oven, dump on plate). Tomorrow I think sausages with bubble and squeak. I've stopped caring.

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Jane R
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Firenze:
quote:
...emergency muffins...
[imagines muffins with jam stripes down the side and little flashing blue lights on top]
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Penny S
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Oooh, bubble and squeak. The perils of not doing one's own Christmas lunch. I haven't any greens. This requires a foray up the garden to investigate the cauliflower leaves.
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Ariel
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Sausages and colcannon are good winter fare.

I caved in and bought a jar of Finest/Taste the Difference/Somethingorother spaghetti sauce. The sundried tomato and mascarpone kind. Cook spaghetti, put aside on warm plate, throw raw prawns and peas into the pot, when prawns are pink add dollops of sauce, a splash of brandy, some black pepper, heat through, throw spaghetti back in, mix through and serve. Great for those evenings when you don't want to spend time in the kitchen as the sauce takes less than 5 minutes.

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jedijudy

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quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
Firenze:
quote:
...emergency muffins...
[imagines muffins with jam stripes down the side and little flashing blue lights on top]
Quotes file! [Big Grin]

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Clotilde
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I wonder if kindly kitchen folk can help me.

We've a few large cooking apples here. I was wondering about putting them in the slow cooker.

Any suggestions how to do this - simple is good [Smile]

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lily pad
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Maybe check out this page for a way to use up apples. Personally, I would make applesauce. Do you deliver? [Biased]

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Pomona
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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Does that mean people actually candy potatoes?

Huia (the ignorant) hurries quickly from the room.

Caramelised potatoes are traditional in Denmark at Christmas, but they're not really candied as such.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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LutheranChik
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Having been read the riot act by her doctor, DP is going to begin the DASH Diet on Monday; for the uninitiated, this is a diet for controlling hypertension and heart disease via controlling salt, cholesterol and other contributing factors. This is also a good idea for me, although MY doctor favors the Mediterranean Diet, which is more forgiving as far as fat intake (good fats like olive oil) and moderate use of salty foods like olives but more strict in terms of limiting meat consumption.

So I think we're going to wind up with a mashup of both diets. Our household challenges are going to be mostly in terms of portion control -- we're both inclined to make family-sized recipes -- and in adapting the diet recipes to DP's needs as an ostomate; the emphasis on fibrous veggies and whole grains, for instance, can create problems, as does eating seafood too frequently. And DP loves salt, much more than I do, so I anticipate much whingeing and unhappiness until her tastebuds recalibrate. We'll just have to muddle through...and curb our tendency to make full recipes instead of meals for two, which can make portion control an issue for us...you know, "Oh, I can't throw this away but I don't want leftovers..."

On a positive note: I've been Googling DASH and Mediterranean Diet recipes,and I'm impressed by the range and creavity...what a far cry from my mother's old diabetic recipe books. So I don't think we'll feel deprived of flavor by any means. If we discover any especially shareworthy ones I'll post them here. (I did clip a recipe for roasted chicken breasts, celery and potatoes that solves a perennial problem for us, namely how to use up celery before it goes bad...we'll have to taste-test that one soon.)

I'm also excited that we can finally share a diet plan. Because of our relative health issues we tend to run a "Jack Sprat" household where our dietary interests have often collided. But I think this will put us on a parallel, if not identical, track in terms of what/how we eat. I'm actually looking forward to this.

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Martha
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If you use celery in casseroles etc, I find chopping and freezing it on a foil-lined tray works well. Once it's frozen, throw it in a zip lock and pull out handfuls as you need it.
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Barnabas Aus
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LutheranChik, my son was 30 when diagnosed with high cholesterol and the dietitian put him on the Mediterranean diet. Combined with some judicious exercise, he lost 10 kilograms in short order, got his cholesterol under control, and has stayed well. I'm not able to exercise to the same extent, but have managed to lose up to 8 kilos, before a foot injury restricted my movement and I put a little bit back on. The diet is certainly flavoursome and colourful which helps.
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The Kat in the Hat
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quote:
Originally posted by Clotilde:
I wonder if kindly kitchen folk can help me.

We've a few large cooking apples here. I was wondering about putting them in the slow cooker.

Any suggestions how to do this - simple is good [Smile]

I made black butter - you make a basic apple sauce, but keep it cooking until it becomes really creamy & thick (& very dark in colour - hence the name). Family love it!

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Less is more ...

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Dunno about you, but what I crave in food at this time of year is Zing. Like this -

Salad dressing for anything green and/or crunchy. Particularly good over avocado.

Juice of half a lime
Half tsp caster sugar
Tbsp hot sauce
Salt & freshly-ground pepper

And to cheer up cold chicken

Tbsp light mayo
Tsp hot curry powder
Juice of half a lime
Tsp mango chutney
Salt & black pepper.

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Piglet
Islander
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I do more-or-less that with cold chicken, add halved seedless grapes and call it Coronation Chicken (which it sort of isn't, but it's really nice).

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Gee D
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We have the Constance Spry cookbook with the original Coronation Chicken recipe in it. It's an easy summer standby - make it in a full batch and keep half for a couple of days later, varying the salads with it and so forth.

Another in the same category is vitello tonnato. If there are 20 million cooks in Italy, there are 22 million one-and-only-authentic recipes for it, so the sauce can be changed a bit to suit what's on hand. The only essentials are the veal, tuna and anchovy. The trouble is that good veal is always hard to get here, and even more so in summer. The recipe can be modified to substitute pork, turkey breast, or even chicken.

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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Regarding using celery up before it goes bad: there is a simple solution - don't buy any. It is a useless vegetable and has no redeeming features whatsover.

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Even more so than I was before

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
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quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Regarding using celery up before it goes bad: there is a simple solution - don't buy any. It is a useless vegetable and has no redeeming features whatsover.

I have noticed that there are enormous variations in the flavor of the celery you buy in supermarkets. Some is delicious; some is downright inedible. There is one local supermarket chain whose celery is always edible and sometimes outstanding.

I can't think of anything else in the produce department that has such variations in flavor.

Moo

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Regarding using celery up before it goes bad: there is a simple solution - don't buy any. It is a useless vegetable and has no redeeming features whatsover.

It's the world's greatest aphrodisiac.

You don't eat it, you use it as a splint.

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Regarding using celery up before it goes bad: there is a simple solution - don't buy any. It is a useless vegetable and has no redeeming features whatsover.

It's the world's greatest aphrodisiac.

You don't eat it, you use it as a splint.

I remember when this thread used to be about cookery.
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Ariel
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# 58

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I don't like celery (the little slices look like caterpillars on a plate), but it is full of vitamins and very good for you. As a pureed ingredient in a soup it's not too bad.
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Sparrow
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# 2458

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quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Regarding using celery up before it goes bad: there is a simple solution - don't buy any. It is a useless vegetable and has no redeeming features whatsover.

Well it has one - it is supposed to contain fewer calories than are needed to digest it.

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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I find that celery adds a smooth flavor to hot or sharp tasting dishes. So in those I like it as in Cajun and Mexican recipes. But I really don't have any use for celery sticks as a diet snack, even if it does have effectively negative calories.

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I found some survived celery up the garden, but am not absolutely sure it is edible. (I had terrible trouble with the stuff over the last two years, it just faded away. But two plants seem to have survived just a bit.)
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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
... celery ... is a useless vegetable and has no redeeming features whatsover.

Not so long ago, I'd have agreed with you wholeheartedly about that, Pete, but I've discovered recently that the TV cooks are right - in tandem with onions and carrots it does lend a certain je ne sais quoi to stocks and casseroles.

A stick or two added when making stock does no harm at all (it's strained out at the end anyway) and if it's chopped finely enough it won't spoil the texture of a casserole.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Celery is one of the most lovely vegetables there is! I buy some pretty much every week. Good in salads and sandwiches, great chopped small and fried with mushrooms and onions, but totally vitally neccessary in casseroles, stews, and slow-cooked thingies.

If I was cooking almost any kind of stew or slow-cooking meat or veg I'd usually start by chopping up the onions and celery, while I ws thinking of what other ingerdients to use. Because they go in everything. Onions are more important than celery of course - without onions its hardly even a meal, celery just makes it taste nicer.

the nonsense about taking more energy to eat than you get from it is just, er, nonsense. Its niot exactly jam-packed with calories, but there are sugars in there.

And it does taste so nice. [Smile]

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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I like braised celery...oftentimes I just don't think of making it as a side dish until it's too late. I do like the idea of freezing the chopped celery for soups and stews...thank you! (I'm also trying juicing extra lemons and freezing the juice in an ice cube tray -- it seems we always have a lemon in the house until I actually need one for a recipe...)

One neat DASH trick I learned this week was to, when pan-sauteeing meat, put the meat aside when done, then make a reduction of balsamic vinegar and brown sugar -- like, 1/3 cup vinegar to 1 scant tablespoon brown sugar, scraping up any browned bits of goodness in the pan.

I tried this substituting maple syrup for the sugar when we had pork tenderloin chops last night, and it was wonderful...also good to sop up with one's starchy side dishes. (In our case, roasted diced butternut squash.)

Now if I only knew what to do with the half-dozen jars of non-low-fat gravy we bought awhile back in a fit of madness during the local supermarket's BOGO sale!

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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Palimpsest
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# 16772

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Celery is a wonderful flavor ingredient for soups. It's also nice as finger food, either healthily by itself or stuffed with cream cheese if you're a New Yorker and peanut butter if you're a southerner.

Celery is pretty salty but has other compounds that often lower blood pressure. I'm on a low salt diet, so I use it to add a little crunchy saltiness to a salad.

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