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Source: (consider it) Thread: Period Television
Baptist Trainfan
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Time has mercifully clouded any such recollection that I may ever have had.
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rolyn
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I have just noticed Ilya Kuryakin is 83.

I need to go away and whimper.

How strange. Was only thinking about him earlier and wondering if he was still around. My partner used to like him in the Man from Uncle. I always thought Robert Vaughan was cool.

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L'organist
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Is Illya Kuryakin still around!

Not only around but has just signed a new two year contract to continue as Dr Donald Mallard - aka Ducky - in NCIS.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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rolyn
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Apologies for arriving late to the Avengers. Have to say it was a big part of my childhood and I also watched them all/most again recently.... Well twice actually. [Hot and Hormonal] Even the opening music can transport me back to seemingly better days.

One thing striking was the brain washing theme that occurred in several episodes, bit of a 60s thing. Always remembered the one where they tried to get Tara King, (who I was deeply in love with, aged 8), to marry an elderly war veteran in order to get to release his hidden fortune. She was drugged making her believe it was WW1 and this old guy was in prime of life, when in fact he was ancient.
-----------------

What ever happened to the Likely Lads ? Brilliant.
The way that offset worked with flat-capped, caught in a time warp, Terry against newly-wed, here we come suburbia, Bob.--- just comedy magic. Amazed how amateur the production seems now aswell, with actors regularly stumbling over lines. Mind you just adds to the flavour.
All time favourite episode? Terry's no-good Uncle Jacob, recently departed, who he hero worshiped. Wouldn't want to put a spoiler on the ending [Biased]

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Teekeey Misha
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quote:
Originally posted by rolyn:
...Tara King, (who I was deeply in love with, aged 8)...

I was deeply in love with Mrs Peel aged 10. (I was ten, not she, obviously!) Mind you, I was also very taken with Steed. Sadly, my parents were horribly repressive of my youthful yearnings and refused to buy their ten year old son a bowler hat or a black "gentleman's walker"*.

[*ETA I was well into my twenties before I satisfied my urges by the purchase of both the hat and the umbrella!]

[ 25. September 2016, 10:50: Message edited by: Teekeey Misha ]

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Misha
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rolyn
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Always remembered Steed's steel-plated bowler being more of a feature. Nostalgia was brought up short on re-watch and only seeing it used in self defence a couple of times.

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Eigon
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I wanted to BE Emma Peel.
Or Sharon McCready from The Champions - I always fancied the Champions' ability to communicate (I presume it was some sort of ESP).

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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Does anyone else remember a British kids' series called "The Double-deckers"? Not sure when it was made, but it was on syndicated US TV back in the 60s. Focused on kids who used an old double-decker bus as a clubhouse, and also their classroom time.

Also good: "H.R. Pufnstuff", "Beanie & Cecil", "Rocky and Bullwinkle", "Yogi Bear", and "The Friendly Giant". Oh, and "Romper Room".

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--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by rolyn:
Always remembered Steed's steel-plated bowler being more of a feature. Nostalgia was brought up short on re-watch and only seeing it used in self defence a couple of times.

My school was not far from the studios where "The Avengers" was made, and there was great excitement a couple of times when it was used for filming.

Of course we were kept well away from the action and never saw anything or anybody - but we still looked out for familiar landmarks when the episodes were screened!

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no prophet's flag is set so...

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May I introduce a little bit of Canadian TV from 3 decades. Same genre - the outdoors and wilderness - all with a mix of white people and indigenous - and all with theme music we could all identify.

The first is The Forest Rangers from the 1960s. A groups of kids lived in a fort in the semi-wilderness and sorted out the problems of the park rangers, local indigenous people. It's a bit like Narnia meets a moose, with Joe Two-Rivers as an quaint indigenous Aslan. I encourage you to click on the link, which is youtube, to at least listen to the theme.

In the 1970s, the CBC updated the genre to Rainbow Country, which has a more exciting motif. Click the youtube link for the theme and if you like an episode. They get a float plane and a Quebecois love interest for the mother of the fishing lodge.

By the 1980s, they did it in drama-sitcom style with The Beachcombers. Moving west to the coast of BC. The wilderness is being exploited and the characters compete in the real world.

All of these were top-rated shows in their day.

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(formerly known more succinctly as "no prophet"), either way not be taken seriously. \_(ツ)_/

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Teekeey Misha
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I think you've linked the second one twice.

The Beachcombers is here.

I remember watching it here in the UK when we had family visits to my grandmother for Sunday lunch. Watching the Canadians doing odd things with logs was FAR more fun than talking with the aged ones!

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Misha
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Eigon
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I remember the Double Deckers, Golden Key!
There was a kid who invented things - I seem to remember a hovercraft in one episode, which set off by accident with the youngest little girl in it. Over the radio, they told her to press the button on her left side, but she was too young to have learned left and right.
"The side where you hold your spoon!" they said.
"But I'm not holding a spoon!!!"

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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Ah children's TV - we're going back to the days of visibly-stringed puppets and narration by a terribly nice English gel. Remember the Woodentops?. And Torchy the Battery Boy - who looks unsettlingly like an early run for the demonic Chuckie. I don't think I liked it much at the time even.

Apart from Crackerjack (It's Friday! It's 5 o'clock!) I can't really recall much. I think because for me the really visceral early memories are from listening to the radio. Nothing TV could do at the time could deliver the frisson of Journey into Space.

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by Fredegund:
The Professionals _ Doyle, of course.
But he's aged awfully well too, think of the later P D James adaptations.

Not to mention Judge John Deed.

**drool** [Hot and Hormonal]

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Teekeey Misha
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Apart from Crackerjack (It's Friday! It's 5 o'clock!) I can't really recall much.

I think it was not "5 o'clock" but rather "It's Friday! It's five-to-five! It's CRACKERJACK!"

I do remember the Doubledeckers - or at least I remember the theme tune and lots of kids larking around on a bus. That's about all I remember of it.

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Misha
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Golden Key
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Theme lyrics, IIRC:

Get on board, get on board,
Get on board with the Double-deckers.
Take a ticket for a journey
On a double-decker London bus!

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

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Firenze

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quote:
Originally posted by Teekeey Misha:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Apart from Crackerjack (It's Friday! It's 5 o'clock!) I can't really recall much.

I think it was not "5 o'clock" but rather "It's Friday! It's five-to-five! It's CRACKERJACK!"

That was Later. In the beginning, it began at 5 o'clock. That was the traditional hour for children's programming, inherited, I fancy, from radio. I remember the sense of disturbance when they started earlier. Jackanory was a significant feature, beginning 15 minutes before the 'proper' time. Then that moved to 20 to 5, main children's programme 5 to 5, then didn't the National News begin at 10 to 6? Or am I imagining that?
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Baptist Trainfan
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And DO NOT FORGET "The Magic Roundabout", squeezed in just before the News!

Everyone lauds "Jackanory" these days. I thought it was dull. But I liked "Blue Peter" - we always tried to guess the carefully-concealed brand name on the cereal packets or washing-up liquid containers used for the crafts.

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Teekeey Misha
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
That was Later. In the beginning, it began at 5 o'clock.

Ah. I'm obviously far too young to remember that. [Big Grin]


quote:
...then didn't the National News begin at 10 to 6? Or am I imagining that?
I remember the news being at 5:45. It struck me at the time that it would be far more sensible to have the news at six o'clock because "This is the BBC News at six o'clock" sounded far more impressive than "This is the BBC News at five forty five." I notice nowadays that (if the news is shunted from its 6pm slot) they say, "This is the early evening news from the BBC", which seems terribly insipid. It lacks the portent of "This is the BBC News at six o'clock".

There used to be a cartoon between the end of the "main" programme (Blue Peter/Grange Hill) and the beginning of the news. When I was in the VIth form, there was always a mad scramble getting to a good seat in common room between the end of the last lesson and the beginning of "Willo the Wisp". (We watched it for the social satire. Honestly... [Hot and Hormonal] )

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Misha
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The Phantom Flan Flinger
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quote:
Originally posted by Teekeey Misha:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
That was Later. In the beginning, it began at 5 o'clock.

Ah. I'm obviously far too young to remember that. [Big Grin]


quote:
...then didn't the National News begin at 10 to 6? Or am I imagining that?
I remember the news being at 5:45. It struck me at the time that it would be far more sensible to have the news at six o'clock because "This is the BBC News at six o'clock" sounded far more impressive than "This is the BBC News at five forty five." I notice nowadays that (if the news is shunted from its 6pm slot) they say, "This is the early evening news from the BBC", which seems terribly insipid. It lacks the portent of "This is the BBC News at six o'clock".

There used to be a cartoon between the end of the "main" programme (Blue Peter/Grange Hill) and the beginning of the news. When I was in the VIth form, there was always a mad scramble getting to a good seat in common room between the end of the last lesson and the beginning of "Willo the Wisp". (We watched it for the social satire. Honestly... [Hot and Hormonal] )

ITN news was at 5.45, BBC Early Evening News (yes, they did call it that), was at 5.40.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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Which is just wrong. News happens at 1 o'clock, 6 o'clock and 9 o'clock as it was ordained from the beginning.

My mother would look for the 9 o'clock news loooong after it had departed. There being no daytime television during the week, we always listened to the 1 o'clock on the radio. After which we had to retune to RTE - or Radio Athlone as it was in those days - to hear the southern Irish version. Part of the soundtrack of my childhood is the Fat Stock prices and the advertisement for Galtee cheese.

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Teekeey Misha
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quote:
Originally posted by The Phantom Flan Flinger:ITN news was at 5.45, BBC Early Evening News (yes, they did call it that), was at 5.40.
I have no reason to doubt you, but I guarantee that ITN didn't come it. We didn't watch "the other side" *sniff* in our household. If it wasn't on Aunty it wasn't worth watching...

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Misha
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Teekeey Misha
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
My mother would look for the 9 o'clock news loooong after it had departed.

Because it makes far more sense than this new-fangled palaver of starting the "evening post-watershed movie" at 2100hrs, then stopping it at 2200hrs for the news, then starting it again - not even at 2230hrs when the news ends, but at 2240hrs when the "local" news has finished too.

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Misha
Don't assume I don't care; sometimes I just can't be bothered to put you right.

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Baptist Trainfan
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... Until ITV produced "Do Not Adjust Your Set" in the late 60s.
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Carex
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quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
... "Rocky and Bullwinkle"...

A truly creative and transformative show with an attitude, full of adult jokes, awful puns, and characters who talked back to the narrator. I was disappointed, however, to find that the archived shows on Netflix didn't include the other associated cartoons such as Dudley Doright.

"Must get moose'n'squirrel!" still gets quoted around our household occasionally when we're focused on accomplishing something.

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Ariel
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
There being no daytime television during the week, we always listened to the 1 o'clock on the radio. After which we had to retune to RTE - or Radio Athlone as it was in those days - to hear the southern Irish version. Part of the soundtrack of my childhood is the Fat Stock prices and the advertisement for Galtee cheese.

As part of mine is the sound of the Six O'Clock Angelus (which they still broadcast) before the news.

But yes, news should be at 1, 6 and 9, how else do you know where you are with the world.

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rolyn
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Dad always had "the World at One" with William Hardcastle on the radio. Then, having been fiddling around outdoors in the evening, he'd often come in for another dose of gloom from ITV's News at Ten.

As a kid I remember Robert Dougal coming on after Magic Roundabout, with news often dominated by the joys of the Vietnam war and other similarly uplifting items.

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by rolyn:
... As a kid I remember Robert Dougal ...

As was the case with several of his colleagues, he was never quite the same after an encounter with Morecambe & Wise. [Killing me]

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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L'organist
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We always had to watch anything like a royal wedding with the sound turned right down so our papa wouldn't blow a gasket at the errors littering the commentary by Richard Dimbleby.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Jante
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Anyone else remember Time Slip- I still have fondest memories of it.

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rolyn
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I remember Timeslip. Youngsters were able to crawl through the wire fence and enter the future/ past but adults could not.
One episode when, in the future, the immortality pills which held off advancing age failed did spook me somewhat.

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Hedgehog

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I realize I am resurrecting a long-dead thread, but because, for Christmas, I received a DVD collection of the first season of "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea," I feel justified.

This is a series that begs to be re-made. Space exploration series have become too common, but life in a sub below the water can still feel like an unknown quantity.

The first season was focussed more on espionage and Cold War themes that I think could be re-tooled for a modern age. The later season were (unfortunately) more in the monster-of-the-week mode, but using the first season as a template, I think this could be re-made quite successfully.

Of course, updating would be needed. The original series was set roughly twelve in the future...or the late 1970s-early 1980s. Despite that, the crew of the USS Seaview is exclusively white males. Of course, after several years of a Trump presidency, maybe that will be an accurate reflection of the future--but I sincerely hope not. [Smile]

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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H--

Did you ever see "Seaquest", back in the '90s? (It became "Seaquest DSV", after some changes.) Also a submarine adventure, and really good.

I'm not necessarily for remaking old shows, particularly ones I liked! A lot gets lost, or becomes a spoof. (As with the movie versions of "Starsky & Hutch".)

I liked "Voyage", and have caught a couple reruns on a retro station. But yes, it did get to the point where it cycled through "who was possessed?", "who disappeared?", and "what's that strange creature?".

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

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rolyn
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quote:
Originally posted by Hedgehog:
I realize I am resurrecting a long-dead thread, but because, for Christmas, I received a DVD collection of the first season of "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea," I feel justified.

Myself and two older brothers were VttBotS fans.
That, and Lost in Space. A peculiar 'Swiss family Robinson' in space thing. Very much of it's age which meant the remake couldn't really recapture it.

I've learnt recently that many a young female of my peer group lost their heart to Captain Crane from Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. The 60s was a unique decade in so many ways.

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Eigon
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# 4917

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I quite fancied Captain Crane, too - and although the crew of the Seaview was all white and male, it was always the crewman with the Polish name who died first!

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

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Anselmina
Ship's barmaid
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quote:
Originally posted by Mili:


As to teeth, I never really noticed those. I just find the Jane Austen heroes of the 90s and 00s the most attractive and don't find the actors from the earlier adaptions to be good looking enough. Even the cads.

You see, you prove my point right there! This is the generation of plastic fantastic. You find them more attractive, I find them unbelievable in their roles and therefore distracting from the action.

Austen, eg, wrote about relatively ordinary people, good-looking enough perhaps, but not the extravagantly groomed, plumped, lifted, botoxed creations that routinely pass for actors these days. If I can't even believe that who I'm looking at is really 'real', how can I believe in the character they're playing?! It's just a personal thing!

The Granada produced 'Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' with the wonderful Jeremy Brett is perhaps my favourite period TV. They didn't always stick to the letter of the stories, but always to the spirit of them. And period feel seemed absolutely bang on, so far as I could tell.

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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A retro station ran a couple of episodes of "Square Pegs" tonight! And another station ran one of my fave eps of "MacGyver"! ("Ugly Duckling".)
[Yipee]

Tangentially, local PBS station is doing a massive "Downton" marathon--entire series this week from 8 am into the evening.

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Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
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Square Pegs? Square Pegs? Square, Square--PEGS? [Yipee]

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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Nothing. Ever. Quite. Right!
[Cool]

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

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rolyn
Shipmate
# 16840

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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
This is the generation of plastic fantastic. You find them more attractive, I find them unbelievable in their roles and therefore distracting from the action.

Austen, eg, wrote about relatively ordinary people, good-looking enough perhaps, but not the extravagantly groomed, plumped, lifted, botoxed creations that routinely pass for actors these days. If I can't even believe that who I'm looking at is really 'real', how can I believe in the character they're playing?! It's just a personal thing!

Sometimes I purposely watch mediocre films or productions from the late 60s -- early 70s simply to get away from "plastic fantastic". This was the era when females at their most beautiful IMHO. Anyone looking for attractive males would probably need to go back even further.

Coming back to Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea I forgotten about the poor Poles copping out. At least with Star Trek the ones with a target on their chest were defined by dress. A red jumper posed a high risk of being atomised within 10 minutes of arriving on a new planet.

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Mili:
[qb]Austen, eg, wrote about relatively ordinary people, good-looking enough perhaps, but not the extravagantly groomed, plumped, lifted, botoxed creations that routinely pass for actors these days.

No.

Not really.

Asten's fiction was written at a time when the country was at war, a war that did not get mentioned in the books. It is pure escapism.

If you enjoy Austen then enjoy it for the escapism it is, or for its satire on the manners of the day. But please, please don't call it realistic. It was never meant to be that.

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Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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quote:
Originally posted by rolyn:
Coming back to Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea I forgotten about the poor Poles copping out. At least with Star Trek the ones with a target on their chest were defined by dress. A red jumper posed a high risk of being atomised within 10 minutes of arriving on a new planet.

I had forgotten the Pole Death Rate as well. It was a far more subtle indicator than Star Trek's Red Shirt Cannon Fodder.

I remember Seaquest DSV. In many ways, I think that was an attempt to update Voyage, but I never liked the know-it-all brat (essentially, Wesley Crusher before ST:TNG).

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Anselmina
Ship's barmaid
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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Mili:
[qb]Austen, eg, wrote about relatively ordinary people, good-looking enough perhaps, but not the extravagantly groomed, plumped, lifted, botoxed creations that routinely pass for actors these days.

No.

Not really.

Asten's fiction was written at a time when the country was at war, a war that did not get mentioned in the books. It is pure escapism.

If you enjoy Austen then enjoy it for the escapism it is, or for its satire on the manners of the day. But please, please don't call it realistic. It was never meant to be that.

What a confusing response. I'm not sure I even know what you mean. What is it I'm supposed to be calling 'realistic'?

My objection to some modern dramatic attempts at recreating Austen is with some of the actors used. I'm willing to suspend disbelief of course. But that is hard to do when the actors involved have so obviously had 'work done', and/or have make-up and hairstyles which have nothing to do with the era. I don't think it's a bad thing to have 'realistic' representations of the era being portrayed. And I'm not going to apologise for preferring period realism in a drama to lack of realism. That is the 'realism', clearly, I'm talking about.

And why should a romantic novelist write about war, unless she wants to? Her military characters - of which there were quite a number - were completely in keeping with her theme of quite ordinary, but interesting stories about quite ordinary but interesting middle-class people. Just like herself and her circle. That was her genius, in fact. To write perceptively, wittily, and sometimes critically, about the social manners of her time.

By all means you may read her for any amount of escapism you derive from it. Most novels, surely, are read for some element of escapism. I like Austen because she writes, with a fair amount of contemporary critique, of times of a bygone era, in an entertaining and authentic way. That's why I read Austen's books, if it's all the same to you.

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Dafyd
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# 5549

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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Asten's fiction was written at a time when the country was at war, a war that did not get mentioned in the books. It is pure escapism.

If you enjoy Austen then enjoy it for the escapism it is, or for its satire on the manners of the day. But please, please don't call it realistic. It was never meant to be that.

The early books were written during The Napoleonic Wars. The Napoleonic Wars were very much an on and off thing, and despite the odd scare, England was never under serious threat. The wars hardly show up in Austen's biography, for example.
A number of characters in Persuasion have been active in naval service.

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
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Pride and Prejudice features the militia being stationed locally - and the effects on the local society.

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
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This thread on period television only just caught my eye - I wonder if you fans of old productions might be interested to glance at what some remarkably skilled people (not me!) choose to watch them on!

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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Mark--

Way cool! Thanks for that.

It tangentially reminds me of something called "slow-scan TV", back in the 1970s. Back-to-the-land folks wanted a way to send pictures to each other, over the air. Don't remember how it worked, but there's probably info online. I think "Mother Earth News" magazine had articles, back then.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

Posts: 16759 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged



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