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Source: (consider it) Thread: Chillies, peppers and gingers
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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Yes, ice cream will work - anything fatty will do the job - but a sorbet won't!

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Og, King of Bashan

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I'd like some advice: the current jar of chilli powder in the cupboard chez Piglet is labelled "Ancho" (I think it just happened to be what D. bought in the supermarket).

It's very dark-coloured, and D., who uses it to flavour the oil he fries onions in to make cheesy potato mash, said he was wary of overdoing it, as it looked a bit fierce.

How does it differ from ordinary chilli powder?

I'll expand a bit on my answer.

Ancho peppers are dried Poblano peppers. Poblanos are big, meaty peppers, with a little more heat and flavor than bell peppers, but a step below Anaheims in terms of heat. Poblanos are often served stuffed, or cut into strips and on a tortilla with just a little cheese.

Anchos have a sweet, earthy taste, and less heat than standard store brand chili powder. You hear comparisons to dark stone fruits, and fresh tobacco. Anchos are one of the main launching off points if you want to go away from American-style Mexican food and toward Mexican style Mexican food. I think it has only been in the last few years that mainstream American grocery stores have carried Ancho powder.

The other cautionary note is that store-brand chili powder is often something more than just chili- it often contains salt, granulated garlic, oregano, or other herbs and spices. So it won't necessarily be a perfect 1 to 1 substitution.

I'd play around with it, and if you don't like it in the recipe it was intended for, it makes for a good meat rub along with coriander, cumin, garlic, Mexican oregano, and salt, and if you add some vinegar to that rub and marinade some thin strips of pork or chicken, you are on your way to some awesome street-style tacos.

[ 25. October 2016, 15:09: Message edited by: Og, King of Bashan ]

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Piglet
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Thanks, Og - that was more-or-less the answer I expected - I had a feeling that "smokiness" came into the equation somewhere. In practical terms, it probably means we can be a bit less wimpy about it. [Big Grin]

eta: I'll second what people are saying about milky things as a cooling agent when eating curries or chillies - cucumber-and-yoghurt raita is lovely with Indian-style curries, and if I'm ordering Mexican food, I nearly always ask for extra soured cream, which moderates things nicely.

[ 25. October 2016, 22:19: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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Lyda*Rose

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My favorite way of eating food above my scoville scale limits (up to a wimpy 10,000 units [Hot and Hormonal] ) is to add sour cream, yogurt, or crema as a garnish. That way I can enjoy the burn from a safe distance.

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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lilBuddha
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quote:
Originally posted by Og, King of Bashan:

I'd play around with it, and if you don't like it in the recipe it was intended for, it makes for a good meat rub along with coriander, cumin, garlic, Mexican oregano, and salt, and if you add some vinegar to that rub and marinade some thin strips of pork or chicken, you are on your way to some awesome street-style tacos.

And cocoa powder. Not too much, 30 grams/2 tablespoons, it gives the rub or sauce a richer flavour.

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Ariel
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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
No, that wasn't what I was thinking at all (on that front, the worst I've done is get a finger a bit near my eyes when I scratched an itch with inadequately-washed hands.)

I thought of that this morning as I hurried to the station realizing all too late that I'd just put in my contact lens with fingers I thought I'd washed well enough but which still evidently had a trace of chilli sauce on them.

There's not a lot you can do about that when it's dark and you're hurrying along a gritty street, except make a mental note to be more careful next time.

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Pancho
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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
What's your take on chillies, peppers and ginger in food or drink? The more the merrier, or not for you? Are you happy at the further end of the Scoville scale, or is a mere glance from a distance enough? Are any of these kitchen essentials for you, or do you prefer life without them?

(The general heading also includes such things as peri-peri and harissa. If it sets fire to your palate, it's in there.)

I'm Mexican(-American) so for me, chilies are a matter of personal identity as much as they are of cooking. I'm not even joking. The phrase "Mexicans eat chile" is something I heard often growing up. We would always bring back chilies on our trips to Mexico, either canned or bags of roasted and dried chilies. There always were chilies around the house and all different kinds were easy to get in our neighborhood.

I don't eat it all that much (not like some people in my family) but that being said, I'll reach for the hot sauce or salsa as often as not. A lot of food just tastes bland to me without a little bit of chile so for me it is a kitchen essential. I don't need it to be very hot. It's more about the flavor.

My favorite dish is enchiladas which by definition has chile:
quote:
The Real Academia Española defines the word enchilada, as used in Mexico, as a rolled maize tortilla stuffed with meat and covered with a tomato and chili sauce.[1][2] Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, "to add chili pepper to", literally to "season (or decorate) with chili".[3]
My mom makes the enchilada sauce with chocolate, among other ingredients.

P.S.
Oh yeah, if something is too spicy eat some tortilla or bread, or have or drink some dairy food (milk, sour cream, etc.) That usually does the trick. It's always a good idea to have some sour cream on the side for this or to add to food to tone down the spice.

[ 04. November 2016, 03:02: Message edited by: Pancho ]

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“But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the market places and calling to their playmates, ‘We piped to you, and you did not dance;
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Lyda*Rose

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Love enchiladas! Yesterday I went to a Dia de los Muertas celebration and had chicken mole (red chile and chocolate sauce) enchiladas for lunch. And to top it off I ordered delicious fried plantains in dulce leche sauce for dessert. Oh. My. God. [Yipee]

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Pancho
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Love enchiladas! Yesterday I went to a Dia de los Muertas celebration and had chicken mole (red chile and chocolate sauce) enchiladas for lunch. And to top it off I ordered delicious fried plantains in dulce leche sauce for dessert. Oh. My. God. [Yipee]

Sorry, I kept forgetting about this thread but yes, enchiladas are awesome and I'm craving some right now. The other night I had some spicy nachos with cheese that were surprisingly good and tasted like they also had chorizo. Mexican chorizo is usually spicier and crumblier than the Spanish kind and goes good with everything. I need to ask some family members to show me how to make it.

Lyda*Rose, you must know that in Southern California it's not that hard to find street vendors selling fresh fruit like mangoes sprinkled with chili or corn on the cob slathered in mayonnaise and sprinkled with chili. Oh, and the fried plantains you mentioned: I had some a while back made with some kind of cream but yours with dulce de leche sound just as good. I loved dulce de leche as a child, specifically that kind made with goat's milk we call cajeta.

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“But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the market places and calling to their playmates, ‘We piped to you, and you did not dance;
we wailed, and you did not mourn.’"

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Latchkey Kid
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We grow a few varieties of chilli - chocolate habanero, birds eye, dutch bonnet etc. We have jars of chilli jam for when we can't pick them fresh from the garden. We use them in stir-fries, and curries, and sometimes sliced raw in a vietnamese style dipping sauce for rice-paper rolls (spring rolls that are not deep fries).

LKKelderson always carries a bottle of chilli or tabasco sauce in case he finds the meals too bland.

PS. The heat doesn't seem to affect Currawongs. If we are not careful they will strip a bush of the ripe birdseye chillis.

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Latchkey Kid
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Ginger I use in curries and stir-fries, and I like stem ginger in syrup.

Capsicums/peppers I like best in Mediterranean vegetables. I roast/char them on the BBQ with eggplant/aubergine/melanzane and zucchini/courgettes sprinkled with a dressing of olive oil and perhaps garlic or lemon juice or balsamic vinegar.

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'You must never give way for an answer. An answer is always the stretch of road that's behind you. Only a question can point the way forward.'
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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
The heat doesn't seem to affect Currawongs. If we are not careful they will strip a bush of the ripe birdseye chillis.

Make sure that you don't have a mulberry tree nearby. The aperient effect of the chillis added to the usual problem with mulberries would be disastrous.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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I was once told that the best way to preserve chopped fresh ginger was in a very dry sherry in a jar in the fridge. I never had enough sherry left over to try it but it sounds good.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I was once told that the best way to preserve chopped fresh ginger was in a very dry sherry in a jar in the fridge. I never had enough sherry left over to try it but it sounds good.

60 or more years ago, fresh ginger was a rare commodity here and preservation in dry sherry was the accepted way of dealing with what had not been used. At the end, the well flavoured sherry went into the dish as well. Not by any means authentic cookery of any Chinese tradition, but it worked well.

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Lothlorien
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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I was once told that the best way to preserve chopped fresh ginger was in a very dry sherry in a jar in the fridge. I never had enough sherry left over to try it but it sounds good.

Some years ago I ordered ginger in my grocery order. I expected what I thought would be a misshapen lump roughly as big as a large thumb.

The picker obviously had no idea what he was doing. I was charged a small amount but when I opened bag, there was almost a kilo of ginger. I bought the sherry and chopped ginger into it. It worked well and the sherry tasted good too, much better than I usually expect sherry to taste. I am not a fan of it. I wondered about brandy as well but probably would not have used it often enough to justify the use.

[ 14. December 2016, 20:16: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Hilda of Whitby
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I love 'em all (chiles, peppers, ginger), and in winter I drink a concoction called "fire cider"--raw apple cider, honey, oranges, lemons, onions, ginger, horseradish, habañero pepper, garlic, and turmeric. I use it as an overall tonic, and it can stop an incipient cold dead in its tracks. A tablespoon for a daily tonic, and for a cold-stopper, a jigger. There are recipes galore on the internet but I buy it locally. How did I manage without it?

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Graven Image
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I have upped my heat intake from zero to now like food medium hot. The one thing I do not like is being served heat without warning in food that is usually not spicy. No do not put peppers into my meat loaf or beef stew. I like the flavor of ginger very much from drinks, candy, to food. Yum

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
.... At the end, the well flavoured sherry went into the dish as well. Not by any means authentic cookery of any Chinese tradition, but it worked well.

Possibly not authentic, but not a bad substitute for Chinese rice-wine. If I'm making a stir-fry, I start with garlic and ginger, add all the bits and pieces and make a sort of slurry with soy sauce, cornflour and dry sherry if I have any (or a slosh of white wine if I haven't).

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
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...but, pray tell, how many sloshes does the average white wine glass hold?

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details


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Stercus Tauri
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A few years ago I had the great good fortune to be referred to an Indian gastro-enterologist, and we soon found a common interest in spices and what might be done with them. I had to take it easy with the WMD grade chilli at the time, and discovered the delights of ginger instead - a continuing pleasure. Last night I craved something that I could not quite define, and allowed the spirit (or something) to move me... I took a large cup of plain yoghurt, with a teaspoon of dried ginger and some maple syrup to sweeten it just a little, all well stirred, of course. Sheer bliss!

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
...but, pray tell, how many sloshes does the average white wine glass hold?

That may depend on the desired level of sloshedness ... [Big Grin]

For stir-frying purposes, a "slosh" is probably no more than a couple of tablespoons.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 17922 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
neandergirl

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quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
A few years ago I had the great good fortune to be referred to an Indian gastro-enterologist, and we soon found a common interest in spices and what might be done with them. I had to take it easy with the WMD grade chilli at the time, and discovered the delights of ginger instead - a continuing pleasure. Last night I craved something that I could not quite define, and allowed the spirit (or something) to move me... I took a large cup of plain yoghurt, with a teaspoon of dried ginger and some maple syrup to sweeten it just a little, all well stirred, of course. Sheer bliss!

Oooh, must try this.

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Carex
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We love hot and/or spicy food, but unfortunately at this point the alliums (onion, garlic, etc.) don't particularly like us. All too often when we ask a restaurant for something without onions or garlic, we get a dish that isn't at all spicy.
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