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Source: (consider it) Thread: Movie thread
Nicolemr
Shipmate
# 28

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Just saw Spiderman: Homecoming. The best word I can think of to describe it is "cute". I liked it, it wasn't great, but it was fun and cute.

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On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

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Kaplan Corday
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# 16119

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Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

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simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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Dunkirk was the first film I have seen at the Cinema since running screaming from the theatre after the recent Star Wars reboot. I felt it was an excellent film, giving great encouragement to men with bald spots. Mark Rylance FTUW

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Human

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churchgeek

Have candles, will pray
# 5557

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Has anyone seen "Detroit"? I'm planning to go tomorrow night. I'm curious what anyone not from Detroit might think of it.

(I do wish they'd given it a better title, though.)

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I reserve the right to change my mind.

My article on the Virgin of Vladimir

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Eigon
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# 4917

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I happened to hear one of the Proms season, which started with Korngold's wonderful score for The Sea Hawk, so I curled up for a nostalgic re-watch. I was pleasantly surprised to see it pass the Bechdel Test (Queen Elizabeth talks to Donna Maria, and Donna Maria talks to her maid Miss Latham, and not always about Captain Thorpe), and Donna Maria (Brenda Marshall doing her best Olivia de Havilland impression) actively trying to warn Captain Thorpe that his secret plan has been discovered, and helping him get the secret dispatches to the Queen at the climax.
I also enjoyed the way that the climactic sword fight was cut so that it looked as if Henry Daniell had a clue about what he was doing!

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

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lilBuddha
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# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

No brown people...

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So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

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Stercus Tauri
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# 16668

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I didn't see Dunkirk yesterday. After half an hour of increasingly loud and violent commercials and trailers, plus choking on the dreadful popcorn fog, I left. My dear wife said it was good, but I thoroughly enjoyed the time outside on a beautifully cool summer evening, reading an excellent book.

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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That's why, when we lived elsewhere, we tended to wait for films to come to the local Film Theatre rather than going to see them at the Multiplex. It was a far more agreeable experience (and, if you think I'm saying that "a better class of viewer went to the film theatre", you're probably right!)
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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Over the last few days I have re-watched The Lord of the Rings for about the 173rd time - I must confess that my comments get a tad more unrepeatable every time but I still enjoy it.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
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What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Kaplan Corday
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# 16119

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quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

No brown people...
Yes, they were certainly part of the British component, though a very small proportion.

https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-08-02/there-were-indian-troops-dunkirk-too

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Twilight

Puddleglum's sister
# 2832

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quote:
all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.


Now I'm thinking I may be able to go see it after all.

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
quote:
all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.
Now I'm thinking I may be able to go see it after all.
If you're like me in this regard, and I suspect you are, you can see this movie. I pass by pretty much any film with an R for violence, but this is PG-rated. The deaths aren't depicted realistically.
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Cathscats
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# 17827

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I saw Dunkirk last week with my teenage son. I expected to have to shut my eyes a lot, but didn't. I didn't find it totally gripping, but it was certainly watchable. Actually, I think the teenage son was the best audience for it. He was entirely enthralled and full of reflective questions later.

I did fear that the end was going to be a bit too much "Land of Hope and Glory" -ish but they reigned it in just in time.

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"...damp hands and theological doubts - the two always seem to go together..." (O. Douglas, "The Setons")

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lilBuddha
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# 14333

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Christopher Nolan stripped most of the carnage of the real Dunkirk in order to tell stories. The result is a war film for a broader audience.
Like most films of this nature, don't look to it as an history, but history adjacent.
A major negative for me was the score. Whilst Hans Zimmer didn't drive the viewers into shrieking madness as he did in Intersteller, the Sheppard tone is overused. Though this might be under Nolan's direction.

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So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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quote:
Originally posted by Bene Gesserit:
quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
Just watched Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, the unlikely tale of a municipality connected to a large number of celestial bodies.

We're still hmm-ing and ha-ing about how much or whether we want to see that one. What did you think of it?
Because it's still in theaters . . .
It's not just another Besson film. It's also another French 1970's sci-fi comic book. Which, granted, have influenced . . . well, lots of people . . . but keep in mind: this is a genre where Barbarella was a genuine epoch-making work.

High points of French 1970's Sci-Fi-Comic Books: gorgeous scenery. Sometimes strange, mind-bending themes. Great influence on everything from Star Wars to Nausicaa. Did we mention the scenery? It's gorgeous.

Low points: anything resembling a coherent plot. Depth of characters.

The best F70SFCB's, like Mobeus, don't even try to bother with dialogue or coherent plots. Sometimes, they just embrace the surrealism and run with it. They don't have plot holes or lazy, pastiche charactarizations; no, they're absurdist, trope-subverting fantasies!

If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great. There are a few shots that are lifted straight from Mobeus and his contemporaries (like the helmets in the desert scenes—could swear I've seen those in Airtight Garage), a few others that look like they were meant for dual-page spreads in a full-color album. Gorgeous, imaginative, and sometimes absurd.

If you actually want something that looks like someone thought about the screenplay beyond setting up a world to explore . . . sorry. Not in this genre.

As for Detroit . . . it strikes me as a Socially Conscious Movie. Like, not one with a social conscience. More one that lets you feel Outraged about what Other People Have Done while watching Other People get beat up, shot, and stripped naked. A bit of an overt awards bid cloaked in shock and violence. Which is not to say shocking and violent events don't or didn't happen—but that they can be handled in a way that doesn't exploit them for our lurid viewing pleasure. I don't know which side of the line Detroit winds up on, but it's pretty close either way.

[ 10. August 2017, 22:36: Message edited by: Ariston ]

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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RooK

1 of 6
# 1852

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Snuck out to see Atomic Blonde, the retro tale of an intensely powerful female with light-coloured hair.
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RooK

1 of 6
# 1852

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:
If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great.

Your description encapsulates the mind space well. If you love looking for visual detail and are amused by metaphorical puns, this movie delivers the genre goods. Otherwise, VATCOATP is going to seem like a mishmash with no compelling point.

On the topic of Atomic Blonde - holy shit the soundtrack. People who remember the 80's will either love it, or die miserable and lonely for lack of having a soul. And the fight scenes are considerably more effective than most action movies; a testament to Theron's raw talent and Leitch's compelling inclusion of entropy.

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lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:
If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great.

Your description encapsulates the mind space well. If you love looking for visual detail and are amused by metaphorical puns, this movie delivers the genre goods. Otherwise, VATCOATP is going to seem like a mishmash with no compelling point.

On the topic of Atomic Blonde - holy shit the soundtrack. People who remember the 80's will either love it, or die miserable and lonely for lack of having a soul. And the fight scenes are considerably more effective than most action movies; a testament to Theron's raw talent and Leitch's compelling inclusion of entropy.

For shame. Andy Kaufman is going to haunt you.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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In a fit of [more than usual] insanity I decided to watch the first of the Harry Potter movies last night - I remembered it was bad but had forgotten how bad it was! The disc had a fault so I only saw up to the end of the troll scene and then gave up. John Hurt, Alan Rickman and Maggie Smith were the only redeeming features.

Quoth the raven "Nevermore!"

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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My kids (esp the younger, just 10) love them. I've seen some much, much, much poorer kids' films. (Worst so far? Probably an excrescence called 'Home'). I'm going to miss kids films as they both get older.

We just watched the Lego Batman Movie. Which is OK, but I don't think it would stand 2 viewings as the Lego Movie did.

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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quote:
Alan Rickman
(Oh - and the films have been useful in that when the neighbours' kids throw shit into my garden - mostly broken toys and dismembered remains of their grandmother's plastic bushes (don't ask) - and I ask them to desist, my kids say that 'Dad has his Snape-voice on again'...)

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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I have returned from the annual Capitolfest movie festival, this year honoring Fay Wray. This year, the feature films were made between 1918 (Little Orphant Annie) and 1934 (The Countess of Monte Cristo and White Lies). There may have been shorts from later years.

As a surprise this year, it was attended by Fay Wray’s daughter, Victoria Riskin. Probably not a coincidence, but she has a memoir about her mother scheduled to be published later this year. Still, her presence highlights just how hard the festival works to find rare movies to show: Ms. Riskin admitted that a couple of the films starring her mother she had never seen (including the previously mentioned The Countess of Monte Cristo)!

Normally I note what films from the festival I’d like to have on DVD. Unfortunately, this year the only one that would go on the list happens to be one that I already own: The Four Feathers (1929). But that doesn’t mean that there was nothing of interest.

For example, there was one called Cheer Up and Smile (1930), which was almost instantly forgettable...except for the fact that it had John Wayne in an uncredited bit part. I found it a bit shocking to realize that John Wayne started appearing in films (in bit parts) in 1927, but did not get to be a big star until his role in Stagecoach (1939).

Little Orphant Annie (1918) (and, yes, it is “Orphant” not “Orphan”) has been available for some time but (as the program points out) never in a GOOD copy. This restoration was eminently viewable, although for me the best part of the movie was an impressively trained cat who seemed able to tolerate everything. As you cat owners know, “toleration” isn’t usually high on a cat’s list of attributes. This one would happily be carried in a scarf (with tail calmly waving) and happily walk up to the reclined star (Colleen Moore) and curl up beside her.

The Sea God (1930) is a typical “tough Americans put one over on primitive islanders” saga and, again, eminently forgettable (despite Fay Wray’s best efforts), but it did have Eugene Pallette in a supporting part. No movie is a complete loss if it has Eugene Pallette in the cast. Once again, he walks away with the best lines in the movie, all delivered with his usual gravel-voiced tones.

The Countess of Monte Cristo (1934) is an amusing comedy with quite a couple chuckles and some bizarre dialogue (“I’m not dangerous, I’m debonair!”). It almost made my list of movies I want on DVD--but I’d rather have the original, which is a 1932 German film called Die Gräfin von Monte-Christo starring Brigitte Helm (probably best known as Maria & the Robot in Metropolis).

And then there were the morally questionable “pre-Code” films: Disorderly Conduct (1932), starring Spencer Tracy as an honest cop who crosses a racketeer who (rather than using violence) uses influence to bust him down a rank. Tracy decides to go crooked and accepts bribes from a more violently inclined racketeer. Tracy’s captain learns Tracy is crooked, and tells him he will be thrown off the force...after he leads a raid against the violent racketeer. Later, thinking himself betrayed, the violent racketeer tries to gun down Tracy and accidentally kills Tracy’s nephew. Tracy, seeking revenge, goes and guns down the violent racketeer and two of his henchmen. Wounded in the battle, he gets back to the police station and returns a bribe he got from the non-violent racketeer. Result? His captain is impressed by his honesty in returning the bribe and reinstates Tracy back to the rank he had at the start of the film. And the three guys he murdered? Ehhhhh, why let that get in the way of a happy ending? What is the moral there? Kill people to get your job back?

Then there was White Lies (1934). A newspaper publisher finds a man who embezzled $30,000, but had returned $20,000 of it and was working on the rest. He publishes the story, the guy gets arrested, convicted and then escapes (after wounding a police man). The embezzler then finds the publisher’s daughter, knocks her unconscious and then murders the guy she is with and places the gun in her hand. She goes to trial, where the publisher sobs that it is all his fault because none of this would have happened if he had not published the first story despite the fact that the embezzler was trying to make good the loss. An honest police detective (in love with publisher’s daughter, natch) captures the embezzler and brings him to the trial while the judge is summing up the case for the jury. Happy ending, including...the publisher swearing that he will hire lawyers to defend the embezzler and “when he gets out of prison” giving him a job. Ummmmmmmmm, he did murder an unarmed guy in cold blood. What makes anybody think he will ever get out of prison????

Anyway, a good time was had. Next year’s featured star will be Ronald Colman! I’m already looking forward to it!

There were also dealers in hard-to-find movies on DVD, and I probably bought too many. But, really, where else am I likely to find Myrna Loy in a 1959 Kinescope of a TV production of Meet Me in St. Louis?

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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RooK

1 of 6
# 1852

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Just watched Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom with my 8-year-old. The swashbuckling adventurer with a knack for getting into trouble enjoyed the second Indiana Jones movie.
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Twilight

Puddleglum's sister
# 2832

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quote:
Originally posted by Cathscats:
I saw Dunkirk last week with my teenage son. I expected to have to shut my eyes a lot, but didn't. I didn't find it totally gripping, but it was certainly watchable. Actually, I think the teenage son was the best audience for it. He was entirely enthralled and full of reflective questions later.


We saw Dunkirk, today based on what everyone here has said. It was a good pick for the three of us. As with Cathscat, our son liked it best giving it a 10, husband a 9, and me an 8 which is high for me for anything not Howards End-ish.

I long to see Maudie, but it's not showing in a theatre near me; it not being animated, nor having any guns.

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Stetson
Shipmate
# 9597

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Wadd: The Life And Times Of John C. Holmes

1998 documentary about the rather squalid life of the American adult-film actor. I had read, years ago, Mike Sager's landmark article about Holmes in Rolling Stone, so knew the basic outline of his story, and thus the film didn't contain many fresh revelations, but I'm a sucker for 1970s nostalgia, so this worked for me.

One interesting thing about it, cinematically, is the way it uses footage from Holmes' movies to represent the actual events of his life, eg. when the real John Holmes is driving through the American southwest on the run from the law, film footage is shown of his character driving through what looks like a desert area.

No hardcore footage, but enough nudity to render it NSFW. Available on You Tube(as of two days ago, anyway).

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I have the power...Lucifer is lord!

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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I just watched Batman vs. Superman-Dawn of Justice for the second time today. I first watched it Saturday (the PG shortened version), and I had no clue what they were going on about. It seemed disjointed and didn't make a lot of sense. So, today, I watched the R rated version. That's the one with all the violence.

It did make more sense to me the second time through. Some of the scenes that were cut in the milder version really had explanations of some of the more confusing parts of the story.

Anyway, once I kind of followed what was going on, it was a mostly good story. There was one part where it seemed Batman had gone home and changed, because his mask was busted up during one scene, then was all nice and new looking in the next. I guess he had to go home to get the Bat Plane. Oh. The Bat Plane and Batmobile both sound like pod racers.

I like Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill playing our heroes, even though I'm not normally an Affleck fan. However, my favorite is Gal Godot! She is Wonder Woman, for real!

I'm glad I watched the movie a second time, and will probably watch a third time with the subtitles turned on. These youngsters mumble too much! [Big Grin]

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
# 5647

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quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
I long to see Maudie, but it's not showing in a theatre near me; it not being animated, nor having any guns.

Oh, Maudie is lovely, I hope you do get to see it somehow. I know what you mean about the lack of animation or guns ... we also live in the sort of place where smaller, artier movies either don't come at all, or are here so briefly that by the time you've made plans to get out of the house, the movie is gone. But Maudie had a good long run here because it was filmed here and lots of local people were involved (even though it's set in Nova Scotia, it was filmed in Newfoundland because [obscure thing about the Nova Scotia film industry that I don't understand but that lots of NS arts people are mad about but worked out to our benefit here in Nfld in this case]).

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

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Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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I saw Logan the other night - in which elderly Professor X and Wolverine go on a road trip with a young girl mutant. As soon as it finished, I spent the rest of the evening trying to re-write it in my head to give a lower body count! There were some characters who you just knew were doomed as soon as they met Logan.

And now I've been told that Peter Capaldi appeared in The Lair of the White Worm, which I remember only for Stratford Johns chewing the scenery and some young chap dashing around the ruins attempting to play bagpipes to calm the monster (I think). The young chap may have been Hugh Grant. So I've sent off for a DVD, which has arrived labelled in German - so this evening's viewing should be hilarious!

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jedijudy

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My Daddy-O and I went to an actual theater to watch a movie! Dad hadn't been to a theater since 2012, so this was a rare event for him.

We saw Spider-Man: Homecoming, which was a real romp! This is my favorite Spiderman. Tom Holland is a cutie patootie and was believable as a teen and all that entails, plus having super powers and trying to prove himself.

The special effects were so much fun! My dad was amazed at the realism.

The story is about a good kid trying to do the right things with varying successes.

**spoiler!**

What will he do when he finds out the father of the girl he has a huge crush on is a Very Bad Guy???

When we left the theater, my dad laughed and said, "Well, it's no Gone with the Wind is it?" But it was fun!

[ETA " ]

[ 31. August 2017, 12:22: Message edited by: jedijudy ]

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Stetson
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quote:
Originally posted by Eigon:

And now I've been told that Peter Capaldi appeared in The Lair of the White Worm, which I remember only for Stratford Johns chewing the scenery and some young chap dashing around the ruins attempting to play bagpipes to calm the monster (I think). The young chap may have been Hugh Grant. So I've sent off for a DVD, which has arrived labelled in German - so this evening's viewing should be hilarious!

Yes, it was Hugh Grant.

Though what I remember best about the movie is the patented Ken Russell hallucination sequences, like eg. a nun suddenly appearing on the screen and spitting blood.

Seriously, no one did religious horror like Ken Russell. Made The Exorcist look like Uncle Arthur's Bedtime Stories.

Possibly NSFW

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leo
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# 1458

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Holding the Man - true love story from Australia about the devastating impact of AIDS.

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RooK

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Seven Samurai - a not-true story from classical Nippon about a specific number of a warrior class.
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Eigon
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# 4917

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Stetson - the character in Lair of the White Worm (or Der Biss Der Schlange Frau*, in this case) dashing around in a kilt with bagpipes was indeed Peter Capaldi! He looked so cute with his curls and round glasses! I do have questions, though - this may have been covered in the script, if I'd been watching in English, but where on earth did he get that mongoose from? And was it really up his kilt all that time?
Hugh Grant was the aristocratic RAF officer - Stratford Johns was his butler.

*The Kiss of the Snake Woman

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
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georgiaboy
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# 11294

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quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:

"Well, it's no Gone with the Wind is it?"

[ETA " ]

Deserves a place in Quotes File!

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Stetson
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quote:
Originally posted by Eigon:
Stetson - the character in Lair of the White Worm (or Der Biss Der Schlange Frau*, in this case) dashing around in a kilt with bagpipes was indeed Peter Capaldi! He looked so cute with his curls and round glasses! I do have questions, though - this may have been covered in the script, if I'd been watching in English, but where on earth did he get that mongoose from? And was it really up his kilt all that time?
Hugh Grant was the aristocratic RAF officer - Stratford Johns was his butler.

*The Kiss of the Snake Woman

Sorry, Eigon, I was right about Grant's presence in the cast, but wrong about which character he played. Actually, I can't remember much about who did what in that film, it's probably been about twenty years since I saw it.
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Stetson
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Saw The Beguiled, set in a Virginia girls school during the Civil War. You could probably say it qualifies as a Female Lord Of The Flies.

I was a little disappointed to find out it was a remake of an earlier film, since I usually don't see the necessity of doing that, unless it's really different from the original. This one may be, for all I know, though I'd doubt it, since there's really only so many ways a story like that can be told.

Taken on its own terms, it's entertaining enough, with a slightly leering focus on feminine miscreancy. Probably not as profound as some might want to make it out to be.

[ 09. September 2017, 18:19: Message edited by: Stetson ]

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louis crandall
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quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
Saw The Beguiled, set in a Virginia girls school during the Civil War. You could probably say it qualifies as a Female Lord Of The Flies.

I was a little disappointed to find out it was a remake of an earlier film, since I usually don't see the necessity of doing that, unless it's really different from the original. This one may be, for all I know, though I'd doubt it, since there's really only so many ways a story like that can be told.

Taken on its own terms, it's entertaining enough, with a slightly leering focus on feminine miscreancy. Probably not as profound as some might want to make it out to be.

The original version of The Beguiled came out in 1971 and starred a certain Clint Eastwood and was directed by his friend Don Siegel.
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Stetson
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Yep, Don Siegel of Body Snatchers and Dirty Harry fame. The latter being one of the more subtle and understated of the vigilante genre.

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I have the power...Lucifer is lord!

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Stetson
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WEEKEND ROUNDUP...

Saw American Made on Saturday. Sort of a political-procedural thriller, along the lines of Charlie Wllson's War or American Hustle(ie. political procedural), but with more action, violence and suspense. Entertaining enough, and heavy on the 80s trappings for all you nostalgia buffs. I actually remember watching Ronald Reagan's anti-Sandinista speech where he talks about the photograph that plays such a major role in the plot.

Directed by Doug Liman, son of Arthur Liman, who Iran-Contra buffs will recall as the Senate's chief counsel during the hearings. (This somewhat coincides with the plot.)

And on Sunday, I watched Wind River, about a white wildlife-control officer and a white FBI agent investigating a mysterious death on an Indian Reservation in Wyoming. It starts off promising enough, with expertly crafted atmosphere and cultural tension, but the resolution to the mystery seemed like kind of a letdown. Granted, I'm pretty tired off the too-clever-by-half plot twists that blight so many modern thrillers, but this one erred in the other direction: You can kind of guess, if not outright predict, that the crime in question was something like what it turns out to be.

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Tukai
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# 12960

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Jedda. The first Australian film to be made in colour, by Claude Chauvel way back in 1955. It is now available in a beautifully remastered digital version, with the sunlit colours of the Northern Territory and no flicker.

It's the story of Jedda, an aboriginal girl brought up by the owner-managers of an outback cattle station, which in those days employed lots of aboriginal workers at pittance wages. Jedda falls for a visiting aboriginal worker called Marbuk, who runs away with her - or depending on your viewpoint, abducts her.

The story and cinematography weren't bad either, including the now vanished way of life on the old cattle stations, the various spectacular NT locations (though often not those implied by the story), and the aboriginal bushcraft and dancing. I even picked that the scenery in wide view in the last few scenes looked more like the Great Dividing Range than anywhere I remember in the Territory. (Turns out that the original "on location" last reel was lost in a fire, so they had to reshoot it elsewhere.)

Very remarkable for a film made in 1955 was the amount of dialogue that was only in aboriginal language with no subtitles. Presumably part of the point was that Jedda didn't understand what Marbuk was saying and vice versa.

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A government that panders to the worst instincts of its people degrades the whole country for years to come.

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Eutychus
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Blade Runner fan reporting back here from Blade Runner 2049. You won't be disappointed if you enjoyed the first one. Avoid spoilers at all costs.

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Stetson
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Holiday(Korean thanksgiving) update.

Damsels In Distress.

I'll start off by citing Kelly Alves' earlier characterization of Greta Gerwig as "an adorable schlemiel", a persona of full and delightful display in this Whit Stilman number from a few years back. I'm tempted to say she makes the film, but Stilman's witty dialogue certainly doesn't hurt either. The story falls back on his normal set-up of socially awkward privileged-class young people, engaged in the pursuit of love and fulfillment. The characters and situations come off as funny, even when they aren't actually saying or doing anything amusing.

My favorite exchange...

POSSIBLE SPOILER

The main character, an earnest Ivy Leaguish do-gooder portrayed by Gerwig, is listening to a left-wing campus firebrand explain why fraternities need to be shut down, a proposal that the Gerwig character thinks will somehow lead to the frat boys being left homeless.

GERWIG: And you call yourself a Christian!

FIREBRAND: Umm, no I don't.

[Okay, it probably works better in the film itself]

And back in Canada for a few days, I watched The Glass Castle, about a highly dysfunctional yet still loving family who live as squatters in a succession of abandoned homes and endure the mercurial tempermant and occassional violence of their father. Pretty good, especially with Woody Harrelson's performance as the unbalanced visionary who heads the clan, but probably doesn't transcend much above your typical messed-up family memoir flick(think of a darker, more rustic version of Slums Of Beverly Hills). Recommended, in any case.

On the plane back to Korea, I watched Wakefield, about a middle-class businessman who hides out in the attic of his garage and spies on his family for a few months(despite the fact that police are called and his disappearance is reported on the news, no one thinks to do a search of the property, but I guess we're supposed to suspend disbelief).

While the script doesn't explicitly frame the main characters actions as a mid-life crisis, that's pretty much what it ends up being, and we're more or less in American Beauty territory, thematicallly speaking, though minus the sex and drugs. Worth seeing for Bryan Cranston alone, but probably not gonna blow you away with strikingly original insights into suburban angst.

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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re spoilers in trailer for upcoming "Star Wars: The Last Jedi":

IMPORTANT: the trailer, evidently out now/soon, is known to have a major spoiler. Even someone from the film said so. I don't know what it is, and I haven't seen the trailer.

But I'm already having to avoid articles about the *trailer*, let alone the movie. NOT a happy camper.

Now I'll have to avoid the trailer, too. [Frown]

Anyway, fair warning to all who don't want spoilers.

And to anyone who knows: PLEASE don't even think of posting the slightest whiff of a hint.

Thx.

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--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
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Sipech
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# 16870

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Might it be worth having a new, separate thread for the new Star Wars film? I recall we did something like that for The Force Awakens.

Albeit, I also recall that in spite of it clearly being marked as a spoiler thread that contained spoilers, so that those not wanting anything to read anything that could possibly be construed as a spoiler should avoid reading the thread, someone still complained about it containing spoilers. [Roll Eyes]

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jedijudy

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Daughter-Unit and I were discussing the two trailers yesterday. I'm not going to say what was in the trailer, and D-U and I didn't say it out loud, but we were both not happy. She, in her wisdom, is thinking that Disney does not want to make the huge number of SW fans hate them.

BTW, we have our tickets for the movie already!

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Jane R
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It's the title (of the new Star Wars film) that annoys me. There are so many 'last' Jedis.

Obi-Wan Kenobi? But then it turned out Luke was a Jedi as well. And he sent Luke to learn Jedi-ing from Yoda, so even when we thought he was the last Jedi he wasn't.

Then Yoda and Obi-Wan were both dead, so does that mean Luke was the last Jedi? Well, not exactly because it turns out Leia is his twin sister, although she doesn't go to knight school, presumably because everyone wants her to be a general instead.

Fast forward to the new films and we have Rey. Is she the last Jedi? Maybe not, because Luke is still alive.

What we have here is a series of Penultimate Jedis. I admit it doesn't make such a catchy title.

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Stetson
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I don't see what was so brilliantly witty about Mandy Rice-Davies saying "Well, he would, wouldn't he?" at the Profumo trial.

The lawyer had basically asked her opinion about Astor's denial that he had an affair with her, and she replied with what I would have assumed is a pretty logical counterpoint, ie. obviously Astor would have an interest in denying he commited adultery.

I guess it's maybe one of those "different time, different place" sorta things? In the early 60s, it was still somewhat shocking that an 18 year old womman would so casually dismiss the claims of a respected aristocrat? Still find it hard to believe that it would be THAT much of an eyebrow raiser, especially considering that she had already said they had an affair.

[ 12. October 2017, 16:24: Message edited by: Stetson ]

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Stetson
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^ Umm, wrong thread. Really sorry about that. Promise to start using the preview button more consistently(not that it would likely make much difference if I don't even know what thread I'm in).

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I have the power...Lucifer is lord!

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lilBuddha
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# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
It's the title (of the new Star Wars film) that annoys me. There are so many 'last' Jedis.

Obi-Wan Kenobi? But then it turned out Luke was a Jedi as well. And he sent Luke to learn Jedi-ing from Yoda, so even when we thought he was the last Jedi he wasn't.

Then Yoda and Obi-Wan were both dead, so does that mean Luke was the last Jedi? Well, not exactly because it turns out Leia is his twin sister, although she doesn't go to knight school, presumably because everyone wants her to be a general instead.

Fast forward to the new films and we have Rey. Is she the last Jedi? Maybe not, because Luke is still alive.

What we have here is a series of Penultimate Jedis. I admit it doesn't make such a catchy title.

Luke wasn't a Jedi until he was trained by Yoda, Leia was never a Jedi. One might presume Rey will become a Jedi, but until The Last Jedi airs, we do not know.
They are all Force sensitives, but that does not equal Jedi.

[ 12. October 2017, 22:51: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]

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So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

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Prester John
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# 5502

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quote:
Originally posted by Eutychus:
Blade Runner fan reporting back here from Blade Runner 2049. You won't be disappointed if you enjoyed the first one. Avoid spoilers at all costs.

Just saw it and throughly enjoyed it, although I felt some of the nudity was gratuitous. One thing that struck me though was that the original did a much better job of capturing the grittiness of urban living, despite the fact it was created three decades ago.
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