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Source: (consider it) Thread: Movie thread
Nicolemr
Shipmate
# 28

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Just saw Spiderman: Homecoming. The best word I can think of to describe it is "cute". I liked it, it wasn't great, but it was fun and cute.

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On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

Posts: 11578 | From: New York City "The City Carries On" | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kaplan Corday
Shipmate
# 16119

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Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

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simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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Dunkirk was the first film I have seen at the Cinema since running screaming from the theatre after the recent Star Wars reboot. I felt it was an excellent film, giving great encouragement to men with bald spots. Mark Rylance FTUW

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The opinions expressed above are transitory emotional responses and do not necessarily reflect the considered views of the author.

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churchgeek

Have candles, will pray
# 5557

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Has anyone seen "Detroit"? I'm planning to go tomorrow night. I'm curious what anyone not from Detroit might think of it.

(I do wish they'd given it a better title, though.)

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I reserve the right to change my mind.

My article on the Virgin of Vladimir

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Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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I happened to hear one of the Proms season, which started with Korngold's wonderful score for The Sea Hawk, so I curled up for a nostalgic re-watch. I was pleasantly surprised to see it pass the Bechdel Test (Queen Elizabeth talks to Donna Maria, and Donna Maria talks to her maid Miss Latham, and not always about Captain Thorpe), and Donna Maria (Brenda Marshall doing her best Olivia de Havilland impression) actively trying to warn Captain Thorpe that his secret plan has been discovered, and helping him get the secret dispatches to the Queen at the climax.
I also enjoyed the way that the climactic sword fight was cut so that it looked as if Henry Daniell had a clue about what he was doing!

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

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lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

No brown people...

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

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Stercus Tauri
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# 16668

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I didn't see Dunkirk yesterday. After half an hour of increasingly loud and violent commercials and trailers, plus choking on the dreadful popcorn fog, I left. My dear wife said it was good, but I thoroughly enjoyed the time outside on a beautifully cool summer evening, reading an excellent book.

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

Posts: 819 | From: On the traditional lands of the Six Nations. | Registered: Sep 2011  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

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That's why, when we lived elsewhere, we tended to wait for films to come to the local Film Theatre rather than going to see them at the Multiplex. It was a far more agreeable experience (and, if you think I'm saying that "a better class of viewer went to the film theatre", you're probably right!)
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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Over the last few days I have re-watched The Lord of the Rings for about the 173rd time - I must confess that my comments get a tad more unrepeatable every time but I still enjoy it.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Kaplan Corday
Shipmate
# 16119

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quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

No brown people...
Yes, they were certainly part of the British component, though a very small proportion.

https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-08-02/there-were-indian-troops-dunkirk-too

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Twilight

Puddleglum's sister
# 2832

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quote:
all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.


Now I'm thinking I may be able to go see it after all.

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
quote:
all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.
Now I'm thinking I may be able to go see it after all.
If you're like me in this regard, and I suspect you are, you can see this movie. I pass by pretty much any film with an R for violence, but this is PG-rated. The deaths aren't depicted realistically.
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Cathscats
Shipmate
# 17827

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I saw Dunkirk last week with my teenage son. I expected to have to shut my eyes a lot, but didn't. I didn't find it totally gripping, but it was certainly watchable. Actually, I think the teenage son was the best audience for it. He was entirely enthralled and full of reflective questions later.

I did fear that the end was going to be a bit too much "Land of Hope and Glory" -ish but they reigned it in just in time.

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"...damp hands and theological doubts - the two always seem to go together..." (O. Douglas, "The Setons")

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lilBuddha
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# 14333

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Christopher Nolan stripped most of the carnage of the real Dunkirk in order to tell stories. The result is a war film for a broader audience.
Like most films of this nature, don't look to it as an history, but history adjacent.
A major negative for me was the score. Whilst Hans Zimmer didn't drive the viewers into shrieking madness as he did in Intersteller, the Sheppard tone is overused. Though this might be under Nolan's direction.

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So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16330 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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quote:
Originally posted by Bene Gesserit:
quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
Just watched Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, the unlikely tale of a municipality connected to a large number of celestial bodies.

We're still hmm-ing and ha-ing about how much or whether we want to see that one. What did you think of it?
Because it's still in theaters . . .
It's not just another Besson film. It's also another French 1970's sci-fi comic book. Which, granted, have influenced . . . well, lots of people . . . but keep in mind: this is a genre where Barbarella was a genuine epoch-making work.

High points of French 1970's Sci-Fi-Comic Books: gorgeous scenery. Sometimes strange, mind-bending themes. Great influence on everything from Star Wars to Nausicaa. Did we mention the scenery? It's gorgeous.

Low points: anything resembling a coherent plot. Depth of characters.

The best F70SFCB's, like Mobeus, don't even try to bother with dialogue or coherent plots. Sometimes, they just embrace the surrealism and run with it. They don't have plot holes or lazy, pastiche charactarizations; no, they're absurdist, trope-subverting fantasies!

If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great. There are a few shots that are lifted straight from Mobeus and his contemporaries (like the helmets in the desert scenes—could swear I've seen those in Airtight Garage), a few others that look like they were meant for dual-page spreads in a full-color album. Gorgeous, imaginative, and sometimes absurd.

If you actually want something that looks like someone thought about the screenplay beyond setting up a world to explore . . . sorry. Not in this genre.

As for Detroit . . . it strikes me as a Socially Conscious Movie. Like, not one with a social conscience. More one that lets you feel Outraged about what Other People Have Done while watching Other People get beat up, shot, and stripped naked. A bit of an overt awards bid cloaked in shock and violence. Which is not to say shocking and violent events don't or didn't happen—but that they can be handled in a way that doesn't exploit them for our lurid viewing pleasure. I don't know which side of the line Detroit winds up on, but it's pretty close either way.

[ 10. August 2017, 22:36: Message edited by: Ariston ]

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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RooK

Rocky Mountain SLAYER
# 1852

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Snuck out to see Atomic Blonde, the retro tale of an intensely powerful female with light-coloured hair.
Posts: 15054 | From: Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
RooK

Rocky Mountain SLAYER
# 1852

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:
If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great.

Your description encapsulates the mind space well. If you love looking for visual detail and are amused by metaphorical puns, this movie delivers the genre goods. Otherwise, VATCOATP is going to seem like a mishmash with no compelling point.

On the topic of Atomic Blonde - holy shit the soundtrack. People who remember the 80's will either love it, or die miserable and lonely for lack of having a soul. And the fight scenes are considerably more effective than most action movies; a testament to Theron's raw talent and Leitch's compelling inclusion of entropy.

Posts: 15054 | From: Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:
If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great.

Your description encapsulates the mind space well. If you love looking for visual detail and are amused by metaphorical puns, this movie delivers the genre goods. Otherwise, VATCOATP is going to seem like a mishmash with no compelling point.

On the topic of Atomic Blonde - holy shit the soundtrack. People who remember the 80's will either love it, or die miserable and lonely for lack of having a soul. And the fight scenes are considerably more effective than most action movies; a testament to Theron's raw talent and Leitch's compelling inclusion of entropy.

For shame. Andy Kaufman is going to haunt you.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16330 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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In a fit of [more than usual] insanity I decided to watch the first of the Harry Potter movies last night - I remembered it was bad but had forgotten how bad it was! The disc had a fault so I only saw up to the end of the troll scene and then gave up. John Hurt, Alan Rickman and Maggie Smith were the only redeeming features.

Quoth the raven "Nevermore!"

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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My kids (esp the younger, just 10) love them. I've seen some much, much, much poorer kids' films. (Worst so far? Probably an excrescence called 'Home'). I'm going to miss kids films as they both get older.

We just watched the Lego Batman Movie. Which is OK, but I don't think it would stand 2 viewings as the Lego Movie did.

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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quote:
Alan Rickman
(Oh - and the films have been useful in that when the neighbours' kids throw shit into my garden - mostly broken toys and dismembered remains of their grandmother's plastic bushes (don't ask) - and I ask them to desist, my kids say that 'Dad has his Snape-voice on again'...)

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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I have returned from the annual Capitolfest movie festival, this year honoring Fay Wray. This year, the feature films were made between 1918 (Little Orphant Annie) and 1934 (The Countess of Monte Cristo and White Lies). There may have been shorts from later years.

As a surprise this year, it was attended by Fay Wray’s daughter, Victoria Riskin. Probably not a coincidence, but she has a memoir about her mother scheduled to be published later this year. Still, her presence highlights just how hard the festival works to find rare movies to show: Ms. Riskin admitted that a couple of the films starring her mother she had never seen (including the previously mentioned The Countess of Monte Cristo)!

Normally I note what films from the festival I’d like to have on DVD. Unfortunately, this year the only one that would go on the list happens to be one that I already own: The Four Feathers (1929). But that doesn’t mean that there was nothing of interest.

For example, there was one called Cheer Up and Smile (1930), which was almost instantly forgettable...except for the fact that it had John Wayne in an uncredited bit part. I found it a bit shocking to realize that John Wayne started appearing in films (in bit parts) in 1927, but did not get to be a big star until his role in Stagecoach (1939).

Little Orphant Annie (1918) (and, yes, it is “Orphant” not “Orphan”) has been available for some time but (as the program points out) never in a GOOD copy. This restoration was eminently viewable, although for me the best part of the movie was an impressively trained cat who seemed able to tolerate everything. As you cat owners know, “toleration” isn’t usually high on a cat’s list of attributes. This one would happily be carried in a scarf (with tail calmly waving) and happily walk up to the reclined star (Colleen Moore) and curl up beside her.

The Sea God (1930) is a typical “tough Americans put one over on primitive islanders” saga and, again, eminently forgettable (despite Fay Wray’s best efforts), but it did have Eugene Pallette in a supporting part. No movie is a complete loss if it has Eugene Pallette in the cast. Once again, he walks away with the best lines in the movie, all delivered with his usual gravel-voiced tones.

The Countess of Monte Cristo (1934) is an amusing comedy with quite a couple chuckles and some bizarre dialogue (“I’m not dangerous, I’m debonair!”). It almost made my list of movies I want on DVD--but I’d rather have the original, which is a 1932 German film called Die Gräfin von Monte-Christo starring Brigitte Helm (probably best known as Maria & the Robot in Metropolis).

And then there were the morally questionable “pre-Code” films: Disorderly Conduct (1932), starring Spencer Tracy as an honest cop who crosses a racketeer who (rather than using violence) uses influence to bust him down a rank. Tracy decides to go crooked and accepts bribes from a more violently inclined racketeer. Tracy’s captain learns Tracy is crooked, and tells him he will be thrown off the force...after he leads a raid against the violent racketeer. Later, thinking himself betrayed, the violent racketeer tries to gun down Tracy and accidentally kills Tracy’s nephew. Tracy, seeking revenge, goes and guns down the violent racketeer and two of his henchmen. Wounded in the battle, he gets back to the police station and returns a bribe he got from the non-violent racketeer. Result? His captain is impressed by his honesty in returning the bribe and reinstates Tracy back to the rank he had at the start of the film. And the three guys he murdered? Ehhhhh, why let that get in the way of a happy ending? What is the moral there? Kill people to get your job back?

Then there was White Lies (1934). A newspaper publisher finds a man who embezzled $30,000, but had returned $20,000 of it and was working on the rest. He publishes the story, the guy gets arrested, convicted and then escapes (after wounding a police man). The embezzler then finds the publisher’s daughter, knocks her unconscious and then murders the guy she is with and places the gun in her hand. She goes to trial, where the publisher sobs that it is all his fault because none of this would have happened if he had not published the first story despite the fact that the embezzler was trying to make good the loss. An honest police detective (in love with publisher’s daughter, natch) captures the embezzler and brings him to the trial while the judge is summing up the case for the jury. Happy ending, including...the publisher swearing that he will hire lawyers to defend the embezzler and “when he gets out of prison” giving him a job. Ummmmmmmmm, he did murder an unarmed guy in cold blood. What makes anybody think he will ever get out of prison????

Anyway, a good time was had. Next year’s featured star will be Ronald Colman! I’m already looking forward to it!

There were also dealers in hard-to-find movies on DVD, and I probably bought too many. But, really, where else am I likely to find Myrna Loy in a 1959 Kinescope of a TV production of Meet Me in St. Louis?

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

Posts: 2568 | From: Delaware, USA | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged



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