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Source: (consider it) Thread: On the Back Burner: Recipes 2017
Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
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Here's a brand-new recipe thread for a brand-new year. The old one has been moved to Limbo in case anyone still wants to try any recipes posted last year.

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Avey
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Here is a recipe for a "Home-Style" lamb and potato Punjabi curry given to me by a friend years ago. I make this often in winter and it is delicious.

7 tablespoons vegetable oil
One large onion finely chopped
2 finely chopped green chillies
5 cloves of garlic finely chopped
500 grams boneless cubed lamb
Large tin chopped tomatoes
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground coriander
Half a teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon chilli powder (or to taste, I add a bit more)
2 teaspoons salt
3 or 4 large potatoes peeled and cut into large chunks.
1 and a half pints water

Heat oil over a high heat and when hot add onions and green chillies, stir fry until onions begin to brown on the edges.

Add garlic and all the ground spices and the salt stir until you can smell the spices roasting.

Add lamb stir well until coated with the spice mixture then add the tomatoes, Cook on high heat until sauce thickens and the oil separates.

Add water and potatoes, bring to boil then cover and cook on a low heat, leaving lid on pot ajar, for an hour or until meat is tender and the sauce thick.

Serves 4 and freezes really well.

I usually serve this with rice and an onion salad.

[ 09. January 2017, 15:13: Message edited by: Avey ]

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Lyda*Rose

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I have found that I have a problem with milk, although it isn't lactose intolerance. Also I'm planning on lowering my carbs and milk is pretty carbie. Has anyone had experience in using plant based milk substitutes like rice, almond, or soy milk in cooking? Would unsweetened versions act like real milk in soups or white sauces and gravy? Thanks!

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Brenda Clough
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Here is a recipe for spiced nuts. These are highly addictive and perennially popular at parties.

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Avey
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That looks delicious must try.
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Penny S
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This is my attempt on a recipe from a local charity cafe. Equal parts of whipped cream and a soured dairy product - could be yoghurt, but last time I used smatana. A quantity of halved seedless grapes. Then soft brown sugar sprinkled on and folded roughly in to form streaks.
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Curious Kitten
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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Has anyone had experience in using plant based milk substitutes like rice, almond, or soy milk in cooking? Would unsweetened versions act like real milk in soups or white sauces and gravy? Thanks!

I use unsweetened soya milk as a dairy replacement. It takes a bit more effort to get a lump free white sauce with soya milk than with normal milk and there is according to other people a distinct taste to anything made with soya milk. It's also messier when used in tea or coffee. You can always tell which mug is mine from the residue at the bottom.

Rice milk has a watery taste and I have never managed to cook with it and not have it split. It also doesn't add anything dish.

Most people I know swear by almond and cashew nut milk as their preferred substitutes and would use cashew for white sauces as it's a creamer texture.

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Jengie jon

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My solution to that is to blend silken tofu with soya milk with flavourings until I get the right constituency then heat.

Avocado with it makes a really rich creamy sauce.

Jengie

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Moo

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I haven't tried it yet, but I was thinking of using coconut milk as a substitute. Has anyone had any experience with this?

Moo

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Curiosity killed ...

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I have used soya milk successfully in pancakes and Yorkshire puddings, but they are nicer with some flavouring. The other trick is using soya cream to add creamy textures to sauces. The problem is I am usually substituting gluten free flours too, but buckwheat pancakes work.

I have also made rice pudding successfully with coconut milk. That one I like with dried fruit, such as apricots, as sweetener and cardamom pods, but the same person who can't eat wheat or dairy can't eat cardamom seeds either.

We can get hold of a butter substitute based on coconut oil that works well, avoids whey powder and doesn't have a strong taste.

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Gee D
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We use soy milk for virtually everything to minimise cholesterol intake. Some friends use coconut substitutes, as she is lactose intolerant and he says that they may as well use the same. The only time dairy milk is used is in making bread when the mix will be put into the machine well before the dough needs be ready to be baked. Then we use milk powder, too great a risk of liquid milk either soy or cow going sour beforehand.

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Gee D
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We use soy milk for virtually everything to minimise cholesterol intake. Some friends use coconut substitutes, as she is lactose intolerant and he says that they may as well use the same. The only time dairy milk is used is in making bread when the mix will be put into the machine well before the dough needs be ready to be baked. Then we use milk powder, too great a risk of liquid milk either soy or cow going sour beforehand.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Lyda*Rose

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Thanks for the replies. Sorry I didn't get back here sooner. I think I was particularly interested in making sauces and I'm pleased to hear about the nut milks. I think I'll head for Trader Joe's and get some unsweetened almond milk to try chicken a la king. And coconut milk sounds like a winner for desserts.

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Penny S
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I need some ideas for savoury dishes for someone whose teeth aren't up to much. She managed Christmas dinner with shredded and cut up turkey, and the sausage stuffing, though not the bacon round the chipolata. The potatoes, parsnips and sprouts were OK. I have served shepherds' pie with added lentils and mushrooms (though they bothered her), and the meat filling with added tomato and mascarpone sauce the following week. This week was fish pie with haddock, which went well. She had problems with frozen peas, preferring tinned ones, as they mash down, and the fresh carrot batons didn't either.
I suspect Indian or Chinese might not be appropriate. I know she eats tinned spaghetti on toast, but that doesn't really count!

I can manage dessert recipes OK.

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Piglet
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Because I'm actually part piglet and part soup-dragon [Big Grin] I'd advocate any kind of soup that takes your (or her) fancy, especially at this time of year when you want something warm and comforting. And nearly every kind of soup can be pureed without coming to much harm.

If you add some nice soft bread or rolls, it would make a very decent (and quite filling) lunch or supper.

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Penny S
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It seems that quiche type things are OK, which extends the repertoire a bit! (She wanted one bought after shop-shut time!) I don't think puree is quite needed yet. Though possibly the veggies can go that route. (I might try cauliflower rice.)

And I can see problems involving soup and my Dad's rugs under the table.

I used to have a story book from which I read to classes, and there was a Chinese story involving a creature called a Nunguama, which threatened to eat an old widow woman, and the shocking part of this was that Nunguamas were known to be very messy eaters. And it has come to mind, of late.

[ 17. January 2017, 21:34: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Welease Woderwick

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How about a Risotto?

It's tasty and the varieties are endless.

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MaryLouise
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Or pasta with ragu and grated Parmesan, Penny S? You could up the stewed fruit for roughage.

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la vie en rouge
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This sounds like my Grandad (short of teeth and likes traditional British food).

He enjoys casseroles where the meat is tender and falling apart. They go well with mashed potato (tasty, easy to eat and soaks up juices from said casserole). On the same lines, shepherd’s/cottage pie has mash and everything else chopped up small. He also finds fish not very hard to chew.

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Penny S
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Sounds a bit like where I was going anyway. This weekend is probably going to be meaty sauce (whether ragu or casserole or mince (though I think I won't use the veal)) under a potato gratin. Tinned veggies. Rhubarb something or other to follow. Probably layered with custard and breadcrumb crumble. (I have a lot of breadcrumbs.)

[ 18. January 2017, 13:18: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Gee D
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Use short pasta - may horrify the purists, but perhaps easier for her to manage.

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Penny S
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Oh, yes, shells and stuff.

Today, unexpected visit (possibly). Mince based. But, since I have some leftover frozen chestnut and sausage stuffing, which she liked, it will be some sort of poultry mince. (I have a Spong mincer, if the supermarket has no ready minced stuff.) Can't be beef because it needs to be slow, and there isn't enough time. The liquid will be Campbell's condensed soup. Chicken or mushroom - haven't decided. (I have long enjoyed Peg Bracken's 'I Hate to Cook' style of recipe.)

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Jack the Lass

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Quick freezing question:

I took some soft fruit out of the freezer yesterday to make a crumble, but it turns out I defrosted rather more than I meant to. Which isn't a problem, I've now got two crumbles waiting to be cooked. However, we are probably only going to want to eat one right now, so I would like to freeze the other one. My question is, should I cook them both and freeze one after it is cooked, or should I just cook the one I want to eat today, and freeze the other one uncooked and just defrost and cook when I'm ready for it?

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Brenda Clough
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I would freeze it uncooked. The baking would crisp it up when next you want to eat it. Baking it now and then freezing and reheating won't get you crispness.

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Penny S
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I am not going to have a Spong mincer much longer. It was far too messy and the blades didn't stay where they were supposed to be.
And I didn't use soup. I found a chicken casserole mix in the cupboard and used that, as I thought it would go better with the stuffing. Cooked the meat in the mix in the microwave, them crumbled the stuffing over it, spread it with mash (because there wasn't enough gratin) and added the gratin on top.
Friend's mother praised it! And asked how I managed to do things at short notice. But she needed extra gravy. Further filing away for the food preparation for her.
Don't know if she is coming tomorrow - she's being discharged tonight. I think they are kicking her out too quickly. This is even less time than last time. Apparently, being more than a week between the two admissions flags it as no problem.
Think I might do macaroni cheese if she does come. With extra things like peas in it. And runny sauce.

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Penny S
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Definitely macaroni cheese. She ordered it today from the hospital menu, and what she got was something like shepherd's pie. What a lot is hidden in that description!
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Baptist Trainfan
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Minced shepherd (or sheepdog), perhaps? [Devil]
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Aravis
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Couscous is good - soft, quick to prepare and it sticks together more than rice, so you don't drop as much while you eat it. It makes a change from mashed potato which features very heavily in most soft diets!

Bread and butter pudding. If you cover the dish while cooking it probably won't crisp up enough to bother her (haven't tried this as I prefer it crispy). You can make a savoury version by omitting the sugar and adding grated cheese instead, and serve with soft veg of some sort.

Sweet potato and squash bake well and become soft, as long as you peel them well, add oil and keep them close together in the tin, and again covering them will help as steam will keep them soft and eliminate the crisp edges which are harder to chew.

PM me if you need any further advice as I can ask the dietitians at work - they come across this problem all the time.

Some ready meal companies do soft diet meals - it might be helpful to have a couple of those in the freezer if she's in and out of hospital at short notice.

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Gee D
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Cook pumpkin in the microwave, then peel and mash it. Scrub the peel first with the potato scrubber. Easier to peel, less waste and cooking it in the microwave gives a much better flavour, and it's not watery. A good base for all sorts of soft things, like minced beef, chicken, lamb, turkey or a lentil casserole.

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Penny S
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Thanks Aravis. Turned out macaroni cheese was definitely not wanted, so I had to improvise with some tins of bolognese sauce, some instant potato and some tinned veggies. Tried cauliflower, but it didn't mash down as well as I thought it would (it was from frozen stuff).

Hadn't thought of cheesy B&B pudding - which I like myself. Would need to get white bread, but that wouldn't be a problem - I like to have some around for normal B&B pudding, Queen of Puddings and such like.

Also had to abandon Apple and Blackberry pudding because of the seeds - good thing she mentioned the problem with raspberries.

I won't go so far as getting ready meals in - I'd like to have meals for all of us, but recipe suggestions from people in the field would be welcome. No need to re-invent the wheel.

I have a suspicion that squash and its allies might not be welcome, based on a discussion over the meal about courgettes (zucchini) and marrows.

[ 21. January 2017, 19:11: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have a suspicion that squash and its allies might not be welcome, based on a discussion over the meal about courgettes (zucchini) and marrows.

Try grating zucchini finely and cooking with a bit of oil or butter. The problems with the marrow family generally are that they go watery very easily and also that they collapse into a tasteless mess.

[ 21. January 2017, 20:21: Message edited by: Gee D ]

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Kittyville
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i came here to post the New Celtic Cooking recipe for butteries for Piglet and Stercus Tauri, but then realised that would be an issue with copyright. Unfortunately, I can't find it online, but I did find a Haity Biker's one on BBC Food which looks very similar (other than using lard as well as butter).
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Piglet
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Here we are. [Smile]

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Stercus Tauri
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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Here we are. [Smile]

Oil... butter... lard... Sounds like the recipe belongs in Hell. Yum!

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Penny S
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Tomorrow will involve pork mince, apple and onion, with cauliflower and broccoli rice cooked with cheese sauce, and potato, carrot and swede mash. Dessert will involve forced rhubarb, breadcrumbs and custard.
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Roseofsharon
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I have left 3/4 kilo shin of beef overnight in the fridge, marinating in red wine, shallots, and a few herbs and spices, Tomorrow they will go in the slow-cooker for 10 hours, to be eaten for dinner with potatoes, cauliflower & savoy cabbage.
I have had the slow cooker for several years, but have hardly used it until this winter, So far, so good.

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Brenda Clough
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I am doing something similar. Only I will probably serve with rutabaga, potatoes and carrots.

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Huia
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Rose of Sharon I think shin beef is absolutely the best meat to cook in a slow cooker. It's also one of the cheapest cuts to buy, which makes it my first choice for cooking.

Yours sounds more interesting than mine though as I am seldom organised enough to get the wine too. Can I come to dinner please?

Huia

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Piglet
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I've never tried shin of beef, but if it's anything like lamb shanks it'll behave beautifully in a slow-cooker.

If time allows, give the meat a bit of a sear first in a spot of olive oil, then de-glaze the pan with a little wine and tip into the slow-cooker with the meat and veggies - it'll give ever such a better flavour and colour.

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Lothlorien
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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Rose of Sharon I think shin beef is absolutely the best meat to cook in a slow cooker. It's also one of the cheapest cuts to buy, which makes it my first choice for cooking.

Yours sounds more interesting than mine though as I am seldom organised enough to get the wine too. Can I come to dinner please?

Huia

Some red wine as Piglet suggests, some crushed tinned tomatoes and some herbs. Check flavours before serving. Sometimes a sprinkle of freshly chopped herbs just before serving adds a wonderful finishing touch.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I need an idea for leftovers tomorrow - I think just for two. On Saturday, I served up a pork dish. Sweated onion, pork mince, broken up apple plus, cheating, a packet of casserole mix which I susoect had sage as an ingredient. This produced a huge amount (from the size of the pack) and I have enough for two (or three if the third doesn't eat much). What I want is a way of varying it. (I have to use it up - there is no room in the freezer, and all the things in there are single portions). Would tinned tomato work well? I don't want to go down the curry route in case the Aged P is involved.
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Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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Cancel that. Tomorrow isn't happening. I can eat stuff out of the freezer to make a space for the pork for future use.
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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

If time allows, give the meat a bit of a sear first in a spot of olive oil, then de-glaze the pan with a little wine and tip into the slow-cooker with the meat and veggies - it'll give ever such a better flavour and colour.

I would normally do that, but this recipe just said put the meat, shallots, herbs & spices in the pot and add the marinade, boiled with a small amount of stock. As I overslept by a considerable amount I didn't have time to do more than that.
It was fine -except that I was concerned by the small amount of liquid, which didn't cover the meat & veg, so I added more stock, and the resulting gravy was disappointingly thin. The meat was extremely tender, and there is enough for seconds - but I will do something to give the gravy more body.
I will try this again, learning from the mistakes made this time - although I'm eying the oxtail in the butchers window with some interest. My mother used to make wonderful oxtail stew

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Posts: 3022 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Oxtail soup wonderfully rich in flavour. I make it at least the day before so fat on top can be removed easily. As it is well over 30 ° C here before 11:00 am, there will be no soup planned for any easily foreseeable meal. I cooked an extra piece of salmon last night and will serve that cold with salad tonight. Just me to consider and I consider that a good plan while this heat lasts.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Stercus Tauri
Shipmate
# 16668

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quote:
Originally posted by Kittyville:
i came here to post the New Celtic Cooking recipe for butteries for Piglet and Stercus Tauri, but then realised that would be an issue with copyright. Unfortunately, I can't find it online, but I did find a Hairy Biker's one on BBC Food which looks very similar (other than using lard as well as butter).

Inter library loan copy just arrived. I have to buy a copy. Didn't someone here quote a reviewer who read recipe books at bed time because he could be assured of happy endings? This is one of those books.

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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Made a clementine cake, from the Nigella Lawson recipe. Take 5 clementines and boil them for 2 hours, how can you resist a recipe that begins like that? It came out a little bland, however -- the next time I may add some rum.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
... I was concerned by the small amount of liquid, which didn't cover the meat & veg, so I added more stock, and the resulting gravy was disappointingly thin.

You'd be surprised at how little liquid you need in a slow-cooker - considerably less than you'd need in the equivalent casserole cooked in the oven or on top of the stove.

If you find at the end of the cooking time that the sauce is too thin, mix together a tablespoon each of flour and butter to form a thick paste (or, if you'd rather, a heaped tablespoon of cornflour/cornstarch mixed with a tablespoon or so of wine or water to form a slurry), turn the heat up to High on the slow-cooker and stir the paste/slurry in. Give it an extra half-an-hour and it should thicken the sauce without doing any harm to the rest of the casserole.

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 18843 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
]You'd be surprised at how little liquid you need in a slow-cooker .

Yes, I do get a bit confused, I know that there is no evaporation, so you need less liquid, but you are also to cover the meat & veg with the liquid, otherwise the top layer dries out. The liquid in this particular recipe was 7fl oz red wine (for the marinade) and 1/4 pt of stock, thickened with cornflour, to 750g meat and 359g shallots. It came nowhere near halfway up
Even with the extra stock there were a couple of crusty bits of meat on top at the end of the cooking time.

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Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

Posts: 3022 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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The crusty bits on the meat are my favorite parts! [Big Grin]

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 17557 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
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# 13815

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You press a sheet of baking paper right down to cover tightly at the sides - keeps everything moist and tender, especially if you have put the meat in first and poured the vegetables and any liquid onto the top.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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