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Source: (consider it) Thread: On the Back Burner: Recipes 2017
Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
You press a sheet of baking paper right down to cover tightly at the sides

Thanks - will try that next time!

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Piglet
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I usually put the veggies in the bottom of the slow-cooker, lay the meat on top and then pour over the wine and stock so that everything gets covered.

Also, despite what the books say about not lifting the lid, I've found that a quick stir (you don't need to have the lid off for more than a few seconds) part-way through the cooking time won't do it any harm, and will help to keep it nice and moist. If you're doing bigger pieces of meat, such as lamb-shanks (which could have been made for slow-cooking), turn them over with tongs so that they stay moist and cook evenly.

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Lothlorien
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Moving on from slow cooker winter foods to summer. It is hot down here in Sydney. One of out hottest summers and whille I generally have only myself to cook for, I take care to make proper attractive meals. Without too much to fuss about them and without much use of the oven to heat my place up.

I had some small chicken thigh fillets left. I cooked them quickly on good oil so they did not dry out. I have just had some balcony pots repotted with herbs which are thriving. I picked lemon thyme and fresh mint which I chopped finely in a bowl. Cubed a mango and added it to bowl. Some good quality chilli flakes to give it some zing. It made a wonderful salsa for the chicken and I had a colourful salad as well. Be careful with the chilli if you do not use it much. I probably put a lot more in than others would.

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la vie en rouge
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The other night we had some people round our house for the purpose of our mutual spiritual edification. Someone brought a load of fruit to share including kiwis. We have four of them left. Neither my husband nor I are very keen on same; does anyone know a recipe we could hide them in to avoid them going to waste?

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Lothlorien
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If you want to tenderise any meat, rubbing with slices of kiwifruit helps considerably. Does not impart the flavour, the enzymes tenderise the meat. Or not just rubbing but leaving sitting in glass dish would do the same.

[ 02. February 2017, 08:53: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Kittyville
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Thanks for that reminder, Lothlorien - I knew that, but had forgotten.
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MaryLouise
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I'm not crazy about kiwi fruit but have used it sliced in a fruit salad with other tropical fruits such as mango, banana, papaya and pineapple. I make a salad dressing with a little orange juice mixed with passionfruit pulp and a teensy splash of white balsamic vinegar. I've served this with plain vanilla ice cream a few times, to some success.

The herb and vegetable garden has survived the drought and I'm making a large jar of basil vinaigrette to store in the fridge as well as pesto with surplus basil and rocket leaves. Plenty of courgettes and ripe tomatoes, so planning vegetable lasagna and Caprese salads for the last of the summer weather.

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Lothlorien
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That sounds interesting, Mary Louise, although I rarely have icecream in the house. Not a fan really. I wish I could say remarks about the last of the summer weather, Still getting two or three days a week around 38 ° C here, a couple more between 32-35 and the rest mostly around high 20s. Today was cooler but it mounts again till next Tuesday. I am glad for many reasons that I do not live in Moree in NW NSW. They have had more than 35 consecutive days of temps round 37.

One son lives in foothills of mountains and another in Sydney's west. Their temperatures are higher again.

[ 02. February 2017, 09:38: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Welease Woderwick

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Here is a neat little idea that I have filched from the brain of Himself -

For a low calorie but tasty dressing for fresh fruit salad mix a little cinnamon powder into some yoghurt and let it stand ab it - for extra taste make a lassi with the yoghurt, cinnamon and a ripe banana - you can even add a date or two.

Yes, you are right, I am spoilt rotten - and I love it!

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Gee D
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Try a passionfruit or 2 in the banana lassi - goes very well indeed and you can easily convince yourself it's healthy.

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Piglet
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There's a lovely Nigella recipe for chicken marinated in yoghurt, cinnamon and lemon, then cooked with cardamom and nuts, and served with saffron rice.

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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MaryLouise
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Those Middle Eastern spices and flavours appeal to me too, Piglet. Next month we'll have ripe pomegranates and quinces, so I plan to make lamb and chicken tagines and some Iranian jewelled rice.

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Celtic Knotweed
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Currently very chuffed. I modified my flapjack recipe to a mix of treacle and golden syrup instead of just golden syrup, and added pumpkin seeds. The resulting batch was strongly approved of by the rest of the office, with one person asking when I was bringing in another batch [Yipee]

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Piglet
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I tried my hand at making tomato chutney today (I used a recipe for Ballymaloe chutney from the interweb), and it doesn't look at all bad. It needs a week or two to mature, so I'm going to have to exercise patience.

[tangent]
I think Patience would be a good name for a dog; when you're taking it for a walk you'd be exercising Patience. [Big Grin]

I'll see myself out.
[/tangent]

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Piglet
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I got some charcuterie at the farmers' market on Saturday, and we had some of it with the tomato chutney and home-made French bread for supper last night.

Definitely a winner, and very easy to make.

Must get myself some more Mason jars; I wonder if the supermarkets here sell "wonky" vegetables at cheap prices?

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Pomona
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Barely a recipe, but tonight's supper was delicious and brought back some childhood memories. Sainsburys sells tins of soft herring roes (also called milts) as part of their Basics range. I remember my nan serving cod and herring milts in my childhood, often in a sort of thick pancake using a basic batter mix. Tonight I had them sauteed with some sliced cooked new potatoes until browned, and then served with salt and malt vinegar. Really delicious and so cheap, and I imagine they'd be really good devilled or with welsh rarebit. I seem to remember cod milts being a bit more delicate in taste and texture but the herring roes are still only mildly fishy and have a wonderful creamy texture. Waitrose sell fresh milts on their fish counters and John West do tinned soft cod roes, in addition to the Sainsburys tins.

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Piglet
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I have a vague memory of liking cod roe when I was very young - IIRC Mum made it into a sort of fish-cake with those bright orange breadcrumbs you used to get in a packet.

In other news, how are everyone's Easter lamb recipes?

I'm playing it safe - slivers of garlic, crushed coriander seeds and rosemary stuffed in slits all over the meat, and baking for about half-an-hour per lb.

Gratin dauphinois potatoes and carrots with orange juice and aniseed to go with it.

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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MaryLouise
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Sounds delicious, Piglet.

I wanted to make roasted cauliflower this year (something different), but this suggestion met with less than resounding enthusiasm from family and friends. So I'm doing a large shoulder of lamb with rosemary, lemon juice, anchovies and Dijon mustard, done in a slow oven for about six or seven hours. With carrots (I may try your way of doing carrots, Piglet), roast potatoes and -- minty peas, perhaps? Followed by apple crumble and custard.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Penny S
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I had a success with a made-up veggie thing the other day. It wouldn't have been a success if the supposed veggie had turned up, because it turns out he is vegan.

However, some wholemeal breadcrumbs, and chopped onion (from out of a tin, I am afraid) and a jar of tomato and ricotta sauce from a discount store I happened to have by me. The mixture layered in a dish with a custard of egg, milk and cheese and topped with grated cheese before baking.

It was praised by my difficult guest!

It also works cold with salad cream. But I have odd tastes.

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MaryLouise
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Penny, the wonderful American food writer Laurie Colwin who wrote Home Cooking had a chapter on what she called 'Nursery Food', to be served to crochety difficult invalids, fussy children and those in need of basic comfort eating. A savoury mush with no hidden surprises.

The Easter Sunday slow-roasted lamb with rosemary, lemon juice & anchovies was delectable and there isn't much left over, so lamb sandwiches with mustard for supper this evening. To the roast, I added quartered onions and a halved bulb of garlic after three hours, and then potatoes for the last hour and everything was caramelised (not crispy) with some oniony brown jus in the bottom of the roasting dish.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Lothlorien
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My son put several anchovies in the gravy he made yesterday from slow cooked leg of lamb. Along with the red wine I poure over the meat, the gravy was thick, dark in colour and rich. Delicious as my mint had died back a bit so no mint sauce freshly made. Hate commercial stuff, far too sweet.

[ 17. April 2017, 06:04: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Penny S
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We had lamb leg steaks yesterday, with fresh mint sauce with the mint from the garden. I'd cut up her meat as it seemed a bit resistant when I tested it with a blade. She then swamped it with ketchup, after liking the sauce! The meat had no flavour, apparently.
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la vie en rouge
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Auguste Escoffier's Provencal recipe: marinade your (boneless) roast with honey, olive oil, mustard seeds, coriander and red pepper corns (and probably a couple of other things I've forgotten). Very, very tasty.
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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
We had lamb leg steaks yesterday, with fresh mint sauce with the mint from the garden. I'd cut up her meat as it seemed a bit resistant when I tested it with a blade. She then swamped it with ketchup, after liking the sauce! The meat had no flavour, apparently.

Have you thought of something such as moussaka or lasagne? Both soft, easy to eat with no need for a knife, just spoon and fork, can taste good and also be nutritious. A green salad if she'll eat that, or some green vegetables on the side - cooked frozen peas are easy enough to eat with spoon and fork, or a pouch of the mixed vegetables now available.

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Brenda Clough
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It was nearly 90 degrees on Easter Sunday here, so we had an archetypically American dinner: thick T-bone steaks on the grill. My son, a young man of hearty appetite, always approves this and my husband does all the grilling. I devoted my energies to cutting up a large head of escarole and braising it with olive oil, garlic, onions and oregano. Everything was eaten up, no leftovers.

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Huia
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Just been reading this through for ideas.

Thanks for the hint re using baking paper in the slow cooker GeeD, it could solve some difficulties.

I noticed some comments regarding kiwifruit. I don't like the original green ones, but I do like the newer golden variety. They are sweeter and smoother skinned. If they're not sufficiently ripe put them in a paper bag with an apple, the gas the apple emits ripens the fruit.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Gee D
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It means that you need little or no added liquid (any wine can be boiled down to little more than a glaze), as the juices from the meat and vegetables will keep things going well, and turn into a much more richly flavoured sauce.

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Piglet
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I've just discovered the joy of cooking with fiddleheads, which are being sold at a stall round the corner from where we live.

We were at a dinner party a while back where the starter was fiddlehead soup, and today I tried to recreate it, with what I think was a fair modicum of success:

Fiddlehead Soup

A little butter and olive oil
8 oz fiddleheads, trimmed and rinsed
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
1 medium potato, peeled and chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 clove garlic, crushed
Salt, pepper and a pinch of basil
About 1½ pints chicken stock
About 6 Tbs double cream

In a casserole, heat the oil and butter over a low-medium heat, adding the veggies as they're prepared along with the garlic and seasonings.

Cover and allow to sweat for about 10 minutes, making sure it doesn't catch.

Add the stock, stir and bring up to a boil.

Turn down the heat, cover and simmer gently for about half an hour or until the veggies are soft.

Remove from the heat, and whizz with an immersion blender until smooth.

Return to the heat, stir in the cream and allow to heat through and serve with good bread and butter.

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Huia
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Is there a culinary, (as opposed to a religious) reason for using kosher salt? The recipe I'm looking at is for potato and leek soup.

Thanks

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Pangolin Guerre
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Piglet: Saffron - judiciously used - also works well. Just a very little. So does fresh tarragon (not together!).

Huia - Kosher salt is not iodised.

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Brenda Clough
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At least in the US, kosher salt is marketed in larger crystals. (Imagine the salt that you see on a pretzel.) So if you're sprinkling it onto something like a steak or a salad, you get a crunch when you bite a crystal. The finer regular salt dissolves faster.
If you're adding it to soup or stew I cannot imagine it makes a difference at all.

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Huia
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Thanks Brenda and Pagolin. I usually ignore the label and use whatever comes to hand for soups, this one's potato and leek. I can see it would make a difference to the 'mouth feel' for the breads and steak though.

When I was a child the only salt we had was common (non iodised) and iodised, both fine - now the variety is a bit bewildering. Mum always used iodised in her cooking because New Zealand lacks some important trace elements in the soil, including iodine.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Piglet
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Thanks, PG - interesting idea, although wouldn't the combination of the yellow of the saffron and the green of the fiddleheads give a kind of weird colour? [Smile]

My only contact with kosher salt (or "koshered" - AIUI the name refers to a process it goes through rather than any religious connotations) was when a friend was going through cancer treatment and had been told she could only have kosher salt, so I baked her some French sticks using it instead of ordinary salt.

As I recall, it came out just as nicely.

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"It's not so much the toes", said Piglet, "as the ears". A. A. Milne
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Pangolin Guerre
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As to the size of the grain of salt, I buy only coarse. I keep a mortar and pestle by the stove, in which I grind my coarse into fine, and leave in the mortar. This way, I always have fine salt at hand for salting pasta water, brining, adding a dash to whatever, and the 'mother box' of coarse in the cupboard. A bit of extra labour, but bespoke granularity.

That's an interesting fact about NZ's soil. In North America almost all salt was iodised (I forget now, but something to do with thyroid, goiters, etc.) I don't know why that is no longer a problem here. Where are the ship's biochemists when you need them?

[ 25. May 2017, 01:50: Message edited by: Pangolin Guerre ]

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MaryLouise
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I use flaky Maldon sea salt which is expensive but used sparingly.

We get iodised Cerebos salt out here in South Africa and that is what was commonly used when I was a child. I am also not sure why iodised salt was thought important in southern Africa and when I next need a distraction from work deadlines I shall Google it.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Huia
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Pangolin, Mum said goitres were common here when she was a child, (and she developed one herself) which is why I use iodised. Selenium is also lacking in the soil which is why farm animals here are dosed with it. Two brazil nuts a day can make up for this (but no more as excess can lead to nasty side effects).

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Gee D
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Both are available here, next to each other on the supermarket shelves. My recollection is of being told that because of the iodine deficiency in our diet (and I can't remember why we have one) we should get the iodised version. Of course that predated the availability of flaked salt grown in the Himalayan streams abounding with dolphins etc, just as mineral water is.

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Welease Woderwick

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# 10424

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No exotics available here but what is available is the low sodium stuff which we tend to use as both Himself and Herself do to tend to like well-salted food. My GP is happy with us doing this and wishes more of his patients would follow suit.

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Piglet
Islander
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We usually have a box of Maldon salt in the larder (it comes from D's part of the world, so we feel that we're helping the Essex economy). We only use it for the table, where it's kept in a mortar and we can take it by the pinch.

For cooking and baking (baking bread uses quite a lot of salt) we just use bog-standard iodised salt which we buy in bulk and keep in a salt-pig beside the stove.

[ 25. May 2017, 21:12: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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What is a salt pig?

Moo

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Gee D
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There are some things for which salt is essential - eg making bread, and of course preserving citrus fruits. Otherwise we basically don't use salt, but will use ham, bacon, anchovies which add both saltiness and their own flavour to dishes.

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Gee D
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A salt pig.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Doesn't the salt clump in humid weather?

Moo

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
There are some things for which salt is essential - eg making bread, and of course preserving citrus fruits. Otherwise we basically don't use salt, but will use ham, bacon, anchovies which add both saltiness and their own flavour to dishes.

I seem to remember that the use of iodised salt in commercial bread down here was made compulsory in NSW some years ago.

Salt is salt as someone in authority pointed out recently, so why buy different types? I know there are some types where I enjoy the flavour more than the common garden variety.

[ 27. May 2017, 10:33: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
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It took me a while to find references. Iodised salt in Australia was made compulsory in 2009.

Link here

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Doesn't the salt clump in humid weather?

Moo

Yes.

We had one of these when I was young, where we kept the salt used in cooking. That salt was already clumpy and not free flowing like the table salt we used on the dining table.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Not for me it didn't and I used one for many years. Sydney in summer is very humid and I had no problems. Used a small carved wooden spoon in it.

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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Doesn't the salt clump in humid weather?

Moo

The theory is that the pig is made from unglazed material and so absorbs the moisture. How it works in practice is another matter and may well depend on your climate.

[ 28. May 2017, 04:12: Message edited by: Gee D ]

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
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Mine was unglazed terracotta and worked fine.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
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Sorry about duplication. No idea how that happened and deleting one post did not work, even within edit time.

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