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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » On the Back Burner: Recipes 2017 (Page 3)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: On the Back Burner: Recipes 2017
Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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It always amuses me that the salts from different geaological deposits are assumed to not be sea salt, when the formation of the stuff demands a sea for it to be formed in, since the sodium and chloride ions are not from the same sources and have to meet each other after erosion. Thus mined salt from Cheshire is from the Zechstein Sea, and the Alpine and Himalayan salts from the Tethys Ocean. Probably a lot purer than Maldon and even Anglesey though.
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Piglet
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# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Doesn't the salt clump in humid weather?

I find that our salt-pig, which is a sort of ship's-funnel shape rather like
this, works fairly well at keeping the salt dry - I suppose it must be something to do with the opening being on the side rather than the top.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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On a recent visit to Younger Son & DiL I pinched some recipes from a cookbook she has just bought. Yesterday we sampled Kuku Sabzi, and it has gone straight to the top of our favourites list.
It caught my eye because one of the main ingredients is Swiss chard, and we are trying to eat our way through a late glut of tender leaves from last years chard crop before this years is ready for picking, and also so that I can clear the bed for something else.

Anyway, Kuku Sabzi is a Persian dish, a bit like a herby frittata, but with less egg and more filling.
This one had 1 large leek, sliced and cooked in olive oil, about 500g chard shredded, washed & well drained. and 80g+ of mixed soft green herbs (I used dill, tarragon, parsley & chervil), chopped. All mixed together with enough eggs just to bind the greens together, seasoned and cooked just like a frittata.
Served with toasted flatbreads and a tomato & cucumber salad.

Looking online I see that many recipes use just herbs and no other greens, and many add barberries, turmeric, and walnuts, but we were very happy using what grows in the garden

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I have made soup today. I sat there staring at the just shucked peapods, and thought that I had heard of them being of use. Tracked down a recipe in a wartime haybox recipe book, and with my slow cooker, some turkey stock, some whey and the peas and mint made a passable soup. The pods get disposed of after initial cooking in the stock. I added pureeing the peas after they were cooked as they kept escaping the blender while in the liquid. It tastes quite good. Unfortunately no-one else to taste it yet. I omitted the milk, but did thicken with flour.
My taster is now ready to try.

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Penny S
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Taster 2 liked it and had more than the sample. Taster 1 said they didn't like it, it was a waste of effort, and then said they had to be honest, it was vile.
Taster 2 disagreed.
I drank a mugful, and think it probably needed something extra but I am not sure what. Curiously none of the ingredients I used was salt or had been salted, but there was something salty about it. Probably wasn't the best use of my husbanded turkey stock.

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Gee D
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# 13815

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Thickening soup with flour????

Fortunately I was sitting down when I read that. If you're going to thicken, then cook a potato in the soup and purée that. Excellent at thickening, and tastes good.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Penny S
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# 14768

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Wartime recipe. And our family rabbit stew recipe is flour thickened, so it didn't seem odd to me. But I think some potato might be a good idea to add to the rest.
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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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My stand-by additive to add that Little Something is a shake of Worcestershire Sauce. This only applies to savoury dishes - I don't think it works with things like trifle!

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L'organist
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# 17338

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You need Umami: either as a paste (find it in supermarkets) or naturally occurring, so for your soup I'd say look at tomato puree or mushrooms.

Simple fix for all things savoury in this household is a shake of soy sauce: for marinades try adding a dash of angostura bitters, which also work well with sweet things. And never make a syrup for fruit salad, instead puree a handful of raspberries with a little Dubonnet, strain and use that instead.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Thickening soup with flour????

Absolutely core to potage paysanne imo: the little roux with the bacon fat and stock at the beginning is transformative.

Also, in the more refined embodiment of buerre manie it's rescued many a sauce.

[ 14. July 2017, 09:47: Message edited by: Firenze ]

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Penny S
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I had been thinking along the Worcestershire sauce line, also, tomato, but had forgotten mushroom, of which I have some ketchup.
When I get it out of the freezer for private use I'll have a go with those.
I think Taster 1 might have responded better if I'd used some green colouring. The turkey overwhelmed the pea colour.

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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Thickening soup with flour????

Absolutely core to potage paysanne imo: the little roux with the bacon fat and stock at the beginning is transformative.

Also, in the more refined embodiment of buerre manie it's rescued many a sauce.

Beurre manié in a sauce yes, but not a soup. In the potage, it's a tiny amount of flour cooked at the beginning to add its flavour. Very different to the addition to which Penny S refers.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Meh. Freshly picked nits. Flour is a thickening agent. if you have something that needs thickening and that's what you have to hand.... Improvisation is the soul of cookery.

Plus my grannie used to do it, so it is therefore clearly Right.

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I don't think [Worcestershire sauce] works with things like trifle!

Please tell me this isn't the voice of experience ... [Eek!]

I've never used flour to thicken soup (my soups tend to be quite thick enough of their own accord, usually by virtue of a handful or two of pulses of some sort); if they're not, I'd probably just add another potato. I use buerre manié to thicken the sauce in casseroles - or, if time is short, a slurry of cornflour mixed with a little wine or water.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 18986 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
MaryLouise
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# 18697

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Out here in the Cape we have maizena, cornflour, and I use that although it can flatten the taste if used with delicate flavours (parsnip soup). I find that if I dust chunks of beef or lamb in seasoned flour before browning, that helps to thicken the sauce or stock.

My standby for flavour oomph is a little sweet smoked paprika, not of course for trifle.

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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The only time I use flour is to make a roux for gumbo. (Mmmm...gumbo!) Most of my soups are made with broth from chicken or turkey carcasses, and seem to be pretty thick after throwing in all the other stuff I can find in the fridge.

Soup is the bomb! It was my secret weapon to get young Daughter-Unit to eat vegetables, since she loved soup. She had no idea that gumbo (her favorite) was full of okra, peppers and onions!

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
...[soup] was my secret weapon to get young Daughter-Unit to eat vegetables ...

D. reckons the mark of a good restaurant is to make soup that he likes from vegetables that he doesn't. [Big Grin]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 18986 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Barnabas Aus
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# 15869

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As promised in All Saints, herewith the recipe for slow cooker orange and brandy marmalade. Still trialling the mandarin recipe, so will report back later

Ingredients

3 large lemons, quartered
6 large oranges quartered
1 1/2 kg of caster sugar
1/4 pint of Brandy

Instructions

Take the quartered lemons and oranges and quarter them.In 3 batches use the grater attachment on a food processor to blitz the fruit up.
Add all the blitzed fruit into the slow cooker and add the caster sugar.Give it a real good stir.
Put the slow cooker on high for 6 hours, giving it a stir every 2 hours making sure get all the sugar off the bottom off the pot.It should be quite thick, and a very dark orangey brown colour.
Switch off the slow cooker and take the pot out of the base.
Place 8 small to medium sized clean jars in the oven on 150°c/Gas 2 for 20 minutes.
Stir the Brandy into the marmalade.
Take the jars carefully out of the oven using oven gloves and place them on a baking tray.
Take a funnel and using a ladle decant the marmalade into the jars.I reused jars I’ve been keeping for preserves.Screw the tops on after half an or so once the jars have cooled down.The orange and Brandy marmalade sets on cooling.
Keep stored in a dark cupboard and eat within 3 years, but I don’t think you’ll leave it that long.Once open, keep in the fridge and use within 6 months.

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Clarence
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# 9491

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Thank you BA, it looks very achievable. I can even use our own lemons [Yipee]

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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The local big-brand convenience store sells off speckled bananas at 4p each, and as i like a banana sliced into my porridge in the morning we stock up whenever they put them out. I also turn them into a variety of quick desserts, or an easy chocolate/banana cake.
This week mr Lil and I went in separately and both brought home a bagful, so now i have a banana glut as well as the usual courgette glut.
Time to try a courgette & banana cake recipe or two! [Razz]

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Penny S
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I fished out some readymade ready-rolled shortcrust pastry from my freezer to convert leftover mince into a pie, only to find that some of it has dried into curls.
Before I throw it out for the birds, has anyone any idea of how I could use it for human consumption? It occurred to me that it is not unlike pasta, and could be used for a version of macaroni cheese or similar.

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wild haggis
Apprentice
# 15555

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Don't know if you can do anything with pastry gone into curls. Why not try coating it with grated cheese to make cheese straws?

But sounds as if it has been watching "Frozen" for too long.

I had a glut of courgettes a few years back and a neighbour gave me a recipe for a wonderful courgette chocolate cake.

I loved it and so did others.
Not my husband though - but then I think he just thought courgettes and cake didn't mix.

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wild haggis

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Roseofsharon
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I do have a tried & tested Courgette & Chocolate cake, but the recipe ! found for courgette & banana cake gives a superior result. It will certainly be my go-to recipe whenever the supermarket's glut of over-ripe bananas coincides with my courgette glut.

the only problem with courgette cakes (and any using fresh veg or frui) is that the glut often comes during humid weather, and these cakes do not keep long in those conditions.
Luckily, we had several visitors in the next day or so after I made the courgette & banana. [Razz] [Razz]

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Posts: 3032 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged



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