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Source: (consider it) Thread: On the Back Burner: Recipes 2017
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Of course all food is primped for the photographs. It's there to entice you to buy the book/magazine/ingredients/ready meal.

I remember having coffee in the outdoor space of a nearby cafe - which had been chosen as the locale for an advertising shoot for a brand of cider. While the photographer took his zillions of shots of the product, it was the job of one of the attendant young women to continually spritz the bottle to give it the appearance of dew-fresh chill.

Come to think of it, most of my favourite cookbooks just run to the odd line drawing.

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I once knew a man who published cookbooks. He told me the ingredients in photos in such books are usually raw to preserve vibrant colours. .

That has been standard practice in cookbooks for many years, and isn't the only photographic 'cheat' that is used. I am surprised that it was news to you.
It's hardly fair to blame him, he would probably be out of business if his food photography wasn't up to the standard of all the other glossy food-porn for sale these days.

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MaryLouise
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Lothlorien, that might be why the raw vegan dishes on Instagram always look so luscious. Cooked food is mostly brown and no amount of food colouring or rose-tinted lighting can do much about that.

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LutheranChik
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My mother was an excellent cook, and there aren't too many dishes I can make that she didn't make better...but I recently discovered the joy of poaching eggs in custard cups instead of slipping the eggs directly into the water. I can't believe it took me 56 years to learn this trick, but it means many more poached eggs at our house...no more raggedy edges. (You start out by cracking each egg into a small, heat-proof, buttered custard cup; placing the cups in a pan you fill with maybe an inch and a half or two inches of water, closing the lid tightly, bringing the water to a simmer and then cooking for maybe five minutes, until the white goes opaque but the yolk is still soft.)

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Leorning Cniht
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You know you can buy an egg-poacher, right? Shallow pan with lid, insert containing 4 or 6 non-stick cups each ready for one egg. Looks like this.

I think something very much like this was my second cooking acquisition as a student (after the toaster). I am aware that it is possible to poach eggs "naked" but I never have.

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LutheranChik
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In my case I was trying to think of ways to use a set of custard cups that were in an auction box lot we bought years ago, that just kept migrating from cupboard to cupboard, and somehow survived our move as other things were left behind. I'm a whim I Googled "poaching eggs in custard cups."

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Celtic Knotweed
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A plea for help! We managed to get tomatillo seeds to grow this year, so 2 plants promptly took over the end of the greenhouse. Any recipes or suggestions for using the resultant fruits? Being in the UK, they aren't something that shows up in the local shops, so I have no real idea about their use.

Did have a look in the one Mexican cookbook I own - that had a grand total of 2 recipes using them!

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Golden Key
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CW--

Maybe they can be preserved? (Dried, canned, frozen...) I haven't cooked with them; but ISTM most foods can be preserved, and that would take some pressure off of you. There must be instructions online.

Good luck! [Smile]

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Gee D
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A very quick search yields this:

https://whatscookingamerica.net/tomatillos.htm

The introductory paragraph will give you a pretty good idea about them.

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LutheranChik
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Tomatillos make a delicious salsa verde. We canned some many years ago, and it waa one of our better cooking experiments. It included garlic, onions, jalapeños, lime, a little sugar, cilantro...one of our favorite uses for salsa verse is white chili -- chicken, chicken broth, onion, garlic, salsa verde, cumin, kalapeños, white beans. Great with a squeeze of lime, some chopped cilantro and a dollop of sour cream.

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Piglet
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A friend has given us a rosemary plant in a pot, which is lovely, as it's the very nicest herb to put in anything that has lamb in it, and also makes a delicious flavouring for bread-sticks.

I made a batch the other day of the twisted, soft rather than crunchy type: I mixed some finely-chopped rosemary with a little olive oil in a bowl that had been rubbed with a cut garlic clove and brushed the sticks with the mixture before baking them, and they were really rather good.

I might make some actual proper rosemary-and-garlic oil and let it steep for a while, and it's great being able to snip off a twiglet or two whenever I need it.

I've kept it indoors: I hope it'll be happy enough beside a window throughout the winter (it certainly wouldn't survive outside!).

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Bishops Finger
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Yes, indeed, rosemary is yet another indication that God loves us, and that She wants us to be happy.

I'm partial to a nice, grilled Lamb Chop, and sometimes brush it with crushed garlic, or at other times with some dried rosemary (depending on whether I'm appearing in Public later in the day).

The Episcopal Palace, alas, doesn't run to a garden as such, but next year (DV) I intend to grow a bit of rosemary, and a bit of mint, in pots.

Supper-time approaches - Garlic Chicken Kievs (baked in the newly-lit Episcopal Stove), a Baked Potato (lightly brushed with Olive Oil and Salt), and, if I feel like it (!), a glass of red WINE.

[Big Grin]

IJ

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LutheranChik
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I love rosemary too. Any tips for getting it to survive the winter indoors? I have a goot- tall shrub on our patio, and we're approaching hard frost weather here. I have a glass kitchen slider door with a southern exposure where I could keep it, but I know they can be tricky to keep alive.

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Bishops Finger
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I thought rosemary was a fairly hardy shrub - it seems to survive Ukland winters without too much trouble (once established), but it has to be admitted (despite what President Barking Dog thinks) that global warming may have something to do with that.

We have a couple of small bushes (about a foot high) in the garden at Our Place - on the north side, but catching the sun from east and west in early morning and late afternoon.

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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ThunderBunk

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Rosemary hates wet winters, or at least having cold wet feet during winter. It survives in the far east (R) because of the exceptionally good drainage, i.e. the fact that our soil consists mostly of sand.

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Bishops Finger
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Well, the spot I mentioned is well-drained, so that obviously helps. Thanks for the info!

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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Pigwidgeon

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# 10192

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The planter that runs along my front walk is planted with rosemary -- it loves the Arizona climate.

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Lothlorien
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# 4927

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The window sill may not be the best place for it. It needs light but heat exchange through glass from hot to cold will create a draught that it probably won’t like at all. Certainly rosemary hates over watering and wet feet.

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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Lucky enough here in the southern hemisphere to have bushes of rosemary alongside lavender, sage, origanum all year round.

Minced rosemary tips are delicious topping focaccia together with a little chopped black olive and grated Parmesan or crumbled feta.

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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Minced rosemary tips are delicious topping focaccia together with a little chopped black olive and grated Parmesan or crumbled feta.

An excellent combination. Try it with sliced potatoes being slipped into the oven to cook, sprayed with good olive oil. The thing to avoid at all costs is the inevitable pairing of lamb and rosemary. It's a good combination but don't do it every time. Roast the lamb sprigged with anchovy and thyme, and save the rosemary and garlic for potatoes as a variation.

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ArachnidinElmet
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# 17346

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I have a couple of recipes for rosemary loaf cake. A bit counterintuitive, but it's a tasty plain cake, similar to madeira, for eating with a cuppa or apple sauce or plain yoghurt.

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LutheranChik
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I have had rosemary infused chocolate truffles before -- a chocolate shop we occasionally visit has a quintet of herb-y truffle flavors -- I was skeptical, but I enjoyed them. I'd definitely try them in a sweet cake.

Rosemary isn't hardy in Michigan. I figure I'll bring it inside later this fall, and if it starts to decline I'll just prune off all the branches and freeze them, something I've done before...the flavor is still much better than dried rosemary.

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Piglet
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Thanks for all the rosemary tips. It's not actually on the windowsill, but on a table in front of the (north-facing) window.

I've been giving it a cup or two of water if the soil feels dry - is that likely to be too much? - and taking the twiglets from the top to stop it getting too leggy.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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Herbs like things well-drained--if you don't have it sitting in a saucer with wet feet, and if you poke your finger in a bit and it's dry there too, go ahead and water.

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John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
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quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
I love rosemary too. Any tips for getting it to survive the winter indoors? I have a goot- tall shrub on our patio, and we're approaching hard frost weather here. I have a glass kitchen slider door with a southern exposure where I could keep it, but I know they can be tricky to keep alive.

I bring mine in every winter (it grows in a largish pot) and put it with my bay trees (also in pots) in a front window that faces south, but has a fairly large overhang , so no direct sunlight. House stays at about 18-19 celsius during the day, cooler at night. Don't over water, and it does just fine -- flowers once or twice a winter.

While I know rosemary overwinters just fine just about everywhere in the UK (once saw some awesome rosemary hedges in Edinburgh, about 5 feet tall), Michigan is a different matter altogether.

John

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
... awesome rosemary hedges in Edinburgh ...

My sister had a pretty awesome rosemary bush in her garden just outside Edinburgh; AFAIK it was planted in the ground, and didn't need to be taken in for the winter.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Lothlorien
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# 4927

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This is possibly an inheritance from British colonialsm here but here goes. It is spring here and i have been having an enormous salad with tin of tuna, cheese, cold leftovers etc for protein.I enjoy it for lunch. I bought a piece of corned silverside the other day and have just cooked it for lunches for some days. The usual treatment is into a large saucepan with a peeled onion, mine was large so I cut it in two. A few tablespoons of brown sugar and about the same volume of vinegar as there is sugar.

Cover with water, put lid on and bring to boil. Simmer gently, 30 minutes for every 500 gm. Turn heat off and leave to cool in the liquid if it is to be served cold. If serving hot with parsley sauce it can be removed and sliced.

I obviously have not used vinegar in quite a while. I had a small bottle from a winery in Southern Highlands of raspberry wine vinegar. Very expensive. Two bottles of red wine vinegar and no plain, ordinary vinegar at all. I used the red wine vinegar. Meat was different but very good. No obvious taste of red wine, but just an unusual but very good, full flavour.

Mine is now sliced and will be used over the next week or so, however long it lasts.

I have added both malt and cider vinegars to my shopping list.

[ 12. October 2017, 04:46: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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LutheranChik
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I pulled a pound roll of what E1 and I thought was ground pork, only to find that it is breakfast sausage...I still made it into a,meatloaf with shredded apple insude and bacon on top, and hope it will be tasry ( it smells very good in the oven), even though it comes perilousky close to breaking E1's rule about no breakfast foods for supper.

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Celtic Knotweed
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Many thanks for tomatillo suggestions, will be trying them out as we get a chance to pick tomatillos. [Smile]

LutheranChik - what's the different between breakfast sausage and any other sausages? Round here I would put the same sort of sausage in a fried breakfast as I would bake in toad-in-the-hole for dinner.

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Roseofsharon
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My double oven is now only a single oven, as the smaller one has died and cannot be repaired as it is obsolete - so the slow cooker is back in use to save cooker space when we have visitors.

Younger Son & family visited last weekend and I rather fancied making a slow cooker tagine - but YS doesn't eat lamb (following a childhood trauma) so I traipsed round the butchers in the surrounding area and eventually found one that sold goat meat, as that seemed to be nearer the authentic taste than beef.

I'd never cooked goat before, so was a little anxious, but it was tender and delicious. [Razz]

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LutheranChik
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Celtic Knotweed: This side of the pond, breakfast sausage ( very often sold loose or in patties) tends to be heavy on the sage, with marjoram, savory, maybe rosemary, and pepper...occasionally a sweet element like maple syrup may be added. It's a much more assertive sausage than, say, a bratwurst. It's a popular stuffing/dressing ingredient, for the same reason.

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Brenda Clough
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Thanksgiving is approaching in the US. I told the Washington Post about my family's recipe for sticky rice stuffing, and they published it here!

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Lyda*Rose

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Thanksgiving is approaching in the US. I told the Washington Post about my family's recipe for sticky rice stuffing, and they published it here!

Looks yummy! I copied it into my recipe file. [Smile]

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Brenda Clough
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For those of you who don't want to use up a Washington Post click, here's the recipe on my blog!

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Sipech
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# 16870

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Do folks here know if you can store onion bhajis once cooked?

Background: For my birthday I received a load of curry kits, included in which was a pouch full of ingredients for doing the 'perfect' bhaji - a food which I have never cooked before in my life.

With most of the curries, I was OK to cook it all up together and then freeze portion by portion (I should probably add that I live by myself and so only ever cook for one) but don't know if that'll work with a bhaji.

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Curiosity killed ...

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According to the packs of ready made curries in the supermarkets you can freeze onion bhajis. I've done it a few times and they've been fine.

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
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Improvised meal chez rouge and damn tasty (essentially this came about as a result of having much leftover samosa filling):

Peel 500g of potatoes and two carrots and chop into small dice. Cook in salted boiling water until soft. Break up with a potato masher (the potatoes will break up more than the carrots) leaving a bit of texture. Add one tin of green peas.

Finely chop one yellow onion. Heat some vegetable oil. Pop one teaspoon of cumin seeds and add two teaspoons of curry and one of mild paprika. Add the onion and sweat until translucent. Mix with the other vegetables and add a bit of chopped ham.

Tip all the above in an oven dish and cover with grated cheese. Bake in oven.

Cheap, warming and very yummy.

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Graven Image
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# 8755

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I made Pho with left over turkey from Thanksgiving. I just used regular recipe for Pho and used the turkey for stock in place of chicken. Outstanding was the response all around..
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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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I'm currently waiting for a chicken curry to cook. It's based on a recipe in the Leftovers chapter in the old Delia Smith books, and uses both curry powder and real spices (ginger, turmeric, cumin). I didn't have everything the recipe called for, so did a bit of substitution, (chopped small potatoes in place of a green pepper - not sure how that'll work out), but it smells quite good.

I'd better go and turn off the heat under it ...

* * *

... have now added the cream and turned off the heat; it should all meld nicely between now and tomorrow lunch-time. [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19766 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
MaryLouise
Shipmate
# 18697

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Sounds tasty, Piglet. I like to make raitas of chopped tomato, onion and coriander, yoghurt with mint and naan breads on the side,together with a big dollop of Mrs Ball's Homemade Chutney.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

Posts: 521 | From: Cape Town | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
Kittyville
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# 16106

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quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Improvised meal chez rouge and damn tasty. Cheap, warming and very yummy.

This Is my sort of recipe, LVeR - simple, tasty, almost endlessly variable.
Posts: 289 | From: Sydney | Registered: Dec 2010  |  IP: Logged
Mamacita

Lakefront liberal
# 3659

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I spent the weekend making use of Thanksgiving leftovers and now have a good supply of soup in the freezer. I also made a few batches of my mother's turkey tetrazzini recipe, a favorite from my childhood. Here it is:

Prepare 7 oz spaghetti, broken into thirds. While this is simmering, prepare the sauce:

Melt butter ¼ C butter. Mix together ¼ C flour, ½ t salt, and ¼ t pepper. Add this to the melted butter, stirring until texture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat. Stir in 1C chicken broth and 1C heavy (whipping) cream. Heat to boiling, stirring constantly. Boil 1 minute. When the mixture has thickened and you have a nice white sauce, add 2T sherry or white wine.

Drain and rinse the spaghetti. Add it to the white sauce, then stir in 2 C cubed chicken or turkey and 1 can sliced mushrooms, drained.*
Pour into baking dish. Sprinkle with 1/4 C grated Parmesan. Bake at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes, just until heated through and bubbly in center.

*This time, in lieu of canned mushrooms, I sauteed some fresh sliced mushrooms in butter, along with a handful of sliced celery. I liked this substitution and will use this in future.

Freezes well. Go easy on the parmesan - it gets greasy.

[ 28. November 2017, 18:13: Message edited by: Mamacita ]

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Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief. Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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Yum, Mamacita!

Every year we send our family canisters of my Russian tea cakes, ie, little, round, barely sweet nut shortbreads rolled in powdered sugar twice, once whilewarm from the oven and then when totally cooled to get an apppealing glaze. I am thinking of adding one more treat to the packages, but am torn between another sweet treat and something savory, like a snack mix or savory nuts.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6356 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged



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