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Source: (consider it) Thread: Hope This Helps: General Enquiries 2017
BroJames
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# 9636

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
There is an entry in our church records in 1720 which reads "Payment to smith for mending the bell rackle" (or it might be raickle).

What is a bell rackle / raickle?

We don't know exactly when our bell was made, but other bells by the same maker are dated between 1713 and 1717. There is an entry in the records in 1713 recording a payment to the smith for mending the bell tow, which I assume was the bell rope.

Collins English Dictionary describes 'rackle' as an archaic Scottish term for a chain, and the Dictionary of the Scots Language confirms your thought about the bell tow.
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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Thank you!

I wonder if the bell chain was being mended in order to hang the new bell? The surviving accounts are for small items, large expenses such as the bell itself must have been recorded separately, through a different account.

The bell still exists, but is no longer rung.

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BroJames
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# 9636

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St. Ninian's Priory still ring theirs on a Sunday morning, though I suspect it is newer than yours.

I think one of the example texts in the second dictionary I looked up talked about the bell being overused and the tackle and tow needing to be fixed.

[ 07. September 2017, 13:14: Message edited by: BroJames ]

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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We broadcast a recording of a bell ringing, which can be heard for several hundred yards. I think most people assume the bell itself is ringing.

We also have a second, much smaller bell, more of a large handbell size, which is known as "the funeral bell" although I've no idea when it was last rung at a funeral, or indeed when it was last rung at all. I also have no idea how old it is, whether it predates the main bell, etc.

Perhaps as I trawl through the records I'll find out more.

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Stercus Tauri
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# 16668

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I hope I haven't asked this before. If so, apologies etc.

When we were leaving the hospital in Fife with our newborn daughter, many years ago, the nurse asked us which door we had entered by when my wife was in labour, and made sure we left by a different one. I've asked many people if they had heard of this superstition, and no-one ever has. Anyone here know the reason for it? Was it just a local custom?

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Another question ... we are now in LA and want to see the Queen Mary. We don't drive, but we thought it looked possible to get to Long Beach by metro. But I can't see where we go from there. Is there a bus, or do we need to get a taxi?

Well, rats! I wish I'd seen this. I live in Long Beach and work downtown, and I could have helped with this. Did you get down here to see the QM?
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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
I hope I haven't asked this before. If so, apologies etc.

When we were leaving the hospital in Fife with our newborn daughter, many years ago, the nurse asked us which door we had entered by when my wife was in labour, and made sure we left by a different one. I've asked many people if they had heard of this superstition, and no-one ever has. Anyone here know the reason for it? Was it just a local custom?

A distant bell is ringing at the back of my mind but details aren't clear.
It was something about it was okay to go out by a different/same door if you had sat down in the house.
I hope someone can supply the correct details!

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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Hmmm, my mother still reminds us to go back out the same door we entered in. I'm not sure where that superstition comes from, but I'll ask tomorrow. There seem to be different versions of the same idea.

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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I found info about door folklore/superstitions at "The Psychic Well". Maybe 20-25 items.

Some of the in/out stuff evidently has to do with which door is reserved for taking out the dead.

--------------------
Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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I've heard of old Dutch/Afrikaner settler homesteads where two doors were created at the front of the house, one for the exclusive use of those taking out the coffin of any householder who died.

It sounds extremely impractical.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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Re doors:

There was a TV series called "The Incredible Journey Of Dr. Meg Laurel", starring Lindsey Wagner as an Appalachian woman who went back home to bring them modern medicine.

At one point, the local healer (?) said "Birth and death should never be in the same house". So deceased person had to be removed before a baby could come in. IMHO, that could have a medical basis, if the person died of anything infectious.

--------------------
Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

Posts: 17556 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sparrow
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# 2458

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quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Another question ... we are now in LA and want to see the Queen Mary. We don't drive, but we thought it looked possible to get to Long Beach by metro. But I can't see where we go from there. Is there a bus, or do we need to get a taxi?

Well, rats! I wish I'd seen this. I live in Long Beach and work downtown, and I could have helped with this. Did you get down here to see the QM?
Yes we did thanks. We got the Metro to Long Beach and then the free Passport bus to the QM. She was gorgeous!

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Stercus Tauri
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# 16668

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quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
I found info about door folklore/superstitions at "The Psychic Well". Maybe 20-25 items.

Some of the in/out stuff evidently has to do with which door is reserved for taking out the dead.

Some good stories on that website - thank you. I am wondering if the young nurse in Dunfermline was confusing her superstitions, though. The idea of not leaving by the same door as a corpse is understandable, but surely not in a hospital where these things are done a bit more discreetly.

Sort of on the topic, we had a talk at the church by an undertaker who explained that many older houses have double front doors so a coffin can be carried out in a dignified manner. For a while it was the fashion in some bigger new houses, but the owners probably had no idea of the origin.

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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Robert Armin

All licens'd fool
# 182

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Does anyone know why different parts of the world have different electric plugs? As a Brit I'm used to 3 square pins, and have to take an adaptor with me when I travel abroad (as I'm about to). Many countries have only two round pins, which looks unsafe to me, yet presumably work well. Why is there this variety?

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Keeping fit was an obsession with Fr Moity .... He did chin ups in the vestry, calisthenics in the pulpit, and had developed a series of Tai-Chi exercises to correspond with ritual movements of the Mass. The Antipope Robert Rankin

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Wesley J

Silly Shipmate
# 6075

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While I'm unable to provide an explanation of the variation of plugs and sockets right now, while-u-wait, here's an overview of all the types there are. Interesting that some combine, and some combine unsafely! [Eek!]

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Be it as it may: Wesley J will stay. --- Euthanasia, that sounds good. An alpine neutral neighbourhood. Then back to Britain, all dressed in wood. Things were gonna get worse. (John Cooper Clarke)

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Robert Armin:
Does anyone know why different parts of the world have different electric plugs? As a Brit I'm used to 3 square pins, and have to take an adaptor with me when I travel abroad (as I'm about to). Many countries have only two round pins, which looks unsafe to me, yet presumably work well. Why is there this variety?

I suspect it's simply due to the electrical systems of the world developing separately and many countries following the lead of their colonial masters. To take an analogous parallel, the railway gauges of Britain, Ireland, Spain and Russia (to mention only Europe) are different although the British lead in construction meant that "standard" gauge became widely used. (And don't even mention Australia!)

The British system was a deliberate attempt in the 1940s to create a new, safe and universal system. In particular it included shuttered sockets (so you couldn't electrocute yourself by poking anything into the holes) and fused plugs. An omission was shielded pins which meant that something dropped behind a half-inserted plug could become live - this has now been rectified. A major drawback is the large size of the plugs.

The "Continental" system provides fewer safety features although earthed sockets are available for larger appliances. Of course many appliances today are double-insulated and don't need earthing although that was less common 50 years ago. In this case the British earthing pin is a dummy, serving merely to open the shutter mechanism for the other two pins.

[ 18. September 2017, 10:16: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
I found info about door folklore/superstitions at "The Psychic Well". Maybe 20-25 items.

Some of the in/out stuff evidently has to do with which door is reserved for taking out the dead.

Some good stories on that website - thank you. I am wondering if the young nurse in Dunfermline was confusing her superstitions, though. The idea of not leaving by the same door as a corpse is understandable, but surely not in a hospital where these things are done a bit more discreetly.

Sort of on the topic, we had a talk at the church by an undertaker who explained that many older houses have double front doors so a coffin can be carried out in a dignified manner. For a while it was the fashion in some bigger new houses, but the owners probably had no idea of the origin.

Looking through that and other sites, the folklore varied. (By location or culture, I presume.) But I wonder if "take a newborn in one door and out the other" is a symbolic way of not reversing what happened--i.e. the baby's birth?

--------------------
Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

Posts: 17556 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged



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