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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017? (Page 2)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017?
georgiaboy
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Just finished Jill Paton Walsh's 'The Attenbury Emeralds,' her latest addition to the Peter Wimsey canon.

I had put it off, as some Sayers' fans dislike her treatments, and supposed variance from the canonical character set, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. A good twist at the end, too.

spoiler alert/


A major segment of the book covers the fire that destroys the Wimsey ancestral home, and the death of the Duke. This results, of course, in Lord Peter ascending to the dukedom, with all the twists and turns relevant to that. While I am no expert of these things, I could spot no inaccuracies.

end alert/

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Brenda Clough
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It is that section of the book, solely, that IMO comes to life. The rest of it, meh.

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MaryLouise
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Started Kim Stanley Robinson's Aurora over the weekend.The quality of the writing makes every line a pleasure to read. I should read more sci fi this year.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Twilight

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To the Bright Edge of the World, by Eowen Ivey. A military man's exploratory trip through Alaska in the late 19th century, spliced by letters from his wife whose difficult pregnancy kept her behind, connected by a crow who flies between them.

Ivey is a very talented writer who is wonderful at creating atmosphere, but I just didn't fall into this one the way I did her The Snow Child. I think maybe I just didn't love the characters quite as much. It's hard to say what the problem was. Maybe just with me, because they both get rave reviews from many sources.

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mousethief

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Just finished Watership Down for the third or fourth time. Was struck by the parallels to Lord of the Rings -- especially in the detailed descriptions of the flora. If you hated LotR because he told you all about the trees and shrubs, you won't like WD, which tells you all about the sort of plants that rabbits eat, and don't eat, and avoid, and don't notice.

Ripping good adventure though.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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Brenda Clough
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JRRT's worldbuilding did not, mostly, extend down to the plant and vegetation level. The characters eat potatoes, cut oaks, and so on. Adams also worked completely with the flora and fauna of central England. The real creativity and worldbuilding in both cases was all cultural -- the construction of language and culture and legend. In this I would argue that Adams is JRRT's equal.

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Lamb Chopped
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I'm glad Tolkien mostly didn't mess with flora and fauna etc. (though there is elanor, of course, and things like kingsfoil--and huge giant spiders). But by keeping most of this stuff familiar, he gave his worlds a kind of homeyness and believability that IMHO they would not have had if everything had been strange and not just the language and culture.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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mousethief

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He didn't mess with it, but he described it in such detail that most of the people who don't like Tolkien, in my hearing at least, cite as their #1 reason the dreary cataloguing (as they will have it) of all the various flora in the places the characters pass through. "Page after page of what trees there were" is how I've heard it described. I think it adds some realism and context to the story, but then again I'm a multi-multi-multi reader so clearly I'm not put off by it.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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Trudy Scrumptious

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This isn't exactly in the "What I'm Reading" but "What I'm Buying Because I've Read Before and Will Surely Read Again" category, but I'm sharing here because I'm excited about it. I just realized last night that there's a relatively recent re-issue of all the Sayers Lord Peter novels in good-quality trade paperback from Hodder & Stoughton. Looking online, it looks like these have been out for awhile already, probably in the UK, but here in Canada the first couple are available and the rest are being released a few at a time over the next few months.

My Sayers collection is a ragtag assemblage of cheap mass-market paperbacks bought at secondhand stores, with some books missing altogether because I either borrowed them from the library or downloaded them as e-books. None of the physical books match each other and the favourites have pages falling out. My excitement at the realization that I will be able to buy a whole set of fresh, matching Lord Peter books, all the same size and with harmonious covers, is probably way out of proportion to what normal people might feel, but it's there and I felt I had to share it.

I got "Whose Body?" and "Clouds of Witness" last night, as those were the two currently available in my local branch of Chapters. Tingling with excitement to get the rest as they're available.

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

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Hugal
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I am working my way through the Jason Bourne books. Nearly finished book five. The series has more reboots than a broken PC but am enjoying them.

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I have never done this trick in these trousers before.

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ArachnidinElmet
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quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
My Sayers collection is a ragtag assemblage of cheap mass-market paperbacks bought at secondhand stores, with some books missing altogether because I either borrowed them from the library or downloaded them as e-books. None of the physical books match each other and the favourites have pages falling out. My excitement at the realization that I will be able to buy a whole set of fresh, matching Lord Peter books, all the same size and with harmonious covers, is probably way out of proportion to what normal people might feel, but it's there and I felt I had to share it.

Perfectly understandable. I hate, hate, hate it when series are different editions and especially sizes, and have bought replacements (second-hand) when necessary.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Nicolemr
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I just finished rereading The Face in the Frost by John Bellairs. Lovely whimsical fantasy book, with shivery, horror-filled sections, and a satisfying happy ending.

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On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

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venbede
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I’ve just finished and enjoyed Nancy Mitford’s Don’t Tell Allfred. There’s mild fun poked at the French, British and Americans and Nancy’s love of Paris and France is delightfully conveyed.

The book uses many of the characters from her earlier books, The Pursuit of Love and Love in a Cold Climate. But although those two masterpieces have a depth and potential tragedy completely lacking here yet they are far, far funnier.

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Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

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Jemima the 9th
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Finished Love to the Lost (really good and made me cry twice).

Next - on to Archbishop by Michele Guinness. A novel about the first female ABC. It's a hardback tome - feels like I'm reading Jeffrey Archer!

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Brenda Clough
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After a long tough stint on a book jury, I am now reading Razor Girl by Carl Hiassen. He has a winning formula so all his books are exactly similar.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

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Dafyd
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quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
Just finished Watership Down for the third or fourth time. Was struck by the parallels to Lord of the Rings -- especially in the detailed descriptions of the flora. If you hated LotR because he told you all about the trees and shrubs, you won't like WD, which tells you all about the sort of plants that rabbits eat, and don't eat, and avoid, and don't notice.

I don't remember flora descriptions much in LotR. Speculating, rather than opening LotR to look: Maybe it's because the landscape is largely English or British, so when he specifies a tree the native English reader thinks, ok, that kind of landscape, whereas to foreign readers the trees stick out in themselves and have less representative value for landscape?

Watership Down is a book about what rabbits would be like if they could talk and had a culture. So of course they're going to talk about plants because if you're a rabbit plants are important. One of the things Adams pulls off is he tells you about a clever rabbit who figures out that wood floats and you can cross rivers on it, and you think admiringly that, yes, that is a rabbit being clever for a rabbit.

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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Albertus
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quote:
Originally posted by venbede:
I’ve just finished and enjoyed Nancy Mitford’s Don’t Tell Allfred. There’s mild fun poked at the French, British and Americans and Nancy’s love of Paris and France is delightfully conveyed.

The book uses many of the characters from her earlier books, The Pursuit of Love and Love in a Cold Climate. But although those two masterpieces have a depth and potential tragedy completely lacking here yet they are far, far funnier.

Yes, the earlier two are funnier. But DTA has a line which has stuck with me, to the effect that it is only in middle age that you realise what ageing does, because that is when you see people you have known in their prime become old. I think that's very true and very wise: it reflects exactly my experience (I'm 50 next birthday).
The Blessing is her other Anglo-French one: I must read it again soon.

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My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

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L'organist
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I've just about finished reading Beha Ed-Din's Life of Saladin. A fascinating account of the fighting in modern day Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Israel-Palestine, plus earlier battles in Egypt.

Very good on the diplomatic contacts between Crusader knights and kings and the arab commanders.

Not an easy read but well worth the effort IMV.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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mousethief

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quote:
Originally posted by Dafyd:
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
Just finished Watership Down for the third or fourth time. Was struck by the parallels to Lord of the Rings -- especially in the detailed descriptions of the flora. If you hated LotR because he told you all about the trees and shrubs, you won't like WD, which tells you all about the sort of plants that rabbits eat, and don't eat, and avoid, and don't notice.

I don't remember flora descriptions much in LotR. Speculating, rather than opening LotR to look: Maybe it's because the landscape is largely English or British, so when he specifies a tree the native English reader thinks, ok, that kind of landscape, whereas to foreign readers the trees stick out in themselves and have less representative value for landscape?
"Beyond it were slopes covered with sombre trees like dark clouds, but all about them lay a tumbled heathland, grown with ling and broom and cornel, and other shrubs that they did not know. Here and there they saw knots of tall pine-trees."

"All about them were small woods of resinous trees, fir and cedar and cypress, and other kinds unknown in the Shire,... and everywhere was a wealth of sweet-smelling herbs and shrubs.... Here Spring was already busy about them: fronds pierced moss and mould, larches were green-fingered, small flowers were opening in the turf, birds were singing."

These are the kind of passages that drive LotR detractors absolutely nuts.

quote:
Watership Down is a book about what rabbits would be like if they could talk and had a culture. So of course they're going to talk about plants because if you're a rabbit plants are important.
It's not the rabbits that talk about the plants but the narrator.

One of the things that I think Adams does extremely well is the language. I'm not sure anybody has done it better outwith Tolkien. You are learning "lapine" so well and so painlessly that when you get to a point where a rabbit curses blasphemously, you recognize it as such (and as both cursing and blasphemy).

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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Brenda Clough
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And he does it slowly and subtly, over the course of the book. No glossaries, no footnotes, no appendices at the back. That's skill.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

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Golden Key
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L'organist--

quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
I've just about finished reading Beha Ed-Din's Life of Saladin. A fascinating account of the fighting in modern day Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Israel-Palestine, plus earlier battles in Egypt.

Very good on the diplomatic contacts between Crusader knights and kings and the arab commanders.

Not an easy read but well worth the effort IMV.

I know very little about Saladin, except that he was an anti-Crusader, still admired, and there's a mythic/romantic aura about him.

Does the author take a particular view of Saladin, or simply try to tell the story of his life well?

Thanks.

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--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
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Huia
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I am re-reading "the Hitch-Hikers' Guide to the Galaxy" and really enjoying it. I have also discovered that the Library has a copy of the original radio play [Yipee] but I need to learn to play audio downloads on my Tablet first. Thank goodness the Library run free classes for technopeasants.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Dafyd
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quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
quote:
Originally posted by Dafyd:
[QUOTE][qb]Watership Down is a book about what rabbits would be like if they could talk and had a culture. So of course they're going to talk about plants because if you're a rabbit plants are important.

It's not the rabbits that talk about the plants but the narrator.
It is two hundred years since the death of Jane Austen, who invented the free indirect style. (The French and pretentious blokes who think women's writing doesn't matter like to credit Flaubert who wasn't even born.)
The free indirect style is when the narrator writes looking through the eyes of the characters and as far as possible using the characters' thoughts. Hence, the narrator writes about the plants in the landscape because that's what the viewpoint characters notice.

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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Trudy Scrumptious

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I'm just finishing Madeleine Thein's Do Not Say We Having Nothing, about three generations of a Chinese family whose story stretches from the Second World War up to (and beyond) the Tienanmen Square protests of 1989. The bulk of it (and the most emotionally difficult parts to read) takes place during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s. It's always so interesting to read really brilliantly written fiction set in a place and time that I know about, but don't know MUCH about -- it really is like time-travel to imagine what it might have been like for those who lived under that regime. Just a chilling depiction of that particular slice of 20th century totalitarian madness, and depicted with such detail and feeling.

Do Not Say We Have Nothing won BOTH of Canada's two major literary prizes in 2016 and was shortlisted for the Man Booker. I can't always say this about all the books that win or get nominated for big literary awards but any accolades this book gets are SO well-deserved. Completely captivating and heart-wrenching as well as beautifully written.

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

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L'organist
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Golden Key
Beha Ed-Din was a noted Islamic jurist and scholar (some of his books on sharia are still used in madrassas and universities) who achieved such fame that he was sought out by Saladin when he was in his early 40s and asked to take on a role as the equivalent of our Judge Advocate General and Saladin's personal chronicler of events. His writings about Saladin have never been out of publication and are still one of the primary sources recommended to students today, particularly in relation to the third crusade.

Rather than taking a 'view' of Saladin, Beha Ed-Din records things like the siege of Acre and diplomatic contacts between Saladin and Richard I of England ("lionheart") as a contemporaneous eye-witness/participant so it is very much from his own point of view as someone who was an admirer of Saladin. But it is remarkably even-handed (once you have got through some of the flowery verbiage) and of all the arabic accounts is widely regarded as the best; it has to be said that the only equivalent writers on the crusader 'side' are William Tyre a few of the templar knights.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Huia
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I finished Mostly Harmless the final book in the Hitch-Hikers' Guide to the Galaxy Series [Waterworks] . I thought I'd read it before, but I hadn't - loved it.

Huia

[ 13. February 2017, 08:26: Message edited by: Huia ]

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Not Too Bad
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Really enjoying peoples reading matter here. Have challenged myself to read 52 books this year (with a teacher's workload so no mean feat!) so I like to see recommendations.
I'm currently reading The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro and I'm really enjoying the slow sense of mystery that is building. I can see however that it may be a bit ponderous for some.

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Suppose we have only dreamed and made up these things like sun, sky, stars, and moon, and Aslan himself. In that case, it seems to me that the made-up things are a good deal better than the real ones

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Brenda Clough
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I began Hiassen's Razor Girl but his patent schtick is wearing a little thin. So many people of amazing stupidity that you cannot give two straws for! Also it is nearly due at the library.
So I switched over to
Freud's Couch, Scott's Buttocks, Brontë's Grave by Simon Goldhill, which is digressive but intelligent and at least discusses things I need to read about.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

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Sarasa
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News today that Philip Pullman is bringing out an 'equal' series to His Dark Materials, which will be called The Book of Dust . I really loved Northern Lights (The Golden Compass) and The Subtle Knife, but I very nearly threw The Amber Spyglass across the room as to my mind, it seemed more like a New Atheist tract than a novel. I'll give the new series a whirl though.
At the moment I'm reading The Essex Serpent. it's odd how authors alight on similar themes for novels at the same time. it appears to have a lot in common with Frances Hardinge's The Lie Tree which I read last year.

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Previously Gussie.
Newt fancier turned goldfish

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venbede
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quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
I really loved Northern Lights (The Golden Compass) and The Subtle Knife, but I very nearly threw The Amber Spyglass across the room as to my mind, it seemed more like a New Atheist tract than a novel.

I more or less agree. He just doesn't understand the concept of God - if God (the Authority) dies, then surely all existence ceases to be?

And for Christians with a strong view of the Incarnation, God is not primarily the Authority.

Mind you the idea that we are only fully human if we accept our mortality (dust) seems profound to me and not obviously in line with Resurrection hope.

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Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

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Not Too Bad
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Sarasa, what did you think of The Lie Tree? I thought it was superbly written although lacking something at the end.
I agree about the Amber Spy Glass although felt it was poorly written and plotted too which after the sheer perfection of Northern Lights was a bitter disappointment. My daughter loved the Mulafa but I just thought they were a clumsy plot device.

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Suppose we have only dreamed and made up these things like sun, sky, stars, and moon, and Aslan himself. In that case, it seems to me that the made-up things are a good deal better than the real ones

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Doone
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Sarasa, how are you finding The Essex Serpent, please?
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Sarasa
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Doone - After a false start, I'm about a third of the way through The Essex Serpent. The false start was because I knew nothing about it when I started reading and was confused if it was set in the present day, the dark ages or Victorian Britain. When I read up about it and discovered it was a latter I managed to get going with it. As I said it has a lot of similar themes to The Lie Tree, the impact of Darwin, the role of women and how do you treat chidlren that don't quite fit into societies perceived ideas of what a child should be. However, unlike The Lie Tree which was beautifully written and had some great characters, the writting in The Essex Serpent is clunky in places and the characters a bit overdrawn. Still it really hasn't got going yet, so I can't decide if it will be worth it in the end yet.
Not Too Bad - I agree about the plot of The Lie Tree. I really wanetd to love it, but felt I was being hit over the head with a history book at times,.

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Previously Gussie.
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ArachnidinElmet
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I'm reading Naomi Mitchison's The Corn King and the Spring Queen at the moment. It's a huge brick of a book, but pretty quick reading. Loosely fantasy, but more historical fiction, it's set in prehistoric Scythia, inspired by some artefacts in the Hermitage Museum contemporary with ancient greece, but entirely different culturally. There's a genuine feeling of a different time and place; immersive not explanatory. Fascinating stuff.

I read Mitchison's Memoirs of a Spacewoman a couple of years ago after it was mentioned at a SF conference session about solid science writing in Science Fiction books. It's about the life of a xenolinguist (decades before Arrival), where the alien lifeforms aren't just Star Trek-style humans with pointy ears.

It's well worth the effort (and it is an effort) of finding her stuff.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Doone
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Thank you, Sarasa. That bears out most of the, less than glowing, reviews I've read, so I will probably give it a miss.
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Jack the Lass

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I have just finished "Hurrah For Gin" by Katie Kirby, based on her blog of the same name about the trials and tribulations (and joys) of parenting young kids (for people who spot these things on facebook, where there is also a page of the same name, it's the sweary one with all the stick figure drawings). I think it's hilarious and would recommend it to any parents of babies/toddlers/early school age kids. A much better (and infinitely more realistic) read than the perfect little snowflake and fluffy perfection views of many parenting blogs out there.

The only problem has been that I've been reading it whilst enduring a horrible viral cough which has meant that I don't actually dare laugh out loud in case it provokes a coughing fit.

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
wiblog blipfoto blog

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Nicolemr
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Ooh, I read Memoirs of a Space Woman years ago, when I was a teen, and I LOVED it.

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On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

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ArachnidinElmet
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quote:
Originally posted by Nicolemr:
Ooh, I read Memoirs of a Space Woman years ago, when I was a teen, and I LOVED it.

I only came across it a couple of years ago, but seem to be recommending it to a lot of people. Mitchison can fit so much in such a small number of pages. There are no wasted words at all.

After 'The Corn King' I'm going to try and track down a biography. She seems like an interesting person in her own right.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Jemima the 9th
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# 15106

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quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
I have just finished "Hurrah For Gin" by Katie Kirby, based on her blog of the same name about the trials and tribulations (and joys) of parenting young kids (for people who spot these things on facebook, where there is also a page of the same name, it's the sweary one with all the stick figure drawings).

Ooh, I might get that! I see the HFG cartoons on Facebook every so often, and they very often make me laugh and/or wince in recognition.

(Peter & Jane is another good one on the old facebook - it's also sweary and always has a picture of a glass of wine....)

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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I may have made an error. I began In a Dark Wood: What Dante Taught Me About Grief, Healing, and the Mysteries of Love by Joseph Luzzi, and was enthralled. He is a college professor of Italian, and when his pregnant wife dies in an accident leaving him with a newborn daughter his life goes into a tailspin. All very literary and moving.
Then foolishly i went over to Goodreads and had a look at the reviews. Oh dear. Neglecting the newborn, bad. Parking the child with his mother and sisters while he starts dating again, hmm. The reviewers complain that he is something of a louse. (sigh) Do I want to read about this? I should have just discovered this myself.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

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Cottontail

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I started His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet at midnight on Sunday night. This was a mistake, because I read till 2.30am. Then on Monday, I finished it by the afternoon. It came from nowhere to be shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and I can see why. Odd and disturbing and deceptively simple.

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"I don't think you ought to read so much theology," said Lord Peter. "It has a brutalizing influence."

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Hilda of Whitby
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# 7341

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I just bought "Lincoln in the Bardo" by George Saunders. Amazing. It's a novel about the death of Abraham Lincoln's 11 year old son in 1862 and the Greek chorus of dead people in the cemetery who have not yet passed to the other side (this transitional state is the "bardo" in Tibetan Buddhism). From the cover: "Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices--living and dead, historical and invented--to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end?" It is just wonderful--profoundly moving and at times quite funny. This isn't really "a thrilling new form", as Edgar Lee Masters' "A Spoon River Anthology" has a similar structure. But it is a really imaginative historical novel and a tour de force. I'm really glad I bought it.

I also bought "Dorothy Day: the world will be saved by beauty" by Kate Hennessy. Kate is Dorothy Day's granddaughter. It's a joint biography of Dorothy and Dorothy's only daughter Tamar (Kate's mother). It's really compassionate and well-written. I was especially interested in it because of Tamar. The only information I had about Tamar until this book is what Dorothy wrote about her in diaries and letters, and Dorothy's views were not always accurate or fair. I was very glad to learn more about Tamar and what a strong person she was and about her many talents. It was not easy being the daughter of a famous social reformer, as Kate makes clear.

I so rarely buy books anymore that buying two new books is a Big Deal. But these I knew would be ones I would want to keep and re-read.

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"Born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world is mad."

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Helen-Eva
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# 15025

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I'm reading All Out War by Tim Shipman which is the story of the UK EU Exit Referendum campaign last year. It's interesting because it's really close detailed insight into events that are still really recent. Very well written for the speed it must have been done too. Sheds a better light on George Osborne than I've previously encountered but mainly its an impartial-ish account of a truly weird set of events in UK politics.

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I thought the radio 3 announcer said "Weber" but it turned out to be Webern. Story of my life.

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Adeodatus
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I'm reading Wuthering Heights for the first time since school (well, I gave it a go a few years ago and didn't make it past chapter 2, but I don't count that). I swear it's a completely different book to the one we read back then. It's good.

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"What is broken, repair with gold."

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Nicolemr
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# 28

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I'm not reading anything highbrow, I'm reading the Books Ex Libris series of fantasies by Jim C Hines. He invented a type of magic that comes from books, users who are able to pull fictional items out of the books they are written in. It's a lot of fun, and he lists the books he uses as a bibliography in the back of each one. I'm up to the fourth in the series, Revisionary.

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On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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Nicole--

Sounds intriguing! Going on my list.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

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Doone
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Mm, ditto!
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Brenda Clough
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I know Hines and will tell him of your approbation! (Authors are fragile of spirit and need encouragement.)
I just finished reading Into A Dark Wood, which was meh. Broke its back, IMO, by trying to do two things at once that didn't want to blend. Am now picking up Abode of Love, a memoir about the Agapemone sect.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

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Eigon
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# 4917

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I've just been reading Aurora by Kim Stanley Robinson - about a generation ship attempting to colonise a distant star system. As with all KSR stories, the details of how the ship works is scientifically based, but it also has Brexit in Space! At least, it has a crucial decision taken by all the population of the ship in which the voting is very close, and the two sides come to blows. I enjoyed it - and I appreciate the scientific details, but it did take pages and pages to basically say "The ship slowed down".

Now I've just started on The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin. The first part is the set up - how the daughter of a university physicist came to join a secret weapons base in the middle of the Cultural Revolution. The second part jumps forwards a few years, and I'm about to start that. It's very good so far, and Ye Wenjie is a good viewpoint character.

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

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Jane R
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# 331

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Brenda:
quote:
I know Hines and will tell him of your approbation! (Authors are fragile of spirit and need encouragement.)
Tell him of mine as well - I think I posted about the Magic Ex Libris series on the 2016 book thread. I'd love to read more in that series/alternate reality, but the end of the fourth book felt like The End for those characters...

Very refreshing to read a book about a librarian by someone who has obviously worked in a library himself (or is married to/partnered with a librarian?). Yes, we CAN tell the difference.

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