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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017? (Page 4)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017?
Brenda Clough
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Oh yes! I have it downstairs. What I would love to get is a copy of Sandro Boticelli's volume of illustrations for the Comedy. Alas, even used they're expensive.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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venbede
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I have read twice this Lent Rowan William’s Being Disciples, a short book of 70 pages which I cannot recommend too highly. This is about the attitude of a disciple – acceptance of our own muddle, contemplative trust in God and boundless patience with our neighbour.

He deals briefly but profoundly analytically with limitations of the modern mindset (individualism, consumerism and the misplace identification of choice and free dome) but gently without appeal to Authority (which is why conservatives criticise him as a liberal) but against this he does not set human love but an overwhelming sense of the otherness and reality of God (which is why liberals criticise him as a conservative).

I’m convinced.

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Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

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Doone
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quote:
Originally posted by venbede:
I have read twice this Lent Rowan William’s Being Disciples, a short book of 70 pages which I cannot recommend too highly. This is about the attitude of a disciple – acceptance of our own muddle, contemplative trust in God and boundless patience with our neighbour.

He deals briefly but profoundly analytically with limitations of the modern mindset (individualism, consumerism and the misplace identification of choice and free dome) but gently without appeal to Authority (which is why conservatives criticise him as a liberal) but against this he does not set human love but an overwhelming sense of the otherness and reality of God (which is why liberals criticise him as a conservative).

I’m convinced.

Oh, yes! We used the book for our Home Group recently and found it excellent. Not too scholarly, but plenty to get one's teeth into; great for a mixed group of people.
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venbede
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"Wears his scholarship lightly" I think is the phrase.

There is an immense amount of scholarship behind the book (a detail from John of the Cross here, an analysis of post-modernism there) but never showing off.

A wonderful book.

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Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

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Tukai
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"The course of love" by Alain de Botton. A [fictional] story of a supposedly representative romance and subsequent marriage, with the author's "lessons from this" interspersed. Perhaps the truest of the "asides" for me was:

"The Romantic view of marriage stresses the importance of finding the 'right' person,- someone in sympathy with all our interests and values. But there is no such person over the long term...the partner best suited to us is rather the one who can negotiate differences in taste with intelligence and good grace."

Having found such a person, I am still married to her after 40+ years!

Perhaps this quote could be the start of a thread in Heaven!

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A government that panders to the worst instincts of its people degrades the whole country for years to come.

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Sparrow
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quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
quote:
Originally posted by Pomona:
I recently finished The Persian Boy by Mary Renault - there's still the final book in the Alexander trilogy to go, but after reading a lot of books set in classical times recently I feel like something different.


Just my opinion of course, but 'Funeral Games' is MUCH less a book than either The Persian Boy or Fire From Heaven. Somehow after the death of Alexander the magic is gone. It's equally well researched, as one would expect, but still ...

There is also 'The Praise Singer,' classical era but not connected to Alexander. I found it disappointing.

Have you read 'The KIng Must Die' and 'The Bull from the Sea'? TKMD inspired me to travel to Greece and Crete!

I agree - I fell in love with Alexander after reading "The Persian Boy", and the follow up without him seemed meaningless.

And "The King Must Die" - I think my favourite of all her novels. I read it every couple of years, simply magical.

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Brenda Clough
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quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:


And "The King Must Die" - I think my favourite of all her novels. I read it every couple of years, simply magical.

So very true. That was a tour de force, a standing broad jump of worldbuilding that got you actually into the mind of a pagan man who was absolutely true in his faith in his pagan gods.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Golden Key
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Brenda--

quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Oh yes! I have it downstairs. What I would love to get is a copy of Sandro Boticelli's volume of illustrations for the Comedy. Alas, even used they're expensive.

Just out of curiosity, I checked to see if it's available online. The pictures are, in various forms, at places like World of Dante. You can also buy the Botticelli "Inferno" on iTunes for $1.99. (Link is about 2/3 of the way down that linked search page.)

FWIW, YMMV.

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--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

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Welease Woderwick

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I am thoroughly enjoying a reread [however many times I have no idea] of Stella Gibbons Cold Comfort Farm - very funny in a dated sort of way and the protagonist is just so completely unbearable! Lovely writing.

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Jack the Lass

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As part of my Lent reading I am reading a chapter a day from "The Faith Club: A Muslim, A Christian, A Jew: Three Women Search for Understanding" by Ranya Idliby, Suzanne Oliver and Priscilla Warner. After some initial scepticism, I am thoroughly enjoying their debates and wrestling with the similarities and differences between their three faiths.

For something lighter, I've just started L.M. Montgomery's "Anne of Green Gables", which I've never read before, despite being (or at least approaching) ancient. I'm very grateful to Project Gutenberg for giving me the chance to catch up with classics that I probably should have read years ago.

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
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Sarasa
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I love 'Anne of Green Gables', one of my all time favourites. I've always wanted to go to Prince Edward Island to see if it was ever really like it is described in the books.
I donwloaded the Rowan Williams book and am reading it in small chunks. Lots to reflect on, which I geuss is a good idea for Holy Week.

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Brenda Clough
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There is a vast huge tourism industry related to Anne on PEI. The novels are very popular in Japan, and Japanese tour groups throng the place.

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Adeodatus
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I've just started reading Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury. It was recommended to me here ages ago - I think by Doc Tor - but I've only just got a copy. And it is fantastic. A gorgeous, rich, tumbling poem of a story that in the first 30 pages or so has already made me laugh and cry. Thank you, Doc Tor!

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leo
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The Evenings: A Winter’s Tale – Gerard Reve a Dutch best-seller about the boredom of a 23-year-old office worker.

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Nicolemr
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I just finished a teenage fantasy called Three Dark Crowns. It is indeed rather dark. The idea is that on the island where it takes place, a queen always gives birth to triplet girls, who are raised apart, based on their magical attribute. Then at 16 they enter competition with each other, to the death. The survivor will become the new queen, and rule until she fulfills her destiny of birthing triplets. It was excellent, and I'm looking forward to the sequel.

[ 27. April 2017, 17:45: Message edited by: Nicolemr ]

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no prophet's flag is set so...

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
There is a vast huge tourism industry related to Anne on PEI. The novels are very popular in Japan, and Japanese tour groups throng the place.

It's right near PEI National Park. Only one of the many things to see. There's a longstanding musical in Charlottetown. CBC is doing a new series, which I thought was questionable after the wonderful 1980s mini-series. But this one, while faithful to the Anne stories, also paints a much more realistic picture of the times, being adopted as an almost teen.

I am reading "The Bombers and the Bombed" (Richard Overy) which discusses the Allied air war over Germany. Balanced account. The Allies did some pretty bad things, e.g., targetting civilians, which is carefully documented to have preceded The Blitz, i.e., the British bombed civilians first, not the Germans. My interest is because one of four families of my cousins only survived the area bombing of the Rhineland.

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Trudy Scrumptious

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I'm in the midst (well, not quite the midst ... I'm in the first third) of a re-read of Robin Hobb's fifteen fantasy novels known as the Realm of the Elderlings books -- all set in the same world, though she tells several different stories through four trilogies and one tetralogy. The final volume of the latest (and possibly last?) trilogy is coming out next month, and having read the original books over a span of several years I wanted to reread them all in close proximity so I'd have everything fresh in my mind before opening the latest volume. It's quite an epic saga. I don't know why Robin Hobb's work isn't more widely known; I think she's the best author of epic fantasy in the world (though that is clearly JMHO). Anyway, I'm four books into the fifteen-book reread and very much enjoying re-immersing myself in this incredibly complex and thoroughly worked-out fantasy world.

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

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Jane R
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I've just bought the final volume in Marie Brennan's 'Memoirs of Lady Trent' series, which began with 'A Natural History of Dragons'.

If anyone wants me, I will be 'Within the Sanctuary of Wings.'

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Brenda Clough
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Ooh, report back. I read the first volume but was somehow not inspired to go on.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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ArachnidinElmet
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quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
I've just bought the final volume in Marie Brennan's 'Memoirs of Lady Trent' series, which began with 'A Natural History of Dragons'.

If anyone wants me, I will be 'Within the Sanctuary of Wings.'

I keep eyeing up the first volume on bookshop visits. Sooner or later the temptation will be too much; I'm a sucker for a dragon.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Brenda Clough
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I felt (from the first volume) that she was more interested in the anthropology/biology than the plot. But perhaps this totally changed the next few books in?

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Piglet
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Having been battling my way through Devil's Brood by Sharon Kay Penman, a very large (and uncomfortably heavy) tome based on the story of Eleanor of Aquitaine, and rather given up, I decided on something a bit lighter.

So I started re-reading (for the umpteenth time) the Rutshire books by Jilly Cooper. [Hot and Hormonal] And I've just found out that her latest is now available in paperback ...

We all need our little peccadilloes. [Big Grin]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Trudy Scrumptious

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Having been battling my way through Devil's Brood by Sharon Kay Penman, a very large (and uncomfortably heavy) tome based on the story of Eleanor of Aquitaine, and rather given up, I decided on something a bit lighter.


I love Sharon Kay Penman, but I like her earlier works -- The Sunne in Splendour, about Richard III, and the Welsh trilogy that starts with Here Be Dragons, more than her more recent books. She's obviously loved writing about Henry I and Eleanor and their screwed-up offspring, but I've found some of those books to be heavy going too.

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

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Curiosity killed ...

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The latest Jilly Cooper Rutshire novel has caught my eye on the book shop shelves. It would fit into the light reading on the tube I'm currently enjoying, alternating reading the few Heyer books I haven't discovered, rereading those I have and various murder mysteries. I prefer to sublimate my murderous tendencies when frustrated by work.

Currently I'm revisiting Val McDermid after stopping reading her books a few books into the Tony Hill and Carol Jordan series as too harrowing to read, although I want to reread The Wire in the Blood now I know she was inspired to create Jacko Vance after meeting Jimmy Savile. I enjoyed her Kate Brannigan series when I first read them and reading them in order have realised I hadn't read them all the first time. Kate Brannigan is a private eye in Manchester in the 1990s and it is interesting how technology has moved even since then - all films have to be developed in a dark room, mobile phones are new, computer technology is archaic, lots of humour and wise cracking. Her Karen Pirie series has an equally sassy heroine, a police officer who runs the historic cases unit for Police Scotland. The settings, characters and scenarios are fascinating: Skeleton Road (2014) looks back on the Bosnian War, Out of Bounds (2016) has a lot of current and interesting themes.

(This is partly because I'm rationing Ann Cleeves' Vera Stanhope series after devouring the Jimmy Perez books and am enjoying those settings along the Northumbrian coast.)

I have a long commute - 75-90 minutes each way, but it's broken up with changes, so I find anything I have to concentrate too hard on is a bad idea.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Huia
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Thanks for your post CK, you have reminded me of some authors I have enjoyed and want to re-read. Our library system sometimes clears out older works of print books, but is now buying them as ebooks, so I have bought a tablet to keep up. My difficulty is that I forget authors names and am not brilliant at using the filters for searching.

*Your comment re Jacko Vance/Jimmy Saville - I didn't know that, but I have been aware of Val Mc Dermid books having more of a nightmare quality because of the reality behind them. I've found them more difficult to read in the last few years, due in part to the real life stresses of the ongoing quakes, which have meant that my reading has been more comfort or escapist, than previously*.

*It was only as I was writing that last paragraph that I became more fully aware of connection between the real life uncertainty and fear, and my current reading habits. It's amazing what pops up in relation to reading.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Brenda Clough
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When Diana Princess of Wales died my first impulse was to write a letter to Peter Dickinson, and demand another sequel to King and Joker. That was his mystery set in an alternate-England with a slightly different but no less troubled royal family. I felt an overwhelming yearning to read about royals where although there would be angst and misery it would all turn out right in the end.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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ArachnidinElmet
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CK, I don't know if you also follow the Jimmy Perez TV series, but the Shetland Library twitter feed mentions filming is starting on a new series.

Top of my to-read next pile is Val McDermaid's non-fiction book on forensics. I studied a bit of forensic archaeology at University so it's an area of interest. I think there's some history of the science in there as well as more contemporary stuff.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Tukai
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Inspired by the antics of Trump and King Jong Un, I have just re-read "On the Beach" by Nevil Shute. The story is about some people in Melbourne (Australia) and how they react to the deadly cloud of radioactive dust as it spreads slowly southward in the aftermath of an all-out nuclear war, which has wiped out all human life in the northern hemisphere. Not the most cheerful of books but well written.
Hollywood made it into a film, mostly filmed on location in Melbourne. Ava Gardner, one of the stars of the film found Melbourne in the late 1950s to be too dull for her, describing it as "just the right place to make a film about the end of the world"!

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A government that panders to the worst instincts of its people degrades the whole country for years to come.

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leo
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The End of Eddy by Edouard Louis - a boy growing up in extreme poverty near the Somme. Graphic accounts of bullying - autobiographical, written when he was aged 21

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My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

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Brenda Clough
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Just finished Uprooted by Naomi Novik. Excellent, and very like her other work: great worldbuilding, lots of angst and conflict.
I also read A London Home in the 1890s by M. V. Hughes, notable for how hard it is to get a copy in the US. I found it at the big used bookstore in Atlanta, and some day may luck onto the third volume. (Bought the first at Powells in Portland, OR, and lent it to a friend who has vanished with it.)

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Scots lass
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I've just been on holiday with long haul flights, so lots of reading time! The Brother Cadfael books were all 99p each on Kindle so I read the first six of those (I should have bought them all) - I've read them before, but when I was in my teens, so very much enjoyed revisiting them. I also read Caraval, which reminded me of The Night Circus - a fantasy adventure in a game/performance which lasts 5 nights. Rather predictable romance, but very enjoyable.

Started on the plane but not yet finished due to time and jet lag was Rotherweird, which is rather hard to describe. It's fantasy set in a self-governing town, which was cut off in Elizabethan times. There's a mystery aspect, a crime aspect, and some rather weird/entertaining traditions - with a fairly sizeable cast of characters. It's a little confusing, but that might be the jet lag...

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Jane R
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Brenda, re the Memoirs of Lady Trent series:
quote:
I felt (from the first volume) that she was more interested in the anthropology/biology than the plot. But perhaps this totally changed the next few books in?
I think the anthropology/biology IS the plot. I read it for the world-building, mostly; I liked it, but not as much as her Onyx Court series. The ending was quite satisfying, but I can see why you gave up on it... the style is a bit dry, perhaps because she is trying to pastiche genuine Victorian/Edwardian memoirists.
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lily pad
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quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
I love 'Anne of Green Gables', one of my all time favourites. I've always wanted to go to Prince Edward Island to see if it was ever really like it is described in the books.

Come visit anytime. I think it is even better than what is described in the books. [Smile]

I'm listening to the podcast of "One Brother Shy", the latest book by Canadian author, Terry Fallis. Love his work!

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Sloppiness is not caring. Fussiness is caring about the wrong things. With thanks to Adeodatus!

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Brenda Clough
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quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
I think the anthropology/biology IS the plot. I read it for the world-building, mostly; I liked it, but not as much as her Onyx Court series. The ending was quite satisfying, but I can see why you gave up on it... the style is a bit dry, perhaps because she is trying to pastiche genuine Victorian/Edwardian memoirists. [/QB]

Mmm, you gotta do what you gotta do. But the Victorian memoirists are not who I would steal from...

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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ArachnidinElmet
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# 17346

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Just finished Uprooted by Naomi Novik. Excellent, and very like her other work: great worldbuilding, lots of angst and conflict.

Must be something in the air. I'm just reading Tremeraire (aka His Majesty's Dragon) my first Naomi Novik. Greatly enjoying it. She has a lovely lyrical voice; I was sucked in from the first page and just want to keep reading.
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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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The first book is dynamite, excellent. Horatio Hornblower meets the Dragonriders of Pern. The series itself is IMO too long -- at least a couple of the volumes seem to be just wheel-spinning. The last volume however was out last year and I have heard good things of it.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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I've delighted in a rush on reading of late ... some advantages to being unemployed.

The two Rosie novels (Simsion ... 5/5 and 4/5)
Curious Incident ... Dog ... Night Time (Haddon, 3/5)

Beck (Peet/Rossof, 5/5)
All the Light We Cannot See (Doerr, 6/5)
Women in Love (Lawrence, 3.5/10)

Just started Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow

It's wondrously rewarding to lose myself in others' worlds for a while, far away from Facebook and the horrors of a Trumpian world of hate. I'm also trying to write a novel, which I'm sure will never be published, but it's kinda fun.

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shameless self promotion - because I think it's worth it
and mayhap this too: http://broken-moments.blogspot.co.nz/

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Albertus
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# 13356

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
The latest Jilly Cooper Rutshire novel has caught my eye on the book shop shelves.

I liked the story about her intro when she was out & about promoting it: 'Now I'm going to have to disappoint you. On the poster it says
Mount Jilly Cooper but I'm far too old to satisfy you all like that, so you'll just have to be content with forming an orderly queue for me to shake your hands'.

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My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

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Jane R
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# 331

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Just been checking Adrian Tchaikovsky's blog and he is having a competition/giveaway of free audiobooks of Children of Time - which some of you may remember me suggesting for the Ship's book group. SF about an attempt to terraform a planet and create a new intelligent species that does not go according to plan...

I've already got the ebook, so I won't be entering.

[eta] Almost forgot the location of the blog: http://shadowsoftheapt.com/

[ 09. May 2017, 21:37: Message edited by: Jane R ]

Posts: 3771 | From: Jorvik | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
MaryLouise
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# 18697

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Slow autumn reading in the evenings, going on with Henry James. So far, I've read The Aspern Papers, Wings of a Dove and now I'm doing my nth reread of Portrait of a Lady. I don't mind the late James with his labyrinthine sentences, but it is really hard to work out what actually happens (I gave up on that in The Golden Bowl last year). Contemporary fiction is usually so explicit on the what, how and why, but James' oblique hints, evasions and silences is really much more like real life.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Garasu
Shipmate
# 17152

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Just finished Benjamin Alire Saenz's The inexplicable logic of my life

Not life changing, but certainly life-affirming. And I found myself really appreciating a young adult novel where a (straight) boy and a (straight) girl didn't fall in love...

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"Could I believe in the doctrine without believing in the deity?". - Modesitt, L. E., Jr., 1943- Imager.

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Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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I just finished the most recent Chief Inspector Chen novel by Qiu Xiaolong, Shanghai Redemption. In it, Chen has received a "lateral promotion" away from his Chief Inspector duties to a job with a nice title but little actual power. Chen begins to suspect that this was a deliberate move by somebody in authority to prevent him from investigating a politically sensitive matter.

Thank God that could never happen here.

Anyway, Chen's suspicions become certainties when he narrowly avoids being dragged into a scandal. Most of the mystery is spent trying to decide which of the politically sensitive cases that were on his desk before his "promotion" is the one so bad that somebody would go through such measures to take him out. As usual, his investigation makes use of his large circle of friends rather than official channels.

I like the Chen mysteries, although they do tend to be of uneven quality. This is one of the better ones--although the body count is also higher than usual, with at least one person killed simply for helping Chen.

The basic story line is based on a real-life scandal in China, although the author has stated that he toned it down for the book because...well, because nobody would accept in a work of fiction the sort of things that really happened. It would come across as "unrealistically" contrived.

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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Twilight

Puddleglum's sister
# 2832

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Slow autumn reading in the evenings, going on with Henry James. So far, I've read The Aspern Papers, Wings of a Dove and now I'm doing my nth reread of Portrait of a Lady. I don't mind the late James with his labyrinthine sentences, but it is really hard to work out what actually happens (I gave up on that in The Golden Bowl last year). Contemporary fiction is usually so explicit on the what, how and why, but James' oblique hints, evasions and silences is really much more like real life.

I love Henry James's books, but I think I love the film adaptations even more. I thought the The Golden Bowl version with Nick Nolte and Uma Thurman was fabulous.

My book club just read The Last Bus to Wisdom and The Boston Girl. The other women, much nicer than I, loved both, and they were fun, but I found both books rather choppy with a this happened, then this happened, sort of structure.

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venbede
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# 16669

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I've just finished re-reading Alessandro Manzoni’s wonderful novel, The Betrothed (I promessi sposi). I believe Italian school children are put off it due to it reputation as the Great Italian Novel. For me who does not know its reputation, I love it.

It is an historical novel set in the 1620s near Milan. Despite the terrible events as part of the background, (famine, riots, war, plague) there is a strong sense of the human potential to survive and love. They are almost all described as fallible and compromised, but Manzoni gentle irony gives a very endearing glow.

In the contemporary novels of Walter Scott the main characters are gentry or noble and the lower orders provide comic relief. For Manzoni, the principal characters, the betrothed of the title, are prosperous peasants, prevented from marrying at the beginning by the pusillanimity of the parish priest giving into menaces by the thugs of the local nobleman, who has designs of the bride. The nobles and gentry do not come well out of the book.

I found overwhelmingly emotional a scene when another nobleman, who runs a major criminal organisation with his thugs, is disturbed at his guilt and visits the saintly Archbishop of Milan, who welcomes him. Under the bishop’s influence the sinister nobleman repents.

This book deserves to be much better known in the English speaking world.

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Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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A couple of months agoi, I bought the Kindle edition of Mark Colvi's book, Light and Shadows, Memoirs of a Spy's Son. I iften read Kindle books as I eat lunch but had not strted this.

He died last week after many years of ill health which started as he reported the Rwanda atrocities. He was a journalist for the Australian Broadcasting Commission and although brought up in England, he worked for them for many years all over the world.

There is a contrast between the light his reporting shed on world events and the more shadowy existence of his father. His father worked in many embassies around the world but it took years before his son realised that the titles of positions did not seem to have much to do with what his father appeared to do. He was employed by SIS for many years and the tales of that are interesting, although I imagine they have been vetted as his father's memoirs also were.

I promised myself I would read a chapter before bed. Ninety minutes later, I was still reading.

[ 16. May 2017, 02:37: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Eigon
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# 4917

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I've been going for short stories to read in bed before I go to sleep (just one - well, maybe just one more...)
I started with Charles de Lint's Moonlight and Vines, magical stories set in his city of Newford, with ghosts and crow girls and vampires and women who turn into unicorns, all with a wide cast who show up in a variety of stories across the book, and in his novels.
Now I've moved on to Neil Gaiman's Trigger Warning, which has some stories that have been published before, like Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains and The Sleeper and the Spindle, as well as a story about Shadow Moon from American Gods, set in a country pub in the UK, and a lot more which are new to this collection, mostly slightly disturbing (maybe not the best choice for bedtime reading, but still....)

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Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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Having fallen off the sled with this month's SoF book, I have resorted to Dante In Love by A.N. Wilson. Also I have here Option B by Sheryl Sandberg, a book about grieving and loss.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Sarasa
Shipmate
# 12271

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Lily Pad said:
quote:
quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
I love 'Anne of Green Gables', one of my all time favourites. I've always wanted to go to Prince Edward Island to see if it was ever really like it is described in the books.
Come visit anytime. I think it is even better than what is described in the books. [Smile]

With both the weather and politics being so gloomy here at present I'm very tempted to do just that. [Smile]
I've just read Kate 'The Suspicions of Mr Whicher' Summerscale's The Wicked Boy . I do like her investigations into Victorian crime. What made this particularly interesting for me was that my grandmother must have been about the same age as the 'wicked boy' and lived about a mile away at the time. The house the deed was done in is a typical Victoran workers cottage, of which hundred of thousands were being built at the time. I live in a very similar one in a different part of London, so I found the way people actually lived in them interesting too. [Smile]

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Previously Gussie.
Newt fancier turned goldfish

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Nicolemr
Shipmate
# 28

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I just checked out Heartbreak Hotel, the latest Jonathan Kellerman Alex Delaware mystery. I love them, and I can't wait to start this one tonight.

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On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

Posts: 11578 | From: New York City "The City Carries On" | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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Just finished that one. I like them too. When I stumbled across a link for the ebook, I couldn't resist.
(I finally joined the smartphone brigade a couple of months ago. No early adopter here.)

Posts: 4336 | From: Bay Area, Calif | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged



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