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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017? (Page 7)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017?
la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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I’ve just finished ploughing through Simon Sebag Montefiore’s history of the Romanovs. It’s a rather weighty tome, but highly readable in style. I’m now off to read something a bit lighter, but after that I think I’m going to come back for his biography of Stalin.

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

Posts: 3544 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
ArachnidinElmet
Shipmate
# 17346

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quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I'm really struggling with The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy. Not that I'm not enjoying it, but it is a hard read for me. The combination of it being set in a culture I'm not familiar with, which not only adds a whole lot of new detail but means that names are harder to keep track of, with the fact that it's fairly postmodern in style and structure (definitely not a single, linear storyline with a clear main character, by any means), has me reading it in very small doses and wondering if I'll get it finished before the library due date.

I had the same problem with The God of Small Things. I didn't not enjoy it, but it took years to finish half a dozen pages at a time. A strange phenomenon.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

Posts: 1805 | From: the rhubarb triangle | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Jane R
Shipmate
# 331

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<seizes tone of conversation and drags it by main force down to a less rarefied level>

I've just read 'The Empty Grave', the last book in the Lockwood & Co series by Jonathan Stroud. Well up to the standard of the previous volumes and a satisfying conclusion to the series.

Posts: 3831 | From: Jorvik | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Ooh! Strou's Bartimaeus trilogy was the literary equivalent of crack cocaine. Is this new one also fantasy, for the YA reader?

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5269 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
ArachnidinElmet
Shipmate
# 17346

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quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
<seizes tone of conversation and drags it by main force down to a less rarefied level>

Well, if we're doing that, I have to admit enjoying 50 Shades of Mr Darcy by William Codpiece Thwackery (actually by the people that brought us Bored of the Rings). I bought it for a friend (no, really) but got sucked in, as it were. Supremely silly, with mentions of Catherine de Burgh's late husband, Chris and the Reverend Collins former career as lead singer of Genesis. Not likely to win any awards, but it passed the time pleasantly.
Posts: 1805 | From: the rhubarb triangle | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Jane R
Shipmate
# 331

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@ Brenda: It's the last volume in a five-book series about an alternate Britain where ghosts are real, common and deadly and the only people (relatively) safe at night are children, who can see and/or hear them clearly and are therefore able to fight them. The first book in the series is 'The Screaming Staircase'. And yes, YA urban fantasy.

Very well-written and quite gripping. Only now I want to reread the entire series and Other Half has gone off with my Kindle...

[ 14. September 2017, 22:07: Message edited by: Jane R ]

Posts: 3831 | From: Jorvik | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Scots lass
Shipmate
# 2699

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quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
<seizes tone of conversation and drags it by main force down to a less rarefied level>

I've just read 'The Empty Grave', the last book in the Lockwood & Co series by Jonathan Stroud. Well up to the standard of the previous volumes and a satisfying conclusion to the series.

I did a re-read of the previous four last month, in preparation for this one! I'm first in line for the library copy and impatiently drumming my fingers on the desk waiting for it to arrive. Very pleased to hear it's up to scratch. *checks library account yet again*
Posts: 858 | From: the diaspora | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
# 5647

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quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I'm really struggling with The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy. Not that I'm not enjoying it, but it is a hard read for me. The combination of it being set in a culture I'm not familiar with, which not only adds a whole lot of new detail but means that names are harder to keep track of, with the fact that it's fairly postmodern in style and structure (definitely not a single, linear storyline with a clear main character, by any means), has me reading it in very small doses and wondering if I'll get it finished before the library due date.

I had the same problem with The God of Small Things. I didn't not enjoy it, but it took years to finish half a dozen pages at a time. A strange phenomenon.
I finished. It was beautiful, although I still feel like I didn't understand more than about 1/4 of it. Some of the scenes at the end were surprisingly moving for a novel in which I couldn't keep track of who the characters were half the time. I did learn a lot about the subculture of hijras (m-to-f trans people) in India, which I knew nothing about before reading this novel. I should have learned a lot about the politics of Kasmir, but was too confused a lot of the time to take it in.

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

Posts: 7330 | From: Closer to Paris than I am to Vancouver | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
leo
Shipmate
# 1458

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Saints, Sacrilege and Sedition: Religion and Conflict in the Tudor Reformations – Eamon Duffy I am bored with all this 500 years since the Reformation stuff. I don’t see schism as something to celebrate.

This book shows how indoctrinated many protestants have been.

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My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

Posts: 22956 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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Two new books from the library. Give a Girl a Knife by Amy Thielen is the well regarded chef's memoir of getting into the restaurant business in NYC but longing to return to her Upper Midwestern roots. ( Spoiler alert: She does go back.) My other book, The Dawn of Christianity By Robert Knapp, comes highly recommended.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6228 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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A quick, enjoyable read: 'The Drowned Boy' by Karin Fossum. I wouldn't normally want to read a tragedy about a drowned boy, but this book promised an investigation into the psychological state of the mother, which did interest me. And the unexpected (to me at any rate) ending made me laugh out loud - a delight at the end of a book with such a gloomy title.

There was even a short foray into theological views about God and life after death, which should please shipmates: 'I've never really been the type for absolute certainty. And anyway, doubt makes us human'.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

Posts: 34559 | From: Cream Tealand | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged



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