homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools


Post new thread  Post a reply
My profile login | Register | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017? (Page 8)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: Lost in a Good Book: What are you reading in 2017?
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Sorry, it's writer-speak. Get out your ruler. A mass market paperback is the small format book. An old format these days, like this one. About 4 1/2 by 7 inches, they were originally designed to be carried in your pocket and were heavily marketed to the troops during WW2. In the day you could buy one for less than a dollar.
To a great extent the mass market PB has been superseded by the trade paper book. This is still paper backed but bigger, about 8 or 9 by 5 or 6. This is a more convenient paper trim for the printer, looks more impressive on the shelf, and is the favorite resort of literary fiction and self-publication. Because of the bigger size you can charge more, sometimes a lot more -- $12-15 is not unusual.
The hardback book is of course in hard covers. The standard size (maybe 6 by 9) is close to that of the trade paper book (and is why the trade paper is cheaper to produce). This is the preferred edition for libraries, because they last longer, but they cost more and so it's harder to sell them to regular people.
Coffee-table books or other large formats are more rare and always expensive.

[ 17. October 2017, 13:38: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5678 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
# 5647

 - Posted      Profile for Trudy Scrumptious   Author's homepage   Email Trudy Scrumptious   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I have a strong preference for trade paperback as the best format to read a paper book in -- mass-market paperbacks feel too cheap and hardcovers are too bulky and heavy. Mass-market paperbacks, as well as being smaller, are usually also printed on cheaper quality paper. They are still the standard format for romance novels and a lot of other genre fiction.

This is standard North American publishing stuff ... of course it may be done differently in other countries. But over here the usual three formats are, as Brenda says, mass-market paperback, trade paperback, and hardcover. Very few books (classics mostly) would be available in all three formats. Most would appear first in hardcover and then in one of the two paperback formats, or, if it's a smaller press or a less-known author, the book might be released only in paperback -- again, either mass-market or trade, but never both.

--------------------
Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

Posts: 7360 | From: Closer to Paris than I am to Vancouver | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Dafyd
Shipmate
# 5549

 - Posted      Profile for Dafyd   Email Dafyd   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I suspect from Brenda's description that the trade paperback format is much rarer in Britain. Most paperback books in Britain are smaller than hardbacks.
I do remember that in the late eighties a certain best-selling fantasy author (David Eddings) used to have his books come out in the UK first in hardback, then in what was called trade paperback, and then in normal paperback size. The trade paperback was about the size of a hardback, and looked ungainly compared to all the other paperbacks on the UK shelves (and was priced in between the two other formats). We assumed it was a device to make more money.

--------------------
we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

Posts: 10376 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Oh, the order and type of publication is famously convolute.
A further refinement, which is probably only American, is the concept of returns. Back when the MMPB first appeared, the publisher (Pocket Books, I believe) wanted them to be carried everywhere. Not just bookstores, but drugstores, grocery stores, everywhere. Because drugstores had never done this they were kind of shy. And so the concept of returns was born. Order in a load of mass market paperbacks; you are allowed to return the ones that don't sell. No risk to you! Naturally everyone piled on board and mass market paperbacks dominated the market for the latter half of the 20th century.
This was in many ways annoying for the publisher and the author; you didn't know whether the book would make any money for months, possibly years, as the returns came trickling back.
But trade paperbacks do not come under this rubric. You cannot return trade paper; if the store orders them in they have to pay for them and if they don't sell, tough. This is why, on the discount cart, you always see trade paperbacks and hardbacks but never MMPBs.
And this is why publishers would far rather print hardbacks or trade paperbacks. Not only can they charge more, but all the aggravation and bookkeeping revolving around returns is avoided.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5678 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Jane R
Shipmate
# 331

 - Posted      Profile for Jane R   Email Jane R   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Trade paperbacks are becoming more common in genre fiction, especially science fiction and fantasy. They're usually printed on the same size paper as the hardback (if any), so the whole thing doesn't have to be re-typeset. Some publishers issue books in trade paperback and e-book formats only, or release a trade paperback instead of a hardback and (some months later) follow it up with a smaller paperback (what the Americans call mass-market paperback).

I rather fancy the idea of being able to buy the ebook and a physical copy in one package, but nobody's offering that at the moment...

Posts: 3934 | From: Jorvik | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
There was a golden moment at the beginning of the ebook revolution, when Baen Books published Lois McMaster Bujold's Cryoburn complete with a disc in the back that had all the previous Miles Vorkosigan novels on it. -Well- worth the money.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5678 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
ArachnidinElmet
Shipmate
# 17346

 - Posted      Profile for ArachnidinElmet   Email ArachnidinElmet   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I prefer a smaller paperback myself for ease of use, but I'll take anything except trying to shelve mismatched sizes in a single series. Aargh, infuriating.

--------------------
'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

Posts: 1829 | From: the rhubarb triangle | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Sipech
Shipmate
# 16870

 - Posted      Profile for Sipech   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
If a certain internet-based book retailer named after a South American river fulfills their promise, I should take delivery tomorrow of La Belle Sauvage: The Book of Dust (volume 1).

Been looking forward to this since it was announced. And I've timed the rest of my book reading such that I've just finished two other works in time.

--------------------
I try to be self-deprecating; I'm just not very good at it.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheAlethiophile

Posts: 3708 | From: On the corporate ladder | Registered: Jan 2012  |  IP: Logged
Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

 - Posted      Profile for Eigon   Author's homepage   Email Eigon   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I'd heard good things about the St Mary's series by Jodi Taylor - a group of time travelling historians sounded like just my cup of tea.
The first book is Just One Damned Thing After Another, and sets up the St Mary's Institute of Historical Research (which is just slightly in our future) with a group of new recruits, including the POV character Madeleine Maxwell.
The missions they go on are dangerous, and there are other time travellers, doing it for profit rather than research, as the villains of the piece.
It wasn't quite as light hearted as I'd expected from the reviews, but the characters are interesting, and I do like the relationship between Maxwell and the Chief Technician, Leon Farrell, so I'll probably look out for more - there are 7 in the series so far.

--------------------
Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

Posts: 3698 | From: Hay-on-Wye, town of books | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
M.
Ship's Spare Part
# 3291

 - Posted      Profile for M.   Email M.   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I mentioned 'One DamnedThing After Another' a while back, in the summer, I think.

I liked the title and the premise but actually wasn't very impressed and wouldn't bother with the others. She has quite a following, though, it seems.

M.

Posts: 2255 | From: Lurking in Surrey | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm reading Midnight in America, a book about the dreams that people dreamed during the American Civil War. The author mines journals and letters of the period. Fascinating, to dip into so many psyches, but also a bit dull. (A -lot- of people dreamed about their spouses.)

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5678 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

 - Posted      Profile for LutheranChik   Author's homepage   Email LutheranChik   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
If I thought Neil deGrasse Tyson was going to be a smooth read, like Carl Sagan's or Lewis Thomas' books for laypeople...nope; ten pages in and a few seconds after the Big Bang, and I'm drowning in a sea of photons and bossons and positrons. But I will not be daunted!

Meanwhile, just ordered Africa: A Biography from the library. My grasp of African history, especially precolonial, is almost nil, and the dearth of African histories out there gives me a clue why.

A question: Is anyone/has anyone here ever tried to follow a Great Books reading list? I know there are several variations floating about, some more multicultural thlan others. I start and stop with mine, and have given up the idea of reading the books in historical sequence.

--------------------
Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6331 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Net Spinster
Shipmate
# 16058

 - Posted      Profile for Net Spinster   Email Net Spinster   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
There was a golden moment at the beginning of the ebook revolution, when Baen Books published Lois McMaster Bujold's Cryoburn complete with a disc in the back that had all the previous Miles Vorkosigan novels on it. -Well- worth the money.

Except Memory. BTW a new Penric novella should be coming out next month. That will shoot to the top of my reading list when it comes out.

I'm currently reading a Woman in White by Wilkie Collins.

--------------------
spinner of webs

Posts: 1083 | From: San Francisco Bay area | Registered: Dec 2010  |  IP: Logged
Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

 - Posted      Profile for Eigon   Author's homepage   Email Eigon   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
M., looking at the reviews on Goodreads, the St Mary's series seems to be one of those love 'em or hate 'em ones - 5 stars or 2 with little in between. If I do stick with it, it'll be because I like Farrell, Max's love interest.

--------------------
Never cruel nor cowardly.
Never give up, never give in.
The Doctor's Promise

Posts: 3698 | From: Hay-on-Wye, town of books | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Net Spinster:
Except Memory. BTW a new Penric novella should be coming out next month. That will shoot to the top of my reading list when it comes out.

I'm currently reading a Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. [/QB]

I read the first Penric, but would rather have them all in a lump. However, ought I to complain of serialization? I have written a sequel to TWIW, and it's coming out, in serial naturally, next year.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5678 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

 - Posted      Profile for LutheranChik   Author's homepage   Email LutheranChik   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Just got Robert Knapp's Invisible Romans from the library.

--------------------
Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6331 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Jane R
Shipmate
# 331

 - Posted      Profile for Jane R   Email Jane R   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Brenda:
quote:
I read the first Penric, but would rather have them all in a lump.
I don't care as long as she keeps them coming - I really like that series. I'd quite like some more about the characters from Curse of Chalion/Paladin of Souls, but I suppose she's said all she wants to say about them.

Just finished The Brightest Fell, latest in Seanan McGuire's October Daye series. I liked it, but anyone starting the series on book 11 would have been rather lost - it was a gallop through a lot of things that had been set up in previous books and you need to have read all of them first to understand what's going on.

Posts: 3934 | From: Jorvik | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
TurquoiseTastic

Fish of a different color
# 8978

 - Posted      Profile for TurquoiseTastic   Email TurquoiseTastic   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Recently finished The Samurai by Endo, a book that had been on my shelf for years but which I had not summoned the initiative to tackle. Downbeat but interesting. It is apparently based on a true story (though filled in speculatively, of course).

Of the two central characters who narrate the story, the Franciscan missionary comes over as an extremely unattractive character, albeit with one or two partially redeeming features. The samurai himself is much more sympathetic if unrelentingly doleful. But then that is the point, I suppose. Endo sees Jesus as primarily the "man of sorrows" who identifies with the wretched. In this and, importantly, in no other way at all, the samurai forms a link with him.

Posts: 1081 | From: Hants., UK | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tukai
Shipmate
# 12960

 - Posted      Profile for Tukai   Email Tukai   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
"trade books" means non-fiction aimed at the general reader - as distinct from textbooks or professional reference books.

I think they are called 'trade" because they are sold through general booksellers, i.e. the book trade, as distinct from through schools or specialist outlets.

--------------------
A government that panders to the worst instincts of its people degrades the whole country for years to come.

Posts: 573 | From: Oz | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Not a phrase used in the UK - we just call them "non-fiction". If there is such a term, it would be used to denote books aimed at people who ply a particular trade, e.g. for plumbers or electricians or gardeners.
Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
SvitlanaV2
Shipmate
# 16967

 - Posted      Profile for SvitlanaV2   Email SvitlanaV2   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:

A question: Is anyone/has anyone here ever tried to follow a Great Books reading list? I know there are several variations floating about, some more multicultural thlan others. I start and stop with mine, and have given up the idea of reading the books in historical sequence.

Quite a long time ago I tried to read through the Waterstones 100 books of the 20th c.

I did quite well, but had other things to read and do, so didn't get to the end. I didn't read the books in the order that they are in the list.

Of course, some books appealed to me more than others, but I wouldn't disagree with their inclusion. The main problem with the list is that, like many such lists, it's skewed towards Anglophone literature. The dominance of fiction over non-fiction is tolerable to me, but some people would complain about that.

Posts: 6427 | From: UK | Registered: Feb 2012  |  IP: Logged
venbede
Shipmate
# 16669

 - Posted      Profile for venbede   Email venbede   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm re-reading Colette's Claudine at School. Sapphic oh la la.

I've just finished Dostoevsky's Demons for the umpteenth time, this time in the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation.

--------------------
Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

Posts: 3180 | From: An historic market town nestling in the folds of Surrey's rolling North Downs, | Registered: Sep 2011  |  IP: Logged
Jemima the 9th
Shipmate
# 15106

 - Posted      Profile for Jemima the 9th     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Just finished Finding God in the Waves by Mike McHargue (known as Science Mike to his podcast listeners). Southern Baptist deacon loses his faith, remains undercover in the church for a couple of years as an atheist, leaves the church, then has a mystical encounter with God on the beach, and puts together a new faith (with a far lower bar for belief, possibly one of the reasons I love the book so much). It's a lovely book, I want to buy a copy for everyone I know.

Now on to Sepulchre by Kate Mosse. I read Labyrinth on holiday a couple of years ago, and loved it. Big, slightly silly, much impending DOOM, and this time with the promise of ghosts, doomed love and duels. I cant wait.

Posts: 774 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Thanks, Jemima. I have just ordered a copy to give one of my daughters for Christmas.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20205 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
wild haggis
Shipmate
# 15555

 - Posted      Profile for wild haggis         Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Just started reading Ali Smith's "Autumn." At the beginning I wondered where it was going. But it is fantastic. Her use of language and imagery is superb.

Anyone else read/reading it?

--------------------
wild haggis

Posts: 108 | From: Cardiff | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Jemima the 9th
Shipmate
# 15106

 - Posted      Profile for Jemima the 9th     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
You're welcome, Moo. I really hope your daughter enjoys the book.
Posts: 774 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Nicolemr
Shipmate
# 28

 - Posted      Profile for Nicolemr   Author's homepage   Email Nicolemr   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I just finished reading a fantasy series by P C Hodgell, the Kencyrath books. They have a really interesting premise, and I love the main character, a young woman named Jame, who is a potential avatar of the Destruction aspect of her people's 3-faced God. There are eight books so far. The author writes very slowly, so although she is working on the next, I suspect I have a few years to wait. [Frown]

--------------------
On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

Posts: 11663 | From: New York City "The City Carries On" | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
leo
Shipmate
# 1458

 - Posted      Profile for leo   Author's homepage   Email leo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
The BISHOP’S BROTHELS Prostitution in Southwark was largely run by the church - and the reformation didn't change anything.

--------------------
My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

Posts: 23064 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tukai
Shipmate
# 12960

 - Posted      Profile for Tukai   Email Tukai   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
"The body floated face down in the murky waters of the canal."

How's that for a great opening line for a murder mystery set in Venice? It comes from Death in a strange country by Donna Leon, which is one of a series featuring Commissario Brunetti. As a whole the series features fine writing, interesting characters (not least Brunetti, his literary wife, and his children who age as the series goes on). In this particular story, like many of the others, the murder conceals murky doings by Italian businessmen and politicians.

--------------------
A government that panders to the worst instincts of its people degrades the whole country for years to come.

Posts: 573 | From: Oz | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I've just finished the fourth in Eva Dolan's series set in Peterborough and starring DI Zigic and DC Ferreira of the Hate Crime unit, Watch Her Disappear. This murder victim is a transgender woman, so lots of information about that scene. Sadly, from the way it finishes, I suspect it's the last in the series; it has been fascinating, not a series I can read back to back, because the settings are so harrowing, but definitely with a finger on the pulse of current issues.

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13552 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I've just finished the fourth in Eva Dolan's series set in Peterborough .... not a series I can read back to back, because the settings are so harrowing...

Yes, well, if you will read books set in Peterborough, what do you expect? [Biased]

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 
 
Post new thread  Post a reply Close thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
Check out Reform magazine
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
  ship of fools