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Source: (consider it) Thread: Oh, how beautiful - the garden thread
RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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"Gardens are not made by singing 'Oh, how beautiful,' and sitting in the shade." -- Rudyard Kipling

After years of languishing on the waiting list, I will be taking over a 10'x10' organic garden plot in March. I had no idea I'd get such a large plot; the ones at my church are 3'x6'. So I hadn't dreamed beyond tomatoes and basil. I will put plenty of tomatoes and herbs! But now I'm starting to daydream about whole salad bowls of my own produce.

Anyone else making spring garden plans?

Posts: 24153 | From: La La Land | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
"Gardens are not made by singing 'Oh, how beautiful,' and sitting in the shade." -- Rudyard Kipling

Unfortunately!
I am currently suffering with aches and pains in shoulders, hands, back & hips after too much garden preparation (erecting raised beds, and starting to fill them with a mixture of last years potting compost, sieved soil and bagsof fresh compost) The joints & muscles were painful enough to keep me awake last night, but easier today. Luckily we have a few days of high winds and lower temperature to make me stay indoors recuperating.

I am enjoying seeing the spring flowers I brought here from my old garden coming into bloom. They sat in crowded pots, neglected, for a year before being planted last autumn, so I'm really pleased at how well they are doing - Unlike the bulbs I bough locally (and expensively) and planted at the same time, they are showing very little inclination to peep above the ground.

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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Ruth--

Congrats! [Smile]

FYI: Be mindful of group politics and dynamics in a community garden. I had a plot, long ago. Lots of "big frog in a small pond" stuff; a coup; people staying trying to stay under the radar of the big frogs; bullying several people who didn't quite fit, taking things (trees, plants, artwork) from their plots, and driving them out. Seriously. And I've heard of that elsewhere, too.

I don't want to spoil your mood and experience; but I figure if you know what might happen, you can watch out for it.

Best of luck!

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

Posts: 16758 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Be mindful of group politics and dynamics in a community garden. I had a plot, long ago. Lots of "big frog in a small pond" stuff; a coup; people staying trying to stay under the radar of the big frogs; bullying several people who didn't quite fit, taking things (trees, plants, artwork) from their plots, and driving them out. Seriously. And I've heard of that elsewhere, too.
So "You're closer to God's heart in a garden than in any place on earth"? Sounds just like most churches! [Devil]
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Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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In Heidelberg, where my son lives - most people live in flats. So they buy gardens on the outskirts of the city, a pleasant cycle ride away. They own the plots which are various sizes, the average being about 30 metres by 60 meters. Some rent them too. They have electricity and water and can build sheds, greenhouses etc. They each have boar and rabbit-proof fencing as it's very near the forest. Some have bigger plots with polly tunnels and small market gardens, often growing veggies, sunflowers etc. It's great to see the bikes with food and wine in their baskets heading for their gardens. They get lovely weather in the summer too - I couldn't be more jealous!

People often have BBQs and parties in the summer in their gardens, they have all sorts of artwork on their gates to identify their gardens for visitors.

My MIL left all her money to my sons ( [Roll Eyes] ) and he has saved his to spend his a garden.

Beautiful and civilised!

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Garden. Room. Walk

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betjemaniac
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# 17618

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at this time of year I'm still just sticking my head out occasionally to make sure the garden's still there! Mind you I did hack back the last of the buddleia the other week, at the cost of near frostbite.

However, March is rolling round - I need to sort out the raised beds ready for the next round of potatoes, tomatoes, etc, I've got a green beans wigwam that needs a bit of TLC, and a patch of the lawn wants re-seeding. My lawn runs along the edge of a field, which is then clear of buildings for about 5 miles. There's no fence, just a 2.5 foot drop from the field down into my garden. Unfortunately during the growing season this requires constant vigilance to remove unwelcome blown-in interloper seeds. Particularly when the barley's full grown.

It ends up taking over my life!

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And is it true? For if it is....

Posts: 1153 | From: behind the dreaming spires | Registered: Mar 2013  |  IP: Logged
Tree Bee

Ship's tiller girl
# 4033

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I've placed my regular order of yellow courgette plants and climbing French bean plants.
I know it's cheaper to buy the seeds but apart from windowsills I don't have the space to raise them.
Also ordered basil and parsley plants and nicotiana flowers.
So looking forward to the warmer weather!

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"Any fool can make something complicated. It takes a genius to make it simple."
— Woody Guthrie
http://saysaysay54.wordpress.com

Posts: 5180 | From: me to you. | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Chamois
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# 16204

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I've bought my seed potatoes. Unfortunately none of the garden centres near here is stocking Pentland Crown this year. In fact the selection of main crop potatoes is woeful.

Memo to self - order online next January.

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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We have had a record-breaking mild winter, scarcely any snow at all. And so my hope is that this year my fig tree will not have died right down to the ground. And if this is so, then there is, at last, some hope that I may get a fig from it! Every year I have muttered the relevant text from the Gospels to it, and if this year it is fruitless it is going to go. Because I can't imagine that we could get better conditions.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

Posts: 4235 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
cattyish

Wuss in Boots
# 7829

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It's deeply muddy out there. I have gone out and done my daily digging. My wellies (actually Mr C's Christmas present from his Mum, but he wasn't home) are now dripping in the garage. I want my plastic tent style greenhouse up and securely pegged this month so I can plant beans.

Mr C has started threatening to do landscaping, but thankfully his actions are lagging behind his words. I don't want him to build permanent raised beds and pave bits until I've decided where I want them.

Last year I got pitifully little in the way of tomatoes. This year I'm more prepared with a heater to use if the temperature keep dropping at night into May as it did last year.

Cattyish, dreaming of broccoli.

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...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived, this is to have succeeded.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Posts: 1770 | From: Scotland | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by cattyish:

Mr C has started threatening to do landscaping, but thankfully his actions are lagging behind his words. I don't want him to build permanent raised beds and pave bits until I've decided where I want them..

Oh, they will do that, won't they!!
I had intended to get the house sorted last summer, and plan the garden during the winter, but Mr lil just couldn't leave it alone, so I've had to keep rushing out to the garden to save the things I expect to use and to keep ahead of his need to rid the garden of everything but grass.

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Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
Ruth--

Congrats! [Smile]

FYI: Be mindful of group politics and dynamics in a community garden. I had a plot, long ago. Lots of "big frog in a small pond" stuff; a coup; people staying trying to stay under the radar of the big frogs; bullying several people who didn't quite fit, taking things (trees, plants, artwork) from their plots, and driving them out. Seriously. And I've heard of that elsewhere, too.

Just like a church, then, huh? [Biased]

I had a small plot some years ago at my church, and I gave it up because the soil was chock full of nutgrass and because someone kept watering my tomatoes. I'd go over after work and find that someone had watered my plot since the last time I'd been there, but of course I couldn't tell when exactly or how much water had been run. The irregular watering did my tomatoes no good, and I spent the whole summer doing little but weeding. [Mad]

Posts: 24153 | From: La La Land | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
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# 1468

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Ruth--

Yup, re church. [Biased] I'd been thinking that, too, but I wasn't sure what *your* church was like.

Maybe try mulch or ground cover, this time?

--------------------
Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

Posts: 16758 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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It's been a busy weekend - somewhat enforced by upcoming family woe, sadly.

This weekend I have:

Laid a cotoneaster hedge - not well, but given, my lack of experience and the dodgy starting material, it will have to do.

Bought and planted a medlar tree (a tree! Our first tree! I've wanted a medlar for years and never had a garden to put it in!

Repotted a bunch of stuff (technical term, that)

and just generally got stuff done in the garden. I now have even more concrete and rubble to shift that was piled under the hedge but hey, it'll get done.

Now I just need to sleep and ache...

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

Posts: 3487 | From: The wardrobe of my soul | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged
cattyish

Wuss in Boots
# 7829

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The plastic tent greenhouse is up, solidly tethered to the wooden fence. Mr C hasn't been out there, so I'm safe from unwelcome interference for now.

The perennial things and bulbs are doing their thing and the grass/ moss/ odd reed clump which passes for a lawn is looking pleasantly green. I've paused- muddy and breathless- to drink tea out there. It helps me think about where I'd like seating, paths and those pesky raised beds which are to be foisted on me.

While I dig all sorts of feathered carnivores are flitting around, hopping in to my freshly-dug patches for worms. There seem to be plenty of worms; I can't put a spade in without a casualty. How to Budhists manage to dig?

When Mr C and I are in the house together next (might be Thursday) I have drawings to show him and oath ideas from Monty Don's book to bed his ear with.

Cattyish, working (sort of) until 10.

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...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived, this is to have succeeded.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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quote:
Originally posted by cattyish:

While I dig all sorts of feathered carnivores are flitting around, hopping in to my freshly-dug patches for worms. There seem to be plenty of worms; I can't put a spade in without a casualty. How to Budhists manage to dig?

I was always taught that when you cut an earthworm in half it forms two earthworms, rather than killing it. If a bird comes along to eat it, of course, that's the end of it -- but hardly your fault.

quote:
When Mr C and I are in the house together next (might be Thursday) I have drawings to show him and oath ideas from Monty Don's book to bed his ear with.


I really don't think I want to know how you "bed his ear." Sounds a bit kinky to me.

[Biased]

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"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

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Graven Image
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# 8755

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I started gardening in one square foot plots in my long rectangular garden last year. It worked pretty well as I have some medical problems which make it hard for me to bend over and get up and down. The result was pleasing. I can handle one or two square feet at a time with a fair amount of ease. Weed a foot square plot to day, mulch a square foot tomorrow, and on and on. I know it is early but have been pulling weeds while the ground is wet. Happy to discover parsley, one onion plant and artichoke squares have wintered over. I planted two squares of spring peas. Taking a chance I am as we had light snow yesterday but I think they should make it.

[ 06. March 2017, 20:33: Message edited by: Graven Image ]

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Notice to police, Should my body ever be found on a jogging trail, know that I was murdered elsewhere and my body dumped there."

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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We've been in our new home for a year now so I decided I ought to take some photos of how the garden is looking in our first spring.

We were too busy with the house last spring (and the garden was covered with gardening 'stuff' we brought with us that wouldn't fit into the garage or shed).
Then once the summer started Mr meg was so keen to get working on clearing the garden that I never had the chance to take "before" photos.
Now I have it on record in it's current state, which is a mixture of what was already here (mostly Spanish bluebell and three-cornered leek, and a weedy lawn dotted with sweet violets), things I planted in the autumn, and the part-prepared beds and planters for veggies - which I need to get on with as I have seedlings coming up to planting size.

So I then put more compost & sieved soil into one of the raised beds. It's a slow process as I have a bad back and can only do a little at a time, but I'm hoping that the summer photographs will show at least one of them full of beans and leeks..

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I have managed to get out into the garden today and prepared one of the raised beds, which last year was host to a tangle of grasses with underground stems and ground elder. The ground elder had somehow got there from next door despite there being several metres of uncompromising clay with no sign of the stuff between the fence and the bed. I very much doubt if I have got all the threads out. I topped it with compost from one of last years potato bags, treated it with growmore and lime, and planted out some brassicas. It was supposed to be peas last year, but I only got a couple of pods. Then I topped it with plastic netting as I have a posse of woodpigeons who like pecking anything to death (I hope the tulip poisoned them) and absolutely delight in brassicas. I was pleased to see a nice fat worm.

I forgot to put the daggy sheep pellets round them to keep the slugs at bay.

[ 19. March 2017, 19:10: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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Given the time constraints on me now, I have a nasty feeling that I may well have to put at least part of a plot on the allotments under black plastic for the year. Alhough the secretary knows me and knows why, and is quite happy to arrange for it to be done, it still goes against the grain.

In other news, I think I have finally stopped stuffing stuff into the newly laid hedge to make it more interesting - thus far in addition to cotoneaster it has a red hazel, a spindle, a dog rose and two currant plants. All in about eight yards of hedge.

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

Posts: 3487 | From: The wardrobe of my soul | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
"Gardens are not made by singing 'Oh, how beautiful,' and sitting in the shade." -- Rudyard Kipling

Adam was a gardener and God, who made him, sees that half a proper gardener's work is done upon his knees (also from "The Glory of The Garden" by Rudyard Kipling)
Again, unfortunately, as my back is not at all happy with the amount of time I've spent on my knees weeding the garden this past week. Sadly, years of neglect following the death of the previous gardener here has resulted in well established perennial weeds, so it's going to be a long job.

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Talk about books -any books- on our rejuvenatedforum http://www.bookgrouponline.com/index.php?

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Penny S
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# 14768

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We read that poem at my mother's funeral (her choice). I am letting her down in my garden.
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