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Source: (consider it) Thread: Oh, how beautiful - the garden thread
Brenda Clough
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Yes, it's always easier not to fight your local conditions. I once planted potatoes and they all fell prey to disease in perhaps ten minutes. OTOH pumpkins around here grow like monsters -- mine were volunteers (how was I to know the seeds had not composted from last fall?) and the plants surged over the planting bed, completely inundated the sidewalk, and were proposing to completely block off the garage. People would stop on the street and goggle at the ocean of vegetation swamping my yard, and I got 5 or 6 pumpkins.

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Lamb Chopped
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Hee hee. How true--though I hope not, really, because I've planted potatoes this year, and we got FIFTY pumpkins off the vines two years ago. They were rare for this country, some kind of Vietnamese weird pumpkin, expensive and highly prized. There were crows of delight when Mr. Lamb loaded up the back end of the car with them and handed out the lot at church and work.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
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Sandemaniac
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After all the recent upheavals, I'm trying to catch up with stuff. Slowly getting the allotment back under control, though not being about to water has meant that a lot of stuff has struggled - we will be buying onions all winter for starters. I've also sown various stuff right at the end of its sowing time (and later... optimist!), and hopefully it's just had enough rain to get it all germinating.

Not all is rosy - not a female flower on the squashes yet, for example, but it's improving.

On the home front, we are finding out how shite some of the soil is in the back garden - holes filled with used potting compost are all very well, but they dry out faster than a celebrity at Betty Ford - and how much effing bindweed there is still buried in the soil.

On the other hand I am slowly getting an idea of what can go where, and will be moving stuff around in the winter. For starters a small suburban garden doesn't need two rhubarb plants, luckily the Knotweed's brother has moved to a rhubarbless house, so one will go. The hanging basket at the front door looks lovely, and we picked the year's first tomatoes today.

Now if I can just get he time and money to shift the ten-feet-tall Lleylandii hedge, the concrete, and replace the somewhat rotten shed, I'll be laughing....

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Yes, it's always easier not to fight your local conditions.

It's going to take me a while to adjust to local conditions. Have had 30+ years gardening on heavy clay - difficult, but when it rained the ground stayed wet for several days - and at least it was fertile.
Am now on some sandy stuff that dries out in no time, especially as it is also windy (salty wind) and this garden has no shade from the hot sun we've had this year. All the veg are struggling - and it's not just the soil conditions, but we have a new range of pests & weeds to deal with.
The clematis that I love, and brought with me, don't like the wind, and some are looking very sad. It will take me some time to give up on them - am wondering if it's worth trying to give them a "Chelses Chop" next year, to keep there heads below the wind. Probably not.
May have to resort to growing a garden full of erigeron (fleabane), that seems to do very well here.
[Roll Eyes]

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Brenda Clough
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My clematis caught a disease and died, all at once. I cut it off at ground level. Either it'll come back, or not.

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cattyish

Wuss in Boots
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My garden can kill mint. I've now got some local mint which is growing itself satisfactorily in the soil but bought mint dies. I've no idea why, and neither do more experienced gardeners.
Cattyish, off to find wild food.

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...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived, this is to have succeeded.
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Penny S
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My garden, Clay-with-Flints, loves mint, and the two plants (my grandad's) which had struggled so badly in the last place (chalky hill-creep) went mad. They are now in pots. That might work with bought mint, too.
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Roseofsharon
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I was wary of mint in our old location. as it has a reputation for spreading everywhere. Tried it in a pot, but it died - apparently it doesn't like being confined.. I have some in a pot here, and just divided & repotted a bit last autumn. took some time to show it's face this year, though. I did stick a few bits in the waste ground over our wall, and it seemed to be doing OK - but I think someone else has found it, as it seems to have been harvested. If growing in a pot in an an area it likes, don't stand it on the soil, otherwise it escapes through the drainage holes.
I thought French Tarragon was difficult to grow, but it behaves like mint here, and I daren't let it out into the garden.

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wild haggis
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Mint: try a bigger pot. You need to keep taking out the tips. If it flowers and seeds it will die. In one garden I had mint in a big pot sunk into the soil. Worked well.
In this garden I have it in a medium pot. Mind you the slugs got it and horror of horrors I had to put down some pellets. Since then it has been fine. Tastes good. Not enough for mint tea mind you!

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wild haggis

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Brenda Clough
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Gloomily contemplated the front yard today, which has been neglected the entire summer. I prudently plant perennials which can, mostly, hold their own, but there are areas which are solidly weeds. The most painfully evident spot is right by the road, in full sun. Clearly something must be done. What should I plant in this spot, that would be sturdy and pretty but not too tall? (The last major addition to my garden, a fig tree, is now taller than I am but nary a fig do I get. I am going to go out and read Mark 11:12 to it.)

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Penny S
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I surveyed my garden and spotted that the weed of the location was geranium - mostly Herb Robert, but other wild relatives. So I planted proper geraniums.

Do not follow this plan when identifying your weeds. I am now eradicating proper geraniums.

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Penny S
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And I have just eaten the first blackberry of the year, from a plant that hasn't read the the books about primocanes and bearing on side growths in the second year. I had to cut right down this year because of my neighbour having his fence replaced, and to move the cable TV duct from running through the middle of the plant, and did not expect fruit, but it has borne, and melt in the mouth berries. I offered one to my guest, but she fears the pips.
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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I surveyed my garden and spotted that the weed of the location was geranium - mostly Herb Robert, but other wild relatives. So I planted proper geraniums.

Do not follow this plan when identifying your weeds. I am now eradicating proper geraniums.

I was once flabbergasted by the sight of Herb Robert for sale in a garden centre, it was a pretty rampant weed in my old garden. I like species geraniums so, on the basis that they would be at home in my garden, planted several varieties. Oh boy, were they at home! I spent hours each spring/ summer thereafter pulling up the invading runners & seedlings.
There were ash trees in neighbouring gardens, so we also had hundreds of ash seedlings coming up each year, and if you missed one in some dark corner it would be head hight by the end of the summer, and a small tree by the next spring. And people go out and buy them from garden centres!

I have a raspberry that is as confused as your blackberry. I planted a dozen autumn fruiting raspberry canes this spring .One of them, just the one, insisted on flowering, even though I tried to dissuade it, and has been fruiting for a couple of weeks.

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Sandemaniac
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First bloom on our Nellie Moser this evening! Only a little one - well, it's only been in three months - but it's a bloom!

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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wild haggis
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I'm keeping an eye on the brambles (blackberries to all Sassanchs)at the top of our road beside the roundabout. They should be ready for picking next week.

Yummy apple and bramble pie.
And the brambles will cost nothing - free food!

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wild haggis

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cattyish

Wuss in Boots
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The potato plants got blight. Booo! I lifted them all and the potatoes themselves are fine, yay! I had the ones which were about 1/2" in diameter for lunch.

There are now flowers on the pumpkin plants so you never know.

Mr C has had a crisis of confidence about building the greenhouse base so I'm tempted to crack on and do it myself to save his angst.

My carrots are lovely and much less humorous than I had anticipated in our stony soil. The onions are coming on.

Cattyish, warm.

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Penny S
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My second picking of blackberries have let me down. The plant has clearly got hold of Dorothy Hartley's "Food in England", in which she explains that only the first fruit to ripen, at the tip, as sweet, and the later fruits are tart. This has never been true before. I have praised this plant to the hills for being able to be eaten with cream and no sugar, and my teeth were set on edge. Bah.

And Rose, my village has the dreaded ash word in its name, and the seedlings have a dreadful habit of popping up in disguise until they are too far gone for total eradication. My neighbour has allowed two in her garden, and though she decapitates the regularly, using my long arm pruner, I fear for the foundations.

[ 30. July 2017, 20:34: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Penny S
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Went for courgettes, found a marrow!

Saw a woodmouse while working on stain removal on D's clothes.

[ 06. August 2017, 13:10: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Went for courgettes, found a marrow!

That's happened to me a few times this year - shouldn't have packed so many plants in one bed - there are so many leaves I can't see the courgettes that are hiding underneath.

My garden is a bit of a disaster Partly this is because of the weather here, which, at least this year, has been blazing sun for days on end, then a day of torrential rain followed by three days of strong, blustery, salty wind. Not helped by me forgetting how soon after rain I need to water this very free draining sandy soil.

In my last, clayey, garden a day of rain like we had here recently would have got me out of watering for over a week - but not watering for three days here has almost killed my outdoor cucumbers. The container-grown beans and raspberries look pretty sad, a tub of love-in-a-mist has scorched in the salty wind, as have the leaves on the topmost branches of the forsythia.
I'm feeling a bit despondent .

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M.
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I think I posted earlier in the year that we were getting our raspberries and autumn raspberries at the same time. Well, we are now getting a second crop of autumn raspberries, and they are huge - between an inch and an inch and a half long.

'.....never seen one as big as that before!'*

Anyway, it feels like a real unexpected treat.

M.

*yes, I know that's about a marrow....which the courgettes seem to be turning into.

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Roseofsharon
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My garden had an horrendous infestation of aphid earlier in the year, starting with a few on the clematis, then really smothering the broad beans, pretty well ruining the crop - from which it moved on to devastate the nearby runner beans, and to a lesser extent my other climbing beans.
Once the broad beans were cleared from the bed the aphids around the rest of the garden gradually disappeared - and now, in late August, my runner beans have put on loads of new growth, are flowering and producing beans [Yipee]

I am hoping for a long mild autumn to keep them producing, as I have really missed having runner beans to eat this summer.

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Posts: 3048 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged



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