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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Favorite obscure sect name (Page 3)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Favorite obscure sect name
sabine
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# 3861

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Missed edit window and wanted to add that I mention the Disciples only as historical interest. I'm not trying to connect them directly to the People's Temple tragedy.

sabine

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"Hunger looks like the man that hunger is killing." Eduardo Galeano

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Augustine the Aleut
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# 1472

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
When did Hebrew become an area of study in seminaries, does anyone recall off the top of their head? All Hebrew names seem to be simply nouns repurposed.

*Really Obscure Topic Tangent Alert*

Hebrew names are verbs repurposed, it being a verb-based language, as was pounded into my head for several years.

While there were mediaeval hebraists, Hebrew really started on its university roll from the renaissance at the same time as the revival of Greek studies and the early translations of the Bible. Henry VIII established regius professorships at Oxford and Cambridge in the 1540s. The real impetus was on the Reformed and Lutheran territories on the continent as well as in Scotland-- where the study of biblical Hebrew still has a powerful presence in universities and seminaries. Spanish and Italian universities started off the renaissance with strong scholarship in Hebrew, but it seems to have quickly become suspect as an inclination. Pope Leo X (1513-21) was knowledgeable and promoted scholarship in the field but one was more likely to climb the ranks with a degree in canon law than a knowledge of Nehemiah. I gather that Pius XI was the last hebraist to occupy the papacy but I am open to correction.

Most of my Lutheran and Presbyterian clerical acquaintances faced Hebrew as a compulsory seminary topic (the requirement seems to have softened in recent years) but Canadian and US Anglicans have fallen down badly in comparison. I do not know if there are more than 2 priests of the Diocese of Ottawa who could construe a psalm if it meant their life (and one is a former Lutheran minister). Only one of my friends currently in Anglican seminaries is studying biblical Hebrew and is viewed as an eccentric for doing so. A quick telephone call to some UCC acquaintances suggest that about 15% of Ottawa-area clergy have studied biblical Hebrew and some can hold their own respectably. I have one contact who is a Wheaton grad and quite enjoyed her Hebrew classes, but she is the sort with a selection of Akkadian and Syriac fonts on her computer and maintains an Aramaic FB page.

Posts: 6033 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Penny S
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# 14768

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quote:
Originally posted by Callan:
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
'Strict and Peculiar' reminds me of 'Strict and Particular', as in (some) Baptists, so it's quite realistic.

IIRC, one of Ruth Rendell's novels (not one of the Inspector Wexford stories) features two barking-mad members of 'The Epiphany People'.

IJ

I remember coming across a Strict Baptist Chapel in Brighton which I thought was rather impressive. Brighton isn't the obvious place to set up shop for that sort of thing.

I read a book, as a child, which suggested that John George Haigh, the notorious acid bath murderer was brought up as a member of the Peculiar People, but the interwebs indicate that he was raised as Plymouth Brethren. As was Aleister Crowley. Someone ought to do a survey of the childhood religious allegiances of the various Bad Guys of history (not counting the ones whose membership of that particular fraternity was the cause of their sundry crimes).

Lots of people lived in Brighton who were not the sort of people who people think live in Brighton. People whose near ancestors lived in the Sussex villages, full of tin chapels, come into town to work in the bigger houses, and on the railways, and in the factories. Just look at all the terraces. I'm not in the least surprised at Strict Baptists.
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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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Thank you, AA. Now I cannot remember why I wanted to know, but it will come to me.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer

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goat
Apprentice
# 18740

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Bishops Finger wrote :


[Confused]

[Help]

IJ
There is obscurity in the British Christian monarch claiming connection with Solomon of Israel . Jesus finished up cooking fish for the disciples on a beach at Galilee.
confused

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Uriel
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# 2248

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Here in Somerset we had the Agapemonites from the mid 19th to mid 20th Century. They were also known as the Community of the Son of Man, but Agapemonites was from the greek for "Abode of Love", or Agapemone, which was their name for their chapel/house in the village of Spaxton.
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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
I forget -- what was their core doctrine? WAs it simply that David Korean was God?

Actually, their leader was Cyrus Teed. I think you might be thinking of David Koresh who took the name Koresh for the same reason Cyrus Teed did, it being the Persian name for Cyrus. (Cyrus the Great was apparently considered a messiah, which was why Koresh wanted that name.)

The Koreshans had very strange beliefs...a bizarre form of hollow earth theory, (if you put a rod perpendicularly in the ground, a line proceeding at right angles from the top will eventually intersect with the earth, depending on the length of the rod.)

They also believed in reincarnation and immortality. That didn't work very well for them, did it?

For more laughs, you can check the interwebz here and here.

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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Welcome aboard, goat!

Not sure how much Her Majesty would appreciate being likened to an obscure sect, though, hence the confusion....

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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goat
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# 18740

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Knights of the Garter walk in procession to St George the dragon catcher who protects virgins. He has a goat-headed lion on the roof of the catholic, apostolic faith of Jerusalem and Italy.
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Enoch
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# 14322

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
This is the article about the current Agapemone legal settlement. I am startled to learn that the cult only allowed the patriarch (and his preferred 'soul bride') to procreate. Were there really that many rich women who would sign on for this with 'Beloved'? Handing over their entire fortune, remember. I can only conclude that he must have been dynamite between the sheets, so that current satisfactions completely made up for the lack of a future.

From the Devon Live article

"The Charity Commissioners will now distribute the windfall amongst other good causes which, in their view, most closely resemble the Agapemonites."

That's what's called cy-près. It's a long standing principle of charity law. But the mind boggles as to what other good causes can be found that closely resemble the Agapemonites.

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Brexit wrexit - Sir Graham Watson

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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Quite. Should be fun looking for them, though.

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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HCH
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# 14313

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In "Bedazzled" (1967), we meet the order of St. Beryl, "the leaping Beryllians".
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