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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Songs that irritate. (Page 3)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Songs that irritate.
wild haggis
Apprentice
# 15555

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Grammar in poetry is flexible, so doesn't bother me in lyrics.

"Jerusalem": eeeeeeeekkkkkkkk. I'm tempted to "Sing Flower of Scotland"! "Jerusalem" ain't British. I know what I would do with the burning arrows!

Now you don't want to see Songs of Fellowship or Mission Praise music books: I write some very rude comments at lyrics that aren't poetry, good theology or are just plain stupid -"feeling your kiss" can't remember which song but isn't that a bit weird when taking about God?

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wild haggis

Posts: 42 | From: Cardiff | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by aizen:
You know those Aqua songs? The irritate me to no end. I am just glad that I barely hear them on the radio anymore, and even happier that they did not get out of the 90's. Lol.

Be thankful you don't have my shuffle! They're there! Mainly because I think they were great satirical fun.

But as a hardcore Dylanfreak (or so I pretend) I find the final line of one of the songs people see as amazing blah blah blah to be a bloody throwaway ... after wondrous hints of biblical precedents he ends up "hanging in the balance of the reality of man / like every sparrow falling like every grain of sand." I get the biblical and Blakean number-crunching, but what is 'the balance of the reality of man" (he has never got inclusive language, ever ) [Disappointed] ... if humanity or a person's life balances only when invaded by, say, divine love, sure, but the phrasing doesn't bear the weight of that analysis.

A reality, balancing? State by step on a piece of string, maybe.

I honestly think His Bobness was taking the piss on that one, even though it was 1980 and he had Jessusy stuff coming out of every ori ... um, pore.

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shameless self promotion - because I think it's worth it
and mayhap this too: http://broken-moments.blogspot.co.nz/

Posts: 18635 | From: scarily close to 40° | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
quote:
Originally posted by Felafool:
My teeth curl at the opening bars of that pompous, nationalistic, jingoistic, yet over-popular so called hymn, Jerusalem.

'And did those feet.........?'

No!

I know it has been used that way, rather like Bush used "Born in the USA", and we sang it that way at school.
But on reflection it seems to me that expected answer is "No!". Jerusalem has not been built, rather the dark satanic mills have been built and we have yet to build Jerusalem.
It is a call to action, not a basking in self-righteousness.

Yeah, this has always bothered me. The poem is a commentary on Jingoism. "Aren't we, as a nation, singularly blessed by God?" Well, no! That's the point. Jerusalem wasn't built in England. The questions in the first verse are rhetorical.

Then the second verse goes on to say: despite that, despite the fact that we're no more special than anyone else, I'll do my bit to make my country worthy of such things. It's not saying that it already is, it's saying we should strive to make it become so.

Posts: 2360 | From: Coventry | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Alex Cockell

Ship’s penguin
# 7487

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Frankly the whole of All kinds of everything sets my teeth on edge, but especially
quote:
Seagulls and aeroplanes
Things of the sky
Winds that go howlin'
Breezes that sigh

'Things of the sky'? What the hell is that all about? Clouds, rainbows, smog?

Grrr

Not "Typhoons, Huwwicanes, Earthquakes! SMOG!"?
Posts: 2110 | From: Reading, Berkshire UK | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
VirginiaKneeling
Apprentice
# 18414

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I loved the parody of "I the Lord of Sea and Sky" because I frankly can't stand that song (I refuse to call it a hymn because it ISN'T!). Only now the next time it pops up in church I will be overcome with giggles....

I recently heard the "Lecha Dodi", the Jewish welcome to the Sabbath Bride, sing to the tune of Cohen's "Hallelujah". I think Leonard would have liked that. "Lecha Dodi" has no prescribed tune, but has been sung to a thousand different ones in as many places, so why not?

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Inasmuch as ye have done it to one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me..

Posts: 11 | From: Virginia, USA | Registered: May 2015  |  IP: Logged
Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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This is probably unfair since it's a folk song probably two centuries old in its oldest forms and there isn't just one composer responsible however...I love the tune of "Oh Shenandoah" but the words are irritating. Who or what is Shenandoah in the song? Sometimes it seems to be a river, a Native American chief, or the chief's daughter. [Confused]

I think I'll just stick to instrumentals of the song.

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

Posts: 21194 | From: CA | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
This is probably unfair since it's a folk song probably two centuries old in its oldest forms and there isn't just one composer responsible however...I love the tune of "Oh Shenandoah" but the words are irritating. Who or what is Shenandoah in the song? Sometimes it seems to be a river, a Native American chief, or the chief's daughter. [Confused]

I think I'll just stick to instrumentals of the song.

I think it refers to the chief. The river in question is the Missouri.
Posts: 2360 | From: Coventry | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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Having prepared program notes for my choral group's performance* of Shenandoah, I can tell you that there are almost as many opinions as to the meaning of the lyrics as there are versions of the lyrics.

Some musicologists do think that Shenandoah was an Algonquian Indian chief whose daughter was wooed by a river boatman, but others (more sensibly, in my opinion) take the word at its face value: the name of the river that runs through the Virginias into the Potomac.

But what of “the wide Missouri,” whose source is in Montana? The song was well known to trappers, fur traders and boatmen on the Missouri River in the early nineteenth century – lonely men who found themselves far from home. The words paint a vivid picture of the boatman’s longing to see the “smiling valley” that he hasn’t seen for “seven long years” as he is “bound away across the wide Missouri.”

So there's little reason to regard the song as anything but nostalgia for home. "I love your daughter" could refer to the hills, the forests, the meadows that make up the Shenandoah valley.

* Extra credit for whoever can spot me in the video. Hint: I'm not "the guy with the hair" in the back row, right side, but close.

[ 06. July 2017, 19:08: Message edited by: Amanda B. Reckondwythe ]

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

Posts: 10059 | From: The Great Southwest | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Some songs have a perverse sense of humour. I was making breakfast at some unheard of hour of just after five on a cold winter morning. One degree. I was up early as smoke alarm and fire door inspection starts early here today. Annual, compulsory inspection. I was woken by arthritis aches here there and everywhere so got up very early.

As I stood at coffee machin making my first cup, I stopped to listen to what was going through my brain non stop

Arise and shine for thy light has come... I did not even have the next part about the glory of the Lord. Just a bit of sarcasm.

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Posts: 9073 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
cattyish

Wuss in Boots
# 7829

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
Having prepared program notes for my choral group's performance* of Shenandoah, I can tell you that there are almost as many opinions as to the meaning of the lyrics as there are versions of the lyrics.
<snip>

* Extra credit for whoever can spot me in the video. Hint: I'm not "the guy with the hair" in the back row, right side, but close.

That's a lovely arrangement Amanda B. Reckondwythe. Are you not conducting?

Cattyish, off to wash chairs for the local Choral.

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...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived, this is to have succeeded.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Posts: 1785 | From: Scotland | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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No. Our conductor has even less hair than I do! (He tells us that our singing makes it fall out.)

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

Posts: 10059 | From: The Great Southwest | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged



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