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Source: (consider it) Thread: potätö_potahtö
Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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You say potätö I say potahtö
(if I've got my umlaut use right!)

I don't I hasten to add normally read a thing called The Mirror but it came up on my feed while I was awaiting my morning latte (flat white, actually, but that's an OZ/NZ thing I believe), and raised an interesting analysis. It was an extended version of a regular chestnut, "words the royals don't say." Meh. But it raised interesting possibilities shipboard, with pond, ditch, hemisphere and heaven knows what other differences.

The terms in question are below. This could be in The Circus I guess, but I actually don't want a game, just illustration of our diffe4nt thought spaces. I've put in both what I grew up with and what I now use, because that too has changed.

So ...

  • Pardon / sorry ... I was brought up with, strictly, "I beg your pardon", but would now say "sorry?"
  • Toilet / lavatory / loo / dunny ... I was never allowed to say "toilet," and was supposed to say "lavatory", but avoided it. "Loo" became the noun of choice, though from secondary school on the antipodean "dunny" took over (and verbs, often, rather than nouns: bog/shit, piss etc)
  • Perfume / scent ... I've always said perfume (emphasis slightly on first syllable
  • Tea (the meal) / supper / dinner ... I was brought up with supper but used "dinner" since school days. I realize that often denotes the main meal but IME that has generally been evening (except, traditionally, on a Sunday, but that has died out these days).
  • Lounge / Living room. I was brought up lounge but defected to living room.
  • Posh (pronounced with a short "o") ... these days I'd say snobby ... or, pösh facetiously
  • Portions / servings / helpings ... I've only used "portions" in a strict dietician context, but would float with the other two
  • Patio / terrace / verandah ... to me they're different things, but more often than not verandah for a larger area wrapping around a larger part of the building, ground level; patio for a small intrusion from building to garden, terrace perhaps if up above the ground floor ...
  • Function / do / party ... context specific. I'd use "do" facetiously for a snobby do.
  • Sweet / pudding / dessert I was brought up with "pudding" but would now tend to say "dessert."
  • Refreshments / “food and drink” ... either/or
  • “It was Nice to See You” ... apparently once Her Lizziness™ says that one does not add further discourse. "C U L8R is not permitted.
  • "Cheers" apparently the royals will always issue a formal toast. I tend to use a mock phrase "Bottoms up ..."
  • Serviette / napkin ... I was brought up with "napkin" but tend these days to say "serviette."
  • “Mum and Dad” (It's only recently I've realized USAians spell "mum" "mom" as a matter of course ... The Mirror got that wrong. To my embarrassment I was brought up supposedly saying "mother" / "father" but avoiding ever saying it. My kids were supposed to call me dad (and their mums "mum"). Ironically they call me "father"! [Killing me]
  • Fanny pack / bum bag ... oh, my. Do NOT say "fanny pack" in NZ/OZ.
  • bachelorette / hen’s night/do ... Hen's night or do ... what is a bachelorette?
  • Backhoe / digger ... either/or where I live. A backhoe tends to be smaller.
  • Condo / flat / apartment I tend to think of a condominium as a multi million dollar apartment in an exclusive tower block. A Ditch difference here is that a flat can mean either a "unit" (which we tend to say in NZ) or a shared house or unit, complete with the verb "flatting," usually housing young people. In OZ shared accommodation tends to be a "sharehouse." Apartment works here as something perhaps more upmarket than a unit and less so than a condo.
  • Cooties / lurgy .. cooties I think is rarely hear except maybe in the jocular phrase "girl/boy-cooties" when sharing a drink or spoon or something. But "lurgy" is a cold or a flu.
  • Drug store / chemist / pharmacist ... I've never heard "drug store" outside the USA ... either of the others suffice in NZ/OZ, I think
  • Fries / chips ... it's changing in NZ, but was always "chips" when I was growing up. "Fries" cam,e when Maccas came, part of the Americanization of the antipodes. Now it tends to be "chips" in a fish and chip shop, fries most other places - similar in NZ and OZ I think.
  • chips / crisps ... funnily enough, as a UK kid I knew the things in packets, crisp and cold, as "crisps," but that world has only crept into NZ in recent years.
  • Garbage / rubbish / trash ... always rubbish when I was growing up, therefore a rubbish truck. I was mildly puzzled by Oscar's trash can. Garbage possibly a touch more in OZ? The vehicle collecting it is a rubbish truck in NZ. The receptacle is a bin, not a can, here.
  • Hard Candy / boiled sweets / lollies ... when I was recently publishing a book I had to ask US friends what the words would be there. NZ is probably idiosyncratic, for it uses "lollies." In UK I would have used "sweets." Not sure about OZ (and anyway there are state differences on many of these things, there). I never knew "candy" was a thing until I asked, except for candy canes.
  • Mail Carrier / postie ... If I used the first at all it would be to describe a vehicle (truck/lorry/juggernaut) ... we have posties, though they are rapidly dying out [Tear] .
  • pantyhose / tights ... I never realized they were the same thing!
  • realtor / real estate agent ... I only heard the former for the first time quite recently
  • stool pigeon / grass ... I seriously thought the former was encrustations of pigeon shit! [Hot and Hormonal]
  • undershirt / vest / singlet ... always the last of these in NZ ... I would have called it a "vest" as a UK kid. Not sure about in OZ. But in OZ a "vest" is what I would call a "waistcoat" ... and/or a sleeveless pullover.
  • jersey / jumper / pullover / sweater ... oh heavens! I grew up with jerseys, but when I moved to Melbourne (where they're sometimes called a guernsey, particularly in the sports context) I was told a jersey is a cow. But so is a guernsey, and in any case each is an island! [Ultra confused] I grew up with pullover or jersey ... now just settle for pullover. And as winter is coming I need several, and combinations thereof.

So ... ymmv?

--------------------
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and mayhap this too: http://broken-moments.blogspot.co.nz/

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lilBuddha
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# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
(flat white, actually, but that's an OZ/NZ thing I believe),

Love these, better than a cappuccino or latte, they have spread up to the right side of the equator.
You can get these anywhere that has a descent barista, though you may need to explain what it is. The important thing is the milk. It is in equal portion to the espresso and is stretched folded and tapped to get more microfoam. The espresso should be a ristretto shot, but that isn't as necessary.

Apologies, carry on.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
the right side of the equator

[Disappointed]

--------------------
shameless self promotion - because I think it's worth it
and mayhap this too: http://broken-moments.blogspot.co.nz/

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Originally posted by Zappa:

quote:
jersey / jumper / pullover / sweater ... oh heavens! I grew up with jerseys, but when I moved to Melbourne (where they're sometimes called a guernsey, particularly in the sports context) I was told a jersey is a cow. But so is a guernsey, and in any case each is an island! [Ultra confused] I grew up with pullover or jersey ... now just settle for pullover. And as winter is coming I need several, and combinations thereof.
I'd say jumper, but I'd also call a knitted jumper a gansey. Which sounds similar to guernsey, but doesn't, as far as I know, have anything to do with the island. "Gansey" and "guernsay" are obviously connected, but how?

[ 17. May 2017, 06:02: Message edited by: North East Quine ]

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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It sounds as if a Gansey is the same as a Guernsey, they are both fishermen's sweaters. The crucial thing is to know how they are knitted - the main sections of Guernseys are knitted " as one" on a circular needle, not made of bits sewn together like lesser garments.

In Guernsey itself each parish had its own style of sweater, allegedly to help identify drowned fishermen who were washed up on shore.

[ 17. May 2017, 06:36: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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mr cheesy
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# 3330

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I think a lot of these things are about context. We've consciously taught our kid that there are some things you say in the house, there are other things you might say with your friends and others that you say to or in front of old people - and we've got to learn to moderate our speech depending on who it is we're talking to.

So we have developed several different vocabularies that are not necessarily overlapping.

We commonly just say "eh?" to each other. Or if we're being sarcastic "excuse me?".

And we usually have our main meal in the evening, which is "dinner" - whereas if we're with older relatives it is "tea"

Toilet is acceptable, but it is a loo or other euphemism in polite company.

"Dad, you are a complete arse" is a common greeting here, whereas a whithering look is the polite alternative..

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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A guernsey is a specific form of a jumper - it's knitted in the round, waxed wool, traditionally navy blue and has various patterns across the shoulders/round the neck. It is designed to allow fishermen to be hooked out of the water without the sweater falling to bits or coming off them.

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L'organist
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# 17338

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Woollen upper garment without buttons at the front is a pullover; sweater is just about acceptable.

Same thing in (usually marled) cotton jersey is a sweatshirt

The room where you sit is either sitting room or drawing room, never a lounge - that is something in an airport or an hotel.

Pardon/ sorry: if for use when you haven't heard the word if what; if used when getting to seat mid-row in a theatre just say thank you to those who aid your progress. Sorry is only for when you seek to make amends for something.

Always napkin - a serviette is the papery abomination issued by fast-food outlets. If forced to use disposable items for a party at home (never 'do' or 'function') then the term is paper napkin.

Grandmother/Granny/Grandma are OK: nanny is either a goat or a professional nursery-nurse; and Nana is a large dog in Peter Pan.

I too was brought up with either Mama and Papa or Mother and Father; our own children used Mummy and Daddy when small and Ma and Pa when older.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Originally posted by Zappa:

quote:
jersey / jumper / pullover / sweater ... oh heavens! I grew up with jerseys, but when I moved to Melbourne (where they're sometimes called a guernsey, particularly in the sports context) I was told a jersey is a cow. But so is a guernsey, and in any case each is an island! [Ultra confused] I grew up with pullover or jersey ... now just settle for pullover. And as winter is coming I need several, and combinations thereof.
I'd say jumper, but I'd also call a knitted jumper a gansey. Which sounds similar to guernsey, but doesn't, as far as I know, have anything to do with the island. "Gansey" and "guernsay" are obviously connected, but how?
Yes! Gansey! This was one of my Dad's favourite words, but he used it for cardigans. He was born in one of the posh bits of Embra in the twenties and had a few other pieces of Scottish slang, most of which I have forgotten but I still call plates "ashettes", obviously derived from French.

--------------------
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(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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St. Gwladys
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# 14504

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Depends on where you live - we always had a "front room" (for visitors) and a "middle room" for, well, living in.
Good old Valleys culture, see!

--------------------
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"Careful what you say sir, we're on board ship here"
From "New York Girls", Steeleye Span, Commoners Crown (Voiced by Peter Sellers)

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Higgs Bosun
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# 16582

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
A guernsey is a specific form of a jumper - it's knitted in the round, waxed wool, traditionally navy blue and has various patterns across the shoulders/round the neck. It is designed to allow fishermen to be hooked out of the water without the sweater falling to bits or coming off them.

I have read that traditionally fishing villages somewhere in Britain would each have their own characteristic knitting pattern for the jumper worn by their men. Then, when a body was fished out of the water (normally some distance from its origin), they could tell which village it had come from.

Which is probably why a 'Jersey' is different in pattern from a 'Guernsey'.

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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There is also a huge shift over history; what your grandparents said is very probably not the usage you'll be using. A vast homogenization has taken place in our lifetimes, what with radio and TV and internet. It used to take half a generation for a word to cross the ocean to another continent; now it can become all the crack (there's an antiquity for you, I believe that term dates back to the 1800s) in about five minutes.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
[QUOTE] He was born in one of the posh bits of Embra in the twenties and had a few other pieces of Scottish slang, most of which I have forgotten but I still call plates "ashettes", obviously derived from French.

\My wife, from a not-posh background in Clydebank, uses "ashets" (stress on the first syllable) to denote large china serving plates, but not ordinary dinner ones.

She also talks about "snibbing" (bolting) the door, which to me conjures up the thought of Michael Bentine's all-purpose "Snibbo" wonder spray. Now that does show my age!

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
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That's quite a list! I'll mention only a few, heard while growing up in New York State in the 50s-60s:

Pardon / sorry ... "I beg your pardon" is formal; "excuse me" more common.

Toilet / lavatory / loo / dunny ... usually "bathroom." Called the "lavatory" at school. "Toilet" is the appliance into which one urinates or defecates; also called the "head" or "crapper" or "porcelain god" (especially when vomiting).

Perfume / scent ... always "perfume."

Tea (the meal) / supper / dinner ... I, too, was brought up with "supper" but used "dinner" since school days. Never "tea" -- it's strictly the beverage.

Lounge / Living room ... Brought up with "parlor" but now use "living room."

Sweet / pudding / dessert ... always "dessert."

Serviette / napkin ... always "napkin."

Condo / flat / apartment ... never "flat." "Condo" or "co-op" (especially in New York City) is owned; "apartment" is rented. Technically speaking, there is a difference: you own your condo but own a share of the building in which your co-op is located, along with a perpetual lease to the co-op itself.

Cooties / lurgy ... Never "lurgy." "Loogie," however, is an especially thick bit of sputum. To "hawk a loogie" is to spit it up, usually noisily. "Cooties" are head lice.

Drug store / chemist / pharmacist ... Always "drug store" in my youth, still heard now. "Pharmacy" is a bit more formal.

Garbage / rubbish / trash ... always "garbage," never "rubbish." The vehicle collecting it is a garbage truck. "Trash" is more posh -- rich folk have trash, we plain folk have garbage. But "trash" can be used derisively to refer to social status, e.g. "white trash."

Hard Candy / boiled sweets / lollies ... always "hard candy," never "boiled sweets." A "lollipop" is hard candy on a stick.

Mail Carrier / postie ... always "mailman." Now that women are customarily employed in the job, we usually just say "the mail."

undershirt / vest / singlet ... always "undershirt" for the garment worn under one's shirt. Never heard "singlet." A "vest" is worn under one's suit jacket and on top of the dress shirt. Growing up, I sometimes heard "waistcoat" (pronounced "weskit") to refer to same but never hear it now.

jersey / jumper / pullover / sweater ... always "sweater" to refer to the woolen outer garment. "Jersey" or "jumper" is a style of dress worn by little girls. Never "pullover."

--------------------
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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe: I, too, was brought up with "supper" but used "dinner" since school days. Never "tea" -- it's strictly the beverage.[/QB]
Ditto - except on Sundays, when "Sunday lunch" was followed at 7pm by "High tea" (we ate our main meal in the evenings on other days of the week).

"Afternoon tea" of course implies delicate sandwiches, scones and cake - although my sister, on returning home from school, did have a simplified version of this to tide us through until "dinner" (7-30 - 8pm).

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Like Mrs Trainfan, we use ashets for serving plates. It's not a posh word here. Ashets are used at dinner time, as it's only at dinner that we use large serving plates.
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Penny S
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# 14768

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The dreaded lurgi made its appearance in sound on the Goon Show. As well as adult use for a bug, it has school age use as a variant on 'he' games. If someone touches you and says they have given the lurgi, it is absolutely imperative to pass it on asap, and the imperative leaves the playground and comes into the classroom where it can be very disruptive. It can be picked up by inadvertent contact with the current bearer, as well as by them passing it on deliberately.
I think the Goons would not have liked the way it was used in bullying.

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L'organist
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# 17338

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I've never understood why those from the USA use bathroom when they require a WC. Of course growing up in houses where the bathroom was just that - a room with a bath - we were bemused when visitors who asked for the bathroom appeared dissatisfied when shown to one.

Dinner jacket not dinner suit - and never black-tie or tuxedo - for those semi-formal occasions when evening dress (not white-tie) would be OTT. And one eats pudding rather than sweet (desert is something the black-sheep of the family did in the Peninsular Wars).

The word is scent, not perfume (which is something enjoyed by certain flowers).

People don't pass-away or pass-on, they die, after which burials take place in a churchyard or graveyard, never a cemetery.

Of course, what really sorts sheep from goats is the cutlery chosen for the fish course ...

[ 18. May 2017, 11:41: Message edited by: L'organist ]

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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mr cheesy
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# 3330

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Pants are what you wear close to your skin. The outer garments are jeans or trousers.

If you talk about your dirty pants, about taking your pants off, changing your pants etc, expect a Brit to snigger.

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my new book: Biblical But Bollocks. Available in all good bookshops.

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BroJames
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# 9636

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quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:

  • Pardon / sorry ... For a mishearing or not hearing - "I beg your pardon". "Sorry" was OK, but never "What?"
  • Toilet / lavatory / loo / dunny ... Properly "lavatory", colloquially "loo". (It's not a bathroom unless it actually has a bath in it. Anecdotes of American visitors asking for the bathroom and being directed to a room with a bath, but without a WC!
  • Perfume / scent ... If you mean something applied to the person then "perfume" with the emphasis on the first syllable. "Scent" was used but not for something you'd wear.
  • Tea (the meal) / supper / dinner ...Tea for the run-of-the-mill family evening meal. Dinner for a posh do with guests. Midday meal was lunch - never dinner
  • Lounge / Living room. Sitting room or living room. Although the house I grew up in had an odd hybrid room which we called the lounge-hall, probably because that was what it said in the estate agents' particulars
  • Posh (pronounced with a short "o") ... I'd use snobby for self-conscious posh. So posh car, posh hotel, posh clothes etc.
  • Portions / servings / helpings ... Portions or servings to me are catering, medical or food industry terms. Helping is the homely (UK usage) quantity of food put on your plate, and if it's not enough (or you're greedy) you might have a second helping etc.
  • Patio / terrace / verandah ... Patio = flat hard surfaced area often adjoining house, and often at the same level as the rest of the garden. Terrace + always with a wall (or maybe a haha) at a different level from the rest of the garden. Verandah + always adjoining the house and usually up a step or two from the garden, with wall or railing.
  • Function / do / party ... context specific. I'd use "do" facetiously for a snobby do. Yeah there or thereabouts
  • Sweet / pudding / dessert I was brought up with "pudding" but would now tend to say "dessert." Likewise, but still tending to stick with pudding
  • Refreshments / “food and drink” ... either/or Yeah
  • “It was Nice to See You” ... Nah
  • "Cheers" apparently the royals will always issue a formal toast. I tend to use a mock phrase "Bottoms up ..." Cheers
  • Serviette / napkin ... I was brought up with "napkin" but tend these days to say "serviette." Napkin
  • “Mum and Dad” Addressed as "Mummy" and "Daddy" spoken of as "my mother/father". My children use "Mum and Dad" and (like you) they call us "mother"/"father" ironically! [Killing me]
  • Fanny pack / bum bag ... oh, my. Do NOT say "fanny pack" in NZ/OZ. Nor in the UK either. I remember the acute embarrassment of a US postgraduate student when someone quietly took her aside and explained why people were reacting oddly to her use of 'fanny pack'
  • bachelorette / hen’s night/do ... Hen's night or do ... what is a bachelorette? Well I know the word bachelorette exists, Id always thought it was only ever used facetiously. Hen night/Stag night depending on gender
  • Backhoe / digger ... either/or where I live. A backhoe tends to be smaller. Digger
  • Condo / flat / apartment Flat. Apartment would be an upmarket flat. Condo is an American thing which when written out in full the eye trips over because the first two syllables are something entirely different
  • Cooties / lurgy .. cooties I think is rarely hear except maybe in the jocular phrase "girl/boy-cooties" when sharing a drink or spoon or something. But "lurgy" is a cold or a flu. Yup
  • Drug store / chemist / pharmacist ... I've never heard "drug store" outside the USA ... either of the others suffice in NZ/OZ, I think Chemist. Pharmacy for a dispensing unit within a hospital or GP practice. Pharmacist is always the person
  • Fries / chips ... Chips - except at certain fast food establishments
  • chips / crisps ... funnily enough, as a UK kid I knew the things in packets, crisp and cold, as "crisps," but that world has only crept into NZ in recent years. Crisps here
  • Garbage / rubbish / trash ... always rubbish when I was growing up, therefore a rubbish truck. Rubbish - put in the dustbin (or bin for short) collected by the dustbin lorry
  • Hard Candy / boiled sweets / lollies ... Boiled sweets. Lollies must have sticks
  • Mail Carrier / postie ... Postman even though many of them are women
  • pantyhose / tights ... Tights
  • stool pigeon / grass ...or snitch. For me stool pigeon was always POW slang
  • undershirt / vest / singlet ... Vest for the underwear. Singlet (occasionally) for what one would wear on the running track of for a PE lesson
  • jersey / jumper / pullover / sweater ... Yes. All of these in descending order of frequency of use

And, yes, I'd call a large (usually oval) serving plate an ashet, though the term is alien to my wife and children. I'd wear a dinner jacket, although my younger son would refer to the outfit as a tuxedo or tux. Churchyard, graveyard and cemetery are terms with shades of meaning. A graveyard might or might not be attached to or connected with a church. A cemetery is always a non-church publicly run burial ground.
Posts: 3195 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Teekeey Misha
Shipmate
# 18604

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Dinner jacket not dinner suit - and never black-tie or tuxedo - for those semi-formal occasions when evening dress (not white-tie) would be OTT.


Au contraire. Never a "dinner jacket". My Grandmama used to say, "Potatoes have jackets; gentlemen have coats." "Black tie" is perfectly acceptable for those occasions where "white tie" is too much, because it expresses clearly the difference between "long evening dress" (evening tails with a white tie for gents; full length gowns and tiaras for ladies) and "short evening dress" (dinner suit with black tie for gents; cocktail dress and no tiaras for ladies.) "Black tie" should mean just that, though; not "red tie" or "tartan tie". Likewise white tie; never a back tie with evening tails.
quote:
And one eats pudding rather than sweet (desert is something the black-sheep of the family did in the Peninsular Wars).
Definitely "pudding" - dessert is the fruit and nuts one may have after/instead of pudding.
quote:
The word is scent, not perfume.
Grandmama called it scent rather than perfume too. Odd really, because she bought it from her perfumier and the bottles (invariably written in French) called it "parfum". She, too, used to say that "flowers have perfume", whilst drenching herself in something that made her smell like roses or gardenias and failing to notice the irony. She also didn't seem to know the OED definition of scent as "the characteristic smell of an animal"...
quote:
People don't pass-away or pass-on, they die, after which burials take place in a churchyard or graveyard, never a cemetery.
Quite; people die. They may be buried in the grave/churchyard, but only if that ground surrounds a church; if it is a municipal facility, it's a cemetery. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission has been laying out cemeteries since 1917 and much burial law is governed by the "Cemeteries Clauses Act" of 1847. I've recently been researching my local κοιμητήριον ["koimeterios" - lit. "sleeping ground"], which opened in 1869 as the "Municipal Cemetery."

quote:
Of course, what really sorts sheep from goats is the cutlery chosen for the fish course ...

I have no kin named "Norman" either...

Oh, and always a napkin (even if it's a paper napkin), sitting room (or drawing room if it's more grand) and "I beg your pardon"; never serviette, lounge or "pardon". And here at Misha Dvorets, a vest is definitely something that goes under a shirt and a "wescot" goes over the shirt. (See? Gentlemen have coats; Waistcoat - coat - overcoat!)

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Misha
Don't assume I don't care; sometimes I just can't be bothered to put you right.

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L'organist
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# 17338

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...no Normans in my family either. And the very idea of using a knife for fish [Eek!]

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
I've never understood why those from the USA use bathroom when they require a WC.

It is because in the US, the bathroom almost always contains the toilet.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Edith
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# 16978

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Lounge? Sitting room? Living room? No way. It's the front room.

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Edith

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mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

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When I was growing up it was the other room

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my new book: Biblical But Bollocks. Available in all good bookshops.

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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I still get the automatic suspicion that folks who live in an 'apartment' do so because it helps them deal with the fact that the stairwell to their flat smells of piss. You know, flats.

That's a real surprise, happening recently, well within my adult lifetime - posh people who can afford to do otherwise, living in flats! In the (here comes another redundant term) inner city!

And perfume / scent? 'Have you had a bath?'.

--------------------
"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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Sorry is the Canadian way, even when you're not. Like when you didn't hear what someone said. Never said while driving, where third finger salutes and "f*** you" means "sorry" apparently.

Jersey is something you wear to play hockey, football or soccer.
A sweater is a knitted garment.
A jumper is a dress, casual, and sleeveless. Summery.
A bunnyhug is a hooded sweatshirt, or kangaroo jacket we see the word "hoody" creeping in.

A person who delivers mail is a letter carrier.

Panty hose are not the same as tights. The latter may be worn by men when also wearing a jersey and playing a sport in cooler weather (but not hockey).

Curiously as I think of it, there are pharmacies in drug stores; a pharmacy is a place where prescriptions are filled.

Cooties are fleas, as in "girl's fleas".

Dainties are sweet squares, and brought out a receptions or after a fancier meal.

We use napkins traditionally, though these days it's all paper towel. Serviette is understood.

Dinner is a fancy meal, as in Christmas dinner, the regular evening meal is supper. A dinner can be at noon as well.

We throw trash and garbage into the garbage. We do trash things though when they are toast which can be in combination with getting "hosed" on the item which is toast (you paid too much and the thing broke). You can also be "hosed" if you've had too much to drink, in which case your friends might decide you're toast. They might be pissed off (angry) with you for being so pissed (drunk). "Pissed" seldom means angry unless accompanied by "off".

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Maybe I should stop to consider that I'm not worthy of an epiphany and just take what life has to offer
(formerly was just "no prophet") \_(ツ)_/

Posts: 10576 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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Don't even start with rolls and muffins ...

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Garden. Room. Walk

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mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

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Or biscuits. No, you can't have biscuits and gravy. Ew.

--------------------
my new book: Biblical But Bollocks. Available in all good bookshops.

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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Don't even start with rolls and muffins ...

... buns

--------------------
Maybe I should stop to consider that I'm not worthy of an epiphany and just take what life has to offer
(formerly was just "no prophet") \_(ツ)_/

Posts: 10576 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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Barm cake.

(Mornington Crescent).

--------------------
"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Sarasa
Shipmate
# 12271

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quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Don't even start with rolls and muffins ...

I got used to calling rolls cobs when I lived in Nottingham where an alley was a twitchel or was it a ginney (I also lived in Leicester and can't remember which city used which term.)
Since we moved into a Victorian cottage I've been calling the lounge/sitting room/front room the parlour.

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Previously Gussie.
Newt fancier turned goldfish

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
We throw trash and garbage into the garbage. We do trash things though when they are toast which can be in combination with getting "hosed" on the item which is toast (you paid too much and the thing broke). You can also be "hosed" if you've had too much to drink, in which case your friends might decide you're toast. They might be pissed off (angry) with you for being so pissed (drunk). "Pissed" seldom means angry unless accompanied by "off".

Interesting .. the last is true of these antipodean parts of the Empire, but we do different things with hoses ...

but we might be toast ... like Trump probably is ... (though we think he's mightily pissed off, too)

and I think both antipodean outposts sometimes add a simile to the adjectival "pissed," then remove most of it, so so and so becomes merely "newted" or "chooked"

(a "chook" of course being an adult female Gallus gallus domesticus)

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shameless self promotion - because I think it's worth it
and mayhap this too: http://broken-moments.blogspot.co.nz/

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
It used to take half a generation for a word to cross the ocean to another continent; now it can become all the crack (there's an antiquity for you, I believe that term dates back to the 1800s) in about five minutes.

Sorry, I'm not getting the meaning...slow brain day.

Does it mean what people are talking about?

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
A person who delivers mail is a letter carrier.

This is my favourite so far. Postman/postwoman seems dull by comparison.

Ian,
imaginging my nieces jumping up and down saying, "The letter carrier's outside!" [Smile]

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Pangolin Guerre
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# 18686

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No Prophet.... Are you from Saskatchewan, or thereabouts? "Bunnyhug" isn't an Ontario or more easterly thing, in my experience. I've always known it as a "hoody," and been in Toronto for 30+ years.
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Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
I got used to calling rolls cobs when I lived in Nottingham where an alley was a twitchel or was it a ginney (I also lived in Leicester and can't remember which city used which term.)
Since we moved into a Victorian cottage I've been calling the lounge/sitting room/front room the parlour.

My parents lived in Redditch for some years and thereabouts an alley is a snicket.

--------------------
"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

Posts: 23837 | From: Newport, Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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quote:
Originally posted by Pangolin Guerre:
No Prophet.... Are you from Saskatchewan, or thereabouts? "Bunnyhug" isn't an Ontario or more easterly thing, in my experience. I've always known it as a "hoody," and been in Toronto for 30+ years.

Indeed. Sask, Manitoba and parts of Alberta use the word. I have lived in all 3 provinces. Winnipeg didn't use it.

Also gotch for undershorts/underpants, which "boxers" seems to be replacing. Albertans seemed to prefer "gonch" and some suggested "gitch", which we thought was Ontario. (Ontarians are easy to spot. They say "Saskatchewawhn", where we say "Suskatchew'n").

Sask has a few more. bluff is a copse of trees, not a hill, and a [b] slough[b] is a marshy pond, said "slew", rhymes with "you". A deep slough without marshy shorelines is a "pothole". Fish all have different local names too.

--------------------
Maybe I should stop to consider that I'm not worthy of an epiphany and just take what life has to offer
(formerly was just "no prophet") \_(ツ)_/

Posts: 10576 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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I see Zappa asked for regional differences, not what might be considered correct usage.

I once saw a list from Escape to the Country, a regional programme if ever there was one. They spoke of reception rooms. When I saw what was meant, it was a lounge room with a lounge suite, or a family room as known down here. Children's toys and the TV.

My sons grew up wearing singlets. Perhaps they still do, i do not enquire of such matters. Both underwear and outer clothing can be called pants. As with Biblical verses, context is everything. We wear thongs on our feet.

There are regional differences here. Depending on your state, you may swim in a costume or bathers or swimmers or cossies. Juice in those small boxes with straws can be fruit boxes or poppers.

In winter, we wear jumpers. Vests are usually knit, often in a Fair Isle pattern. V-necked and sleeveless.

Bathrooms not only have a bath, but also a toilet and a separate shower. I live in a apartment as this block was originally serviced apartments for tourists etc. flats are older buildings, usually brick, often Art Deco in style. Units fit between these although they can be rented out like flats or owned as apartments.

I live in what is known as an apartment. I own it. Others here are tenanted. However apartments and units come under the strata titles act in governance.

As to fish knives. I haven't seen one in decades although my grandmother used them. Does anyone use Sine's icecream forks? Possibly similar vintage.

The evening meal at my place is dinner although it was called tea when I was a child. Supper is something eaten after a function or a snack sometime in the evening after dinner. A dessert is the sweet course, a pudding is usually something cooked like a steamedpudding. My family does eat dessert but not sweets which are lollies.

[ 19. May 2017, 04:08: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

Posts: 9147 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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When I was a child we went swimming in our togs (shortened from swimming togs) and we wore jandals (short for Japanese sandals, named by the man who introduced them here). In other places, and increasingly here they are called thongs.

In my last year teaching I was helping the girls in my class of 5 year olds get changed after swimming. One girl who was brought up by her Grandmother referred to her "bloomers". I don't think any of the others had heard the term before and for a while after they would say "bloomers" and giggle uproariously.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 9847 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
My parents lived in Redditch for some years and thereabouts an alley is a snicket.

In Norfolk it would be a "loke". And the main street of several East Anglian towns is called "Thoroughfare".

[ 19. May 2017, 07:29: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

Posts: 8960 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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Yes, apartments usually have a more upmarket connotation here than flats. Flats are usually old public housing rentals. These are slowly being demolished around this fair city to make way for smaller blocks and clusters of new "units".

Condos are something we associate with upmarket consortiums of owners along the Gold Coast. Hasn't really permeated south very much IMHO.

And then there are studios, and studio apartments - very much part of realtor-speak these days. I assume they mean one bed, open plan units.

And here's a word from the 70's that one never hears any more...."den". These days it's a study, an office or a "man cave".

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

Posts: 7028 | From: Canberra Australia | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Patdys
Iron Wannabe
RooK-Annoyer
# 9397

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quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
(flat white, actually, but that's an OZ/NZ thing I believe),

Love these, better than a cappuccino or latte, they have spread up to the right side of the equator.
You can get these anywhere that has a descent barista, though you may need to explain what it is. The important thing is the milk. It is in equal portion to the espresso and is stretched folded and tapped to get more microfoam. The espresso should be a ristretto shot, but that isn't as necessary.

Apologies, carry on.

Advising an honorary Australian* how to make coffee will get you a Hell call. Just saying.

* the home of the coffee wanker.

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Marathon run. Next Dream. Australian this time.

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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I've just seen a post on a NZ website that refers to the rain "persisting down". It's a term my brother uses too. Is it used anywhere else?

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 9847 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
I've just seen a post on a NZ website that refers to the rain "persisting down". It's a term my brother uses too. Is it used anywhere else?

Huia

No, but I like it. On a not very related note - my grandfather used to get very annoyed and would write to the national TV weather-casters when they talked about "bits of rain". He used to say that it is a liquid, so there can't be bits of it.

I'm not sure whether he was really correct, but it was fun to see how much it annoyed him.

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my new book: Biblical But Bollocks. Available in all good bookshops.

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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Rain 'persisting down' exists here as a polite take on 'pissing down'. Is that assonance? I rather like it.

quote:
And then there are studios
Bedsits [Smile]

quote:
And here's a word from the 70's that one never hears any more...."den". These days it's a study, an office or a "man cave".
Shed [Big Grin]

[ 19. May 2017, 10:27: Message edited by: mark_in_manchester ]

--------------------
"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Don't even start with rolls and muffins ...

I got used to calling rolls cobs when I lived in Nottingham where an alley was a twitchel or was it a ginney (I also lived in Leicester and can't remember which city used which term.)
Since we moved into a Victorian cottage I've been calling the lounge/sitting room/front room the parlour.

Large bread rolls with flat tops are muffins - usually called oven bottom muffins.

An alley is a ginnel.

--------------------
Garden. Room. Walk

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Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:

quote:
And then there are studios
Bedsits [Smile]
Ah, but studios cost more ...

It's like "scollops" (whre did they come from?) and scallops.

P.S. "Cobs" can be certain kinds of horses, too!

[ 19. May 2017, 12:48: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Teekeey Misha
Shipmate
# 18604

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quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Large bread rolls with flat tops are muffins - usually called oven bottom muffins.

An alley is a ginnel.

An alley is indeed a ginnel, but oven bottoms are quite small; large flat-topped rolls are barm cakes. (There are also "floured baps", a term I never use because it still makes me snigger like a ten-year-old.)
quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester
And then there are studios
Bedsits

I heard that a lot when recently searching for a home.
Estate Agent: It's a compact studio apartment.
Misha: You mean, "It's a pokey bedsit"?
Likewise:
EA: It's a charming quasi-semi.
TM: You mean, "It's a terrace with low ceilings"?
quote:
Originally posted by Huia
When I was a child we went swimming in our togs

We had bathers (which I guess was short for bathing costumes) but they were more specifically trunks for boys and "cozzies" for girls. (Then they invented bikinis, Speedoes and other garments one might as well not be wearing...)

A vest has always been an undergarment at Misha Dvorets - a vest worn as part of athletics kit was a singlet. A sleeveless woollen garment was a tanktop. Sleeved woollen garments are variable; jersey, pullover, sweater and jumper are synonymous (although I suspect I tend towards "pullover" since, early in my life, I had a housemaster who always called them "woolly pullies".)

And the Royal Mail is delivered by the postman, regardless of gender. Rubbish goes in the dustbin (or these days into one of ninety seven different recycling bins) to be collected by the bin lorry (but only every third Thursday, except for the food waste bin, which goes once a fortnight. What happened to weekly collections and a compost heap in the garden?)
quote:
Originally posted by NPFISS..
Panty hose are not the same as tights. The latter may be worn by men when also wearing a jersey and playing a sport in cooler weather (but not hockey).

I never wore panty hose to play sport. Seriously. When I was at school, the best players were awarded "colours" for sports. Soccer and Rugger colours were marked by a pair of knee-length sports socks striped other than the norm. We always laughed when the Headmaster announced, "I'm pleased to present Smith Major with his First XV stockings." Long socks may be stockings, but we've always called them socks. Still on sports - PE shoes that laced up were plimsolls; the same item but with an elasticated front in place of laces were pumps. We all yearned for "proper" trainers.

The things children (and I) love are sweets; lollies are sweets or flavoured ices on lollysticks.

I don't recall coming across such a thing as an ice cream fork but, when I was growing up, there was a set of "cake forks" at the back of a drawer. The only time I remember using them was for cleaning the dog's claws. I don't remember ever using them for cake.

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Misha
Don't assume I don't care; sometimes I just can't be bothered to put you right.

Posts: 296 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2016  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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"Apartments" are rented within a building owned by one owner or company. "Condos" are owned, so an apartment building may be converted to condos. A "strata" is the company which owns and maintains the hallways and grounds of a condo. A strata may be a co-op among condo owners. A "bachelor" is the term for a "studio"

"Flats" are women's shoes without heels.

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Maybe I should stop to consider that I'm not worthy of an epiphany and just take what life has to offer
(formerly was just "no prophet") \_(ツ)_/

Posts: 10576 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged



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