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Source: (consider it) Thread: potätö_potahtö
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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And then this mysterious idea of a half bath; which seems to have no connection to a bath at all!

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Doone
Shipmate
# 18470

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In this neck of the woods, plimsolls were always daps.
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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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For my wife, they were sandshoes.
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Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
"Flats" are women's shoes without heels.

No, no: those are flatties.
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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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Coffeeterms: what a "flat white" is here depends on your barista and what they think it is. The whole tamping/stretching/microfoam bit is something most do anyway (well, if they're good, and mine tend to be); what varies is the proportion. Most of the honest ones will tell you it's a cappuccino for hipsters. Some will try to make it differently, on the theory that if you're asking for one, you want something different. It's not a standardized Thing IME, even (especially?) at the pretentious-ass coffeeshops I kinda live in.

Complications: what happens when you ask for "chips" in England with an American accent. Or "biscuits." Or anything else that can be ambiguous. Everyone knows that the terms mean something completely different, so nobody quite knows what you're actually talking about.

One that's not on the list: "high tea." Or, better yet, "Authentic English/British High Tea." That one's a term of art, apparently, as American AE/BHT's are likely to be a fancy afternoon tea—crustless cucumber sandwiches, pinkies out, and a fair bit of self-importance and stuffiness. You know, the exact opposite of high tea. If a Dreaded Melton Mowbray Pork Pie had the audacity to arrive at a AE/BHT by mistake, it'd probably make hasty excuses and shuffle off quickly, feeling quite out of place and underdressed for the occasion.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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Plimsolls (had to look up what these are) are "boat shoes". Even if they've nothing to do with boats. Sort of preppy athletic, by which is meant, trying to look athletic but not. If they are designed to be wet and dry quickly, then they're "water shoes".

"Posh" is interesting. We don't have that term. The closest I can think of is "fancy pants", and we hear about people who are "all that", which is attitudinal in their looking down on the rest of us.

And what about "ketchup"? Which is ketchup here. I've seen catsup and heard "red sauce". There is spiced ketchup which is "steak sauce" or indicated by brand name. Heinz 57 is one such, which also is a way of discussing mixed ethnic heritage as in "I'm a Heinz 57". A dog can also be Heinz 57 if it is a mutt.

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Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

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Boat shoes are much more upmarket than plimsolls.

When my son was at school, it was stipulated that they use "Dunlop Green Flash" sports shoes. The kids hated them because, in comparison to Nike etc., they were totally uncool.

Later on, fashions changed and they became The Shoes To Have!

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Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:

Complications: what happens when you ask for "chips" in England with an American accent.

What happens when you ask for "chips" in America in an English accent is that you get a bag of crisps and disappointed.

I have a Russian friend who, when first in the UK, didn't know how to stop saying "crisps". He asked for "crispspsps" in the pub, and was shown to the Gents.

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:

Complications: what happens when you ask for "chips" in England with an American accent.

What happens when you ask for "chips" in America in an English accent is that you get a bag of crisps and disappointed.

I've never had that problem in my travels around England, despite my American accent.

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Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
Plimsolls (had to look up what these are) are "boat shoes". Even if they've nothing to do with boats.

AIUI the word 'plimsoll' originally referred to a horizontal line painted on the hull of a ship to indicate the maximum load it should carry. See this site. I suspect that the original plimsoll shoes had a horizontal line that reminded people of the plimsoll line on a ship.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Anyway, they're gutties (on account of being made from gutta percha).

And the meals of the day are, in order: Breakfast, elevenses, lunch, tea, dinner and supper at respectively 9 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 4 pm, 8 pm and 10 pm.

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Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Doone:
In this neck of the woods, plimsolls were always daps.

Definitely daps in South Wales. Used in the West of England too, but so many of our gym teachers were Welsh!

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(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Jay-Emm
Shipmate
# 11411

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:

Complications: what happens when you ask for "chips" in England with an American accent. Or "biscuits." Or anything else that can be ambiguous. Everyone knows that the terms mean something completely different, so nobody quite knows what you're actually talking about.

Biscuit I think you'd get English biscuits (probably the ones we wouldn't call a Cookie, but the Americans would.). We know American Cookie ~ English Biscuit, but think knowing American Biscuit~English Scone (?? hence avoiding the classic pronunciation issues) is a bit less likely.

Chips, I think would depend where you were. If there were (Uk)Crisps but no (Us)Fries then they'd probably pick up on the accent, if there were Fries but no Crisps, then they'd assume you were speaking English. And if it were ambiguous, I think it would bias to Fries.

[ 19. May 2017, 22:12: Message edited by: Jay-Emm ]

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Anyway, they're gutties (on account of being made from gutta percha).

And the meals of the day are, in order: Breakfast, elevenses, lunch, tea, dinner and supper at respectively 9 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 4 pm, 8 pm and 10 pm.

So when is the time for second breakfasts?
[Biased]

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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This is a boat shoe, also called deck shoe or topsider. Nothing to do with plimsolls.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:

Complications: what happens when you ask for "chips" in England with an American accent.

What happens when you ask for "chips" in America in an English accent is that you get a bag of crisps and disappointed.

I've never had that problem in my travels around England, despite my American accent.
It only happened a couple times, usually some time after Pint Two.

In retrospect, it may not have been the word choice that confused people.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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"Bungalow" is also another term that seems to mean different things in different countries.

I am always amazed, when watching property shows from the UK, when prospective owners cannot cope with the idea of owning a bungalow, as it is not a "proper" house if it doesn't have stairs in it.

A bungalow here can mean any one level house, but does have the connotation of being long and narrow and close to the ground. Small and squarish would mean a cottage. Huge and ground level, would be ranch or villa style.

The California bungalow style was popular in Australia in the 30's, but as most of these were built on a raised platform with front stairs leading up into them, they are commonly marketed as houses, not bungalows.

And we like living in houses with no stairs in them just as much as we like living in multi-level houses. But maybe that's just because we have no shortage of space for building over here.

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
This is a boat shoe, also called deck shoe or topsider. Nothing to do with plimsolls.

That certainly is what is understood here as boat shoes etc. Designed to grip the deck of a yacht, and definitely made with leather uppers. Plimsolls are entirely different.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

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IME Deck Shoes are of two types and worn by two kinds of people: pristine and properly laced are worn by people who have motor boats with accommodation (aka Gin Palaces) or who have a largeish bilge-keeler which they never take more than 3-4 miles from land; deck shows with trodden down heels and salt stains are worn by people who are dinghy race fiends or those who sail real boats (in other words can do navigation with proper charts) and don't get scared if they can't see the coastline.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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Going for a walk in the bush is feasible in some parts of the world. In other places this would imply you are somehow moving directly through a not very large plant.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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Another one that fascinates me, and I know varies even within Australia, is the name for a device you might find in a park or playground that you can have a drink of water from.

Elsewhere I believe this might be a drinking fountain, or a water fountain, and I think there might be some other options, but around here it's a bubbler.

The fascinating bit is that "Bubbler" is actually a brand name from Wisconsin. And it's the term used there, and in another patch around Rhode Island and also Portland Oregon, and in this part in Australia. I can only assume that the company that made Bubblers somehow managed to get a contract in those places early on.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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PS The "Australian Word Map" site lists bubbler, bubble tap, drinking fountain, drinking tap, fountain and water fountain as options for the same thing.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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Ricardus
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# 8757

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quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
It used to take half a generation for a word to cross the ocean to another continent; now it can become all the crack (there's an antiquity for you, I believe that term dates back to the 1800s) in about five minutes.

Sorry, I'm not getting the meaning...slow brain day.

Does it mean what people are talking about?

I thought 'crack' (in that context) was the Irish word craic re-spelt, so in that sense it's as old as the Irish language ...

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Then the dog ran before, and coming as if he had brought the news, shewed his joy by his fawning and wagging his tail. -- Tobit 11:9 (Douai-Rheims)

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Mili

Shipmate
# 3254

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I've taken up soccer the last couple of years and our team is quite multicultural. Our coach/goalie is American (I can't remember which part she is from, but a small monocultural town, as she was saying the other day that she struggled with multiculturalism when she moved to Melbourne years ago as everyone in her home town was white or Mexican and I don't think they mixed much). She confused the rest of the team at training by saying someone missed a goal 'by a hair'. I didn't understand why they were confused as I know the term 'missed by a hair's breadth' even if it's old fashioned and I don't use it. Then one of the team said, 'Isn't a hare a type of rabbit?', which explained the confusion.

The other Aussies have covered most of the terms I use. Our terms for warm tops in Melbourne are quite diverse. I call anything knitted a jumper and we used to call anything made from warm cloth a windcheater, but now they mostly have hoods and we call them hoodies. Even for AFL football we say footy jumpers, even though the modern versions are usually sleeveless and made from a light fabric. But officially they are still guernseys if you want to buy one.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
The California bungalow style was popular in Australia in the 30's, but as most of these were built on a raised platform with front stairs leading up into them, they are commonly marketed as houses, not bungalows.

An American real estate agent would call that a 'raised ranch'.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

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lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
The California bungalow style was popular in Australia in the 30's, but as most of these were built on a raised platform with front stairs leading up into them, they are commonly marketed as houses, not bungalows.

An American real estate agent would call that a 'raised ranch'.

Moo

As I understand it, an Australian California Bungalow is like a Californian California Bungalow, neither is like a typical ranch style house.

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So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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quote:
Originally posted by orfeo:
Going for a walk in the bush is feasible in some parts of the world. In other places this would imply you are somehow moving directly through a not very large plant.

Oh Spicer...

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Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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Ha! Hadn't actually thought of Spicer. Maybe he'd been talking to an Australian.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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[

Moo [/qb][/QUOTE]As I understand it, an Australian California Bungalow is like a Californian California Bungalow, neither is like a typical ranch style house. [/QB][/QUOTE]

The building fad for Californian bungalows in Australia was driven by magazine articles on Hollywood homes in the 1920's. Apparently it was the most popular style for a house here in the 20's and 30's....but adapted to topography and the common building materials available. They were all made on brick or stone foundations because building a house on a concrete slab didn't happen until after the second world war. That's when simple low to ground structures began in America - for returned service personnel.

I'm not sure when it became normal in Australia for houses to be built on concrete slabs - it was still unusual enough to be commented upon by my parents in the 1960's. The suburb we moved into was still being built and most of the houses were on raised foundations or stilts. Being able to park your car underneath your house still seems to drive a lot of architecture in Oz. Although now "street appeal" dictates that the garage is placed to the rear of new homes, often entailing complicated manoeuvring to get in and out.

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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quote:
Originally posted by orfeo:
The fascinating bit is that "Bubbler" is actually a brand name from Wisconsin.

That is fascinating.

Thanks Ricardus; makes sense.

What are the poles used to carry telephone and power called around the world? I recall 5 terms here from something I read: Telegraph poles (east coast, though I hear power poles now); Power poles (WA); Stobie poles (SA/NT - named after the inventor of their concrete ones); Hydro's (Tas - as they carry hydro-electricity); Telepole (Broken Hill, outback NSW).

I recall this website now too.

[ 20. May 2017, 23:36: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]

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crunt
Shipmate
# 1321

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quote:
Originally posted by Doone:
In this neck of the woods, plimsolls were always daps.

Haha! Daps! We must be from the same neck of the woods. One of our teachers in secondary school was known as dapper Dawkins, not because of his natty appearance, but because of his habit of using corporal punishment.

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Anyway, they're gutties (on account of being made from gutta percha).

Or "tackies" to colonial brits on the African continent

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by Mili:
I've taken up soccer the last couple of years

Were I to say that in NZ I would be garotted by thousands of people who run a round kicking a round ball. They are desperately reclaiming the word "football" from other sports. Which is half working, but basically rugby is also called football/footie (and rugby league, if people mention it at all, is called "league" except when it's called "footie" ... but we don't mux [suc] with league players, you know [Roll Eyes] ) ... so its a bit [Ultra confused]

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:

What are the poles used to carry telephone and power called around the world? I recall 5 terms here from something I read: Telegraph poles (east coast, though I hear power poles now); Power poles (WA); Stobie poles (SA/NT - named after the inventor of their concrete ones); Hydro's (Tas - as they carry hydro-electricity); Telepole (Broken Hill, outback NSW).

tend to be power poles in NZ (pylons excepted of course, but they're boog buggers)

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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Telephone poles, in the US. They carry both telephone and electrical wires. (Prompting the bad joke, which I won't answer: "Who was Alexander Graham Kaminski?")

The tall metal ones that carry high-tension electrical wires over long distances are called high-tension poles, I believe.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
Telephone poles, in the US. They carry both telephone and electrical wires. (Prompting the bad joke, which I won't answer: "Who was Alexander Graham Kaminski?")

The tall metal ones that carry high-tension electrical wires over long distances are called high-tension poles, I believe.

Pylons. Power pylons or electrical pylons, or just pylons. I've never heard "high-tension pole." (Perhaps it's regional though.) Most aren't pole-shaped.

[ 21. May 2017, 15:23: Message edited by: mousethief ]

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

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Never heard pylons used in the context you describe. To me, they're the things driven into the ocean bottom to hold the pier up.

Regional, definitely.

[ 21. May 2017, 15:45: Message edited by: Amanda B. Reckondwythe ]

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mousethief

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
Never heard pylons used in the context you describe. To me, they're the things driven into the ocean bottom to hold the pier up.

Those are pilings. (here, I mean)

[ 21. May 2017, 15:55: Message edited by: mousethief ]

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Curiosity killed ...

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Same in all the areas of the UK I've lived in too, pilings to build on, either piers or buildings, pylons as those structures to carry electricity wires, or telegraph poles when they are made of wood.

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Baptist Trainfan
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These are pylons.

And these are pilings.

(Other versions are available).

[ 21. May 2017, 16:35: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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mousethief

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Same in all the areas of the UK I've lived in too, pilings to build on, either piers or buildings, pylons as those structures to carry electricity wires, or telegraph poles when they are made of wood.

The only difference then is that we'd call the latter telephone poles rather than telegraph poles.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

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You're all correct on pilings vs. pylons. Miss Amanda is feeling especially scatterbrained today. [Yipee]

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
[The only difference then is that we'd call the latter telephone poles rather than telegraph poles.

You're right, of course (when did we last have telegraphs?) but the name has sort of stuck.

And please note: there are no (or very few) telegraph lines beside railways any more!

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orfeo

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As for pylons, in California I was told that something was an "orange pylon".

In many parts of the world the same thing would be a "traffic cone".

But around here it's a "witches hat".

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mousethief

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I've heard traffic cones called "orange pylons" but the term is new to me (within the last few years). As a kid growing up, we just called them traffic cones.

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no prophet's flag is set so...

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Pedestrians cross the street at crosswalks. They may have a button to activate the walk signal (which many are certain are not connected to anything). If all motor traffic stops so pedestrians can cross kitty corner (diagonally), this is a scramble corner. If there is a sidewalk between streets, meant only for pedestrians and bicycles, this is a catwalk. If a pedestrian is pushing a wheeled thing which contains a child, this is a stroller.

The things that surround the roof of a house or other building are eaves troughs and they empty into downspouts. A gutter is at the edge of a street, at the edge of the roadway, before the sidewalk.

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Leorning Cniht
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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
(when did we last have telegraphs?

That would be India's Bharat Sanchar Nigam, Ltd., which ceased operation in 2013.

For the UK, I think your answer is "1982".

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Edith
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I haven't seen any mention of pikelets yet, never been able to buy them down here in London.

And surely the past tense of frighten is frit?

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Mili

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Are pikelets small pancakes in your part of the world? Australian pikelet recipe
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mr cheesy
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quote:
Originally posted by Mili:
Are pikelets small pancakes in your part of the world? Australian pikelet recipe

Not really. Pikelets are a thinner form of crumpet, which is a ring of cooked batter with a lot of airholes in it.

The thing you've linked to above I think a Brit might call a Scottish pancake.

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