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Source: (consider it) Thread: potätö_potahtö
Teekeey Misha
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# 18604

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:
One that's not on the list: "high tea." Or, better yet, "Authentic English/British High Tea." That one's a term of art, apparently, as American AE/BHT's are likely to be a fancy afternoon tea—crustless cucumber sandwiches, pinkies out, and a fair bit of self-importance and stuffiness.

So it's a name which uses the word "authentic" to mean "not at all authentic" then? [Biased]

Sandwiches and cake (and, of course, tea - made properly in a pot with no sign of a tea bag on a bit of string!) would definitely be "Low Tea". "High Tea" includes something hot - Welsh rarebit, say, or poached eggs on toast.

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Misha
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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

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Years ago I had a dear friend (now deceased) who lived in London but whose business regularly brought him to the US. He loved to tell the story of how one day he cut his finger and went into a drug store asking for "sticking plasters." The druggist had no idea what he meant, and offered him a tube of wallpaper paste. (Why wallpaper paste would be sold in a drug store is not clear.)

Do you still call them sticking plasters over there? We use the brand name Band-Aid to describe adhesive bandages.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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Baptist Trainfan
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Yes - or the brand name "Elastoplast".
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mr cheesy
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Not sure about the "sticking" part, normally just "plasters". Adhesive bandages tend to be a different thing (as far as I can tell, being a non-medic).

A plaster is something you give a small person who has a scuffed knee. It is a little pad of material and a long arm of sticky stuff, which comes in various shapes.

Bandages are larger and made of different material. Sometimes they're on a roll and are sticky, but they're still different to a plaster.

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mr cheesy
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But then we don't really have "drug stores" - either they're Pharmacists (colloquially known as The Chemist) or they're a few medical bits in the back of a supermarket where there is no pharmacist.

Drug Store sounds like somewhere to buy pot.

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

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quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
Drug Store sounds like somewhere to buy pot.

Those are dispensaries. I think there's a colloquial term for them but it escapes me at the moment.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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churchgeek

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I'm so late to this thread!

As a Detroiter, here are some of my usages:

--I say "sorry" a lot, like if someone bumps into me or I bump into them...I'm definitely the descendant of my Canadian side of the family! [Biased] But if I don't hear someone (correctly), I'll say, "Hm?" in a casual setting, or "I'm sorry?" or maybe "Excuse me?" in a more polite setting.

--Just a bit south of here (in Windsor, ON) they say "washroom," but we say "bathroom" here (a "toilet" is a bathroom fixture); in the US, in most homes and hotels, the sink, toilet, and bathtub/shower will all be in one room. In public, and more polite settings, we say "restroom."

--Here's one I didn't know was unique to Detroit/Michigan until I was living in California for a while: Party Store. No, it's not where you buy balloons and streamers; it's where you buy liquor, beer, chips, some groceries - like a corner store that sells liquor, beer, and wine. Or maybe we just think it's important that our corner stores carry tons of alcohol choices! If you want balloons and streamers, you go to a "party supply store."

--In the evening, I eat dinner. If I eat a meal, that is...I'm a single adult, sometimes I just snack.

--Oddly, my maternal grandmother, whose grandparents came to Detroit from Ontario (so she was local here, is what I'm saying), had a "front room" and an "ice box." I grew up with a "living room" and a "fridge" ("refrigerator").

--I always thought a condo (condominium) was owned and an apartment was rented, but I've heard exceptions to that. So I'm not sure what the correct terminology is. You rarely hear "flat" around here; although when I was living in a 2-family house, I would say I was in the "upstairs flat." Maybe it was the fact that it wasn't in an apartment building, but a house.

--It's pop, not soda (or fizzy drink, or whatever). My dad, however, often said "soda pop." I learned that "pop" came into usage early on, when Vernor's hit the market - the first commercially marketed pop (a non-alcoholic ginger ale originally made here in Detroit) in the US. It was bottled with cork stoppers, which, due to the carbonation (and Vernor's is HEAVILY carbonated - you know you're from Michigan if you can open a can and immediately guzzle it and not sneeze or cough!) made a "pop!" sound when you opened it. In all fairness, this was due to the "soda" water. [Biased]

--I may not have seen it on this list, but what to British folks call someone who practices chemistry, but not in a pharmaceutical setting? What you call a "chemist" we call a "pharmacist;" a "chemist" here might develop household cleaners, or be at a university doing academic research completely unrelated to drugs. Anyway, the store where you see a pharmacist (in a retail setting) is called a "drug store" around here, even though they sell a wide variety of things.

--We have a distinction between "garbage" and "trash." I think "trash" might be more polite. It's what you'd have in a "trash can" in an office setting, or in your living room - all dry, often paper or tissues. "Garbage" is the stuff from the kitchen and bathroom, the stuff you have to take out more often so your house doesn't stink. But I tend to use them interchangeably, especially when referring to a "trash can" or a "garbage can."

--"Sweets" are anything sweet, generically. It's the meta category. "Candy" is usually bite-sized, or in a bar form, and it's also a broad term. But pastries and such aren't part of that category. "Candy" will often refer to hard candy, and "candy bars" include Hershey bars and such. If it's not hard candy, a more specific term is often used, like "chocolates."

--A sweater is a knit garment worn over other clothes for warmth; a sweat shirt (or sweatshirt) is a fleece (usually) garment worn alone or over other clothes for warmth, often when exercising (and paired with "sweat pants"). Pants are slacks. Underwear is what the British call "pants." Undershirts are the thin cotton shirts men wear under their dress shirts. T-shirts or tee-shirts are similar to undershirts, but often colored and printed, and definitely OK to wear alone. Jeans are denim pants. A "jumper" is a dress-like garment, usually sleeveless or with straps instead of sleeves, worn over a turtleneck or other shirt. Little girls wear them more than adults.

--I always went to the movies; my grandfather (who grew up in Cleveland) apparently went to the cinema. (Pronounced, by him, "sin-AY-muh". Weird Ohioans. [Razz] )

--The other thing that's unique to my region - more of a Great Lakes region thing, I think - is pronouncing the letter "i" differently depending on what comes after it, so that it's "ah"+"y" if it ends the syllable or if the consonant after it is voiced, and schwa+"y" if the consonant is unvoiced or an r. While in California, I realized I use this to distinguish words such as, say, "right" and "ride" or "sight" and "side." Although here in Michigan, we pronounce final t's as glottal stops, generally. Say * is a glottal stop - I pronounce my hometown as "dih-TROI*"

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Leorning Cniht
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quote:
Originally posted by churchgeek:

--Here's one I didn't know was unique to Detroit/Michigan until I was living in California for a while: Party Store. No, it's not where you buy balloons and streamers; it's where you buy liquor, beer, chips, some groceries - like a corner store that sells liquor, beer, and wine.

You say that like there are corner stores that don't sell alcohol. I'm not sure I've ever seen one of those. Where are they found?

quote:

--I may not have seen it on this list, but what to British folks call someone who practices chemistry, but not in a pharmaceutical setting?

A chemist.

quote:

What you call a "chemist" we call a "pharmacist;" a "chemist" here might develop household cleaners, or be at a university doing academic research completely unrelated to drugs. Anyway, the store where you see a pharmacist (in a retail setting) is called a "drug store" around here, even though they sell a wide variety of things.

The person employed by "Boots the Chemist" to be in charge of the dispensing of prescription medicines is a pharmacist, will hold a degree in pharmacy, and may supervise pharmacy technicians and pharmacy assistants. They will describe themselves as pharmacists, not chemists.

The shop in question (Boots, Superdrug, ...) is commonly referred to as a chemist, and pharmacists are sometimes called chemists by the general public.

It's not uncommon for someone to meet a "chemist" and assume that she works at Boots - normal people don't meet many chemists.

[ 22. May 2017, 18:42: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]

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Brenda Clough
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In Atlanta, GA there are Package Stores everywhere. I couldn't imagine why the residents of Georgia needed to ship so many things via UPS. Only later did I learn that these are actually liquor stores. Here in Virginia we buy liquor at ABC Stores, which have nothing to do with the alphabet.

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
In Atlanta, GA there are Package Stores everywhere. . . . Here in Virginia we buy liquor at ABC Stores.

In New York they're liquor stores. It used to be illegal (not sure if it still is) for liquor to be sold on Sunday before 1:00pm, on the assumption that everyone should be in church on Sunday morning. Grocery stores that sold liquor but were open on Sunday mornings had to cover up their liquor shelves. It's also illegal to sell liquor on election day during the hours the polls are open.

In Pennsylvania liquor stores used to be called State Stores. I don't think they still are.

Most everywhere else I've lived they're called liquor stores, but most grocery stores also carry liquor.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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Lots of Yay

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quote:
Originally posted by orfeo:
As for pylons, in California I was told that something was an "orange pylon".

In many parts of the world the same thing would be a "traffic cone".

But around here it's a "witches hat".

Except at certain Christian schools where they're called safety cones (witchcraft!!!)

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Curiosity killed ...

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Whereas I would call a shop that sold alcohol an off-licence or, if it was more upmarket, a wine merchant. "Going to the offy" usually means going to buy alcohol for the evening.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
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Our word for alcohol shop is interesting, so I'll mention it. Quite a long time ago alcohol was only available to buy from licensed premesis - the pub. If you wanted bottles to take home you bought them from the pub, and they were called off-sales. Then shops were introduced to sell booze which were not licensed - called an Off-License. The name stuck, even though we've been able to buy it in supermarkets for quite a long time now.

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Ian Climacus

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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by churchgeek:

--Here's one I didn't know was unique to Detroit/Michigan until I was living in California for a while: Party Store. No, it's not where you buy balloons and streamers; it's where you buy liquor, beer, chips, some groceries - like a corner store that sells liquor, beer, and wine.

You say that like there are corner stores that don't sell alcohol. I'm not sure I've ever seen one of those. Where are they found?
Australia. And Iceland.

With the exception of Aldi, for reasons unknown, supermarkets and corner stores in Australia cannot sell alcohol. There are "bottle shops" [odd name now I think about it; never have!] where you get your alcohol, at least in NSW.

Iceland has government-owned alcohol stores. Cheap and low percentage brews can be gotten from supermarkets and corner stores. Possibly other Nordic countries do.

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ArachnidinElmet
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Does anybody read Separated by a common language? It's a blog written by Lynne Murphy, @lynneguist on twitter: an American academic working in the UK, mostly on the pond differences (and more often regional differences within each country) of the English language. Well worth a read.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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anoesis
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I looked at this thread when there was only one reply, and thought, well, Zappa has provided such an exhaustive list, there's not much to say here! Obviously I was wrong. Also, driving back from the school run this morning, it occurred to me there was at least one he had missed out. I drive a station wagon, which I believe is called an estate in other parts of the world...

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When you listen to Bruce's music you are [no longer] a loser. You are a character in an epic poem...about losers.
- Jon Stewart on Bruce Springsteen -

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
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quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
Does anybody read Separated by a common language? It's a blog written by Lynne Murphy, @lynneguist on twitter: an American academic working in the UK, mostly on the pond differences (and more often regional differences within each country) of the English language. Well worth a read.

A fan of Lynne there and on Twitter. Second your comments.
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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Here in Virginia we buy liquor at ABC Stores, which have nothing to do with the alphabet.

ABC stands for Alcoholic Beverage Control. In Virginia, hard liquor is sold only at ABC stores, which are run by the state.

Moo

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Gracious rebel

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quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:
Then shops were introduced to sell booze which were not licensed - called an Off-License.

Not sure this is right. I thought the 'off' in 'off-license' referred to the fact that these shops were indeed licensed to sell alcohol, but only for consumption OFF the premises (unlike a pub bar or restaurant that was licensed to sell alcohol for consumption ON the premises)

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Salicional
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A few local usages from this part of the USA:

- A small stream is often called a run. It can also be called a creek, in which case the pronunciation is usually 'crick'.

- The use of 'anymore' to mean 'nowadays', so you'll hear things like "Gas is really expensive anymore." That one sounded so odd to me when I first moved here!

- It's perfectly grammatical here to leave out the words 'to be' after 'needs', so you get constructions such as 'The fence needs painted' or 'The lawn needs mowed'.

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orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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quote:
Originally posted by churchgeek:
--It's pop, not soda (or fizzy drink, or whatever).

I would genuinely struggle to work out that "pop" was actually "soft drink".
[Big Grin]

[ 22. May 2017, 22:17: Message edited by: orfeo ]

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Gee D
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quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Australia. And Iceland.

With the exception of Aldi, for reasons unknown, supermarkets and corner stores in Australia cannot sell alcohol. There are "bottle shops" [odd name now I think about it; never have!] where you get your alcohol, at least in NSW.

Iceland has government-owned alcohol stores. Cheap and low percentage brews can be gotten from supermarkets and corner stores. Possibly other Nordic countries do.

Not at all right Ian. Supermarkets in the ACT at least can, and do, sell alcohol. Just as there's an aisle with cleaning products, there's an aisle or 2 selling beer, wine and spirits.

The main reason neither of the 2 main supermarket chains don't sell alcohol is that they can't be bothered to apply for the relevant licence and don't really need to. They are each a part of much larger companies and others in the group include well-known chains of bottle shops - a couple of centres near us have a Woolworths supermarket and immediately next door a Dan Murphy's bottle shop; at one of them a Coles supermarket is next door to Liquorland, separate frontages into the mall area but an open archway inside between the "separate" businesses. You do have to pay separately though, unlike the ACT.

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orfeo

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I can scarcely believe it, but we don't seem to have mentioned the one that blows my mind most of all.

Because I'm completely mystified that folks in North America somehow conspired to label the middle course of a 3-course meal the "entree".

It just feels like something that could only happen when people loved the sound of French words but had no idea what they meant... of course English in general probably has plenty of cases!

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Ian Climacus

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Thanks for correcting my ignorance Gee D.

orefo: yes! That confused me the first time I visited when I ordred entree size...and wondered how big the main would've been!

I also recall some befuddlement when I asked if I was in the right queue [line].

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

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quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
I drive a station wagon, which I believe is called an estate in other parts of the world...

They were called suburbans when I was little but that term has disappeared in favor of station wagon.

The ones with wood panels in the doors are affectionately called Woodies -- which term also means something quite different, of course, to adolescent boys.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

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# 5521

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quote:
Originally posted by Salicional:
A few local usages from this part of the USA:

- A small stream is often called a . . . creek, in which case the pronunciation is usually 'crick'.

- The use of 'anymore' to mean 'nowadays',

- 'The fence needs painted' or 'The lawn needs mowed'.

I've heard the first two.

As for the third: I've always thought the British usage of "wants" is charming. "The fence wants painting." As if it had a will.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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Marama
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# 330

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I lived for a short time in New Zealand, and realised that a dairy was the corner store, which means that Hairy Mclarey doesn't live on a farm at all.

This was also during the time that the road from Auckland to Hamilton was being four-laned, a very expressive term I thought.

I was momentarily (in the UK/Australia sense) puzzled when a colleague congratulated me for a making the shirt list for a job. I didn't get any further.

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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quote:

- 'The fence needs painted' or 'The lawn needs mowed'.

That's interesting - I've heard that over here but only in Northern Ireland (and not in Dublin, as far as I remember). Most people elsewhere would say

quote:

"The fence wants painting." As if it had a will.

Indeed. And as if someone (me) was heretofore lacking one!

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Gee D
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# 13815

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quote:
Originally posted by orfeo:
Because I'm completely mystified that folks in North America somehow conspired to label the middle course of a 3-course meal the "entree".

It just feels like something that could only happen when people loved the sound of French words but had no idea what they meant... of course English in general probably has plenty of cases!

No, if they're referring to a dish such as a piece of steak or chicken etc, they are using the word in its most strict classic sense - it is a dish which would served as the course before the main course, which is a large roast joint/goose/turkey etc in a very long and formal meal of a type rarely if ever served these days. My authorities are the Larousse Gastronomique and Escoffier's Ma Cuisine - like you I was surprised when I came across it and looked it up when we got back home.

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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Regarding corner stores and any alcoholic beverages - Not in Ontario, not at all- liquor is sold at the Liquor Control Board of Ontario - now branded as LCBO, They now sell some beer, lots of coolers, cider. You can also buy beer in single units there.

Beer was once sold at Brewers' Retail. A decade or so ago, the stores were rebranded as The Beer Store, which is what most called it anyway. They only sell beer. It used to be that only the big breweries could get a look in, but things have changed now.

They also collect refunds on empties, both beer and liquor, as LCBO stores are not set up to handle empties.

Did anyone get a 2-4 for the Victoria Day weekend, or did you stick with a schoolboy 6?

There was a pilot project a few years back to sell wine and beer in some grocery chains. There was a big announcement, but I have yet to find one which does. Perhaps the pilot failed.

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Gee D
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# 13815

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Uncle Pete, I knew that in at least one of the Canadian provinces, most alcohol was sold by a chain owned by the province. Could not remember which one or ones. As a matter of interest, who sells wine? You refer to beer, cider and coolers.

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anoesis
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# 14189

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In my last job, (here in NZ), I worked with quite a few South Africans, and I remember listening in to a discussion between two of them (both PAs to senior academics), about a few misunderstandings that had cropped up in the course of their work. Apparently, the phrase 'just now' is not in fact employed to mean 'just now' in South Africa, but instead to mean [wave of hand] fairly soon, this afternoon, most likely today, so on. I remember interjecting to ask them what words were used for immediately, imminently, etc., and they said, oh, that! That's 'now-now'.

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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Here "just now" is used to mean the immediate past. "Bob called just now." -- I hung up the phone with Bob a minute ago. (or so)

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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I haven't heard jandals called thongs or flip-flops here. I thought thongs were minimalist undies.

Ah, there we go. I did arrive at the end of the bloomers era, because in my first dressmaking class at boarding school (as a scholarship girl I should have been doing maths but my mother had hated maths and I was a language type like her; she apologised when I grew up) we were asked if we had made anything before and I said yes I'd made my uniform bloomers. Probably the ones we wore for gym.
After that we wore undies = undergarments. A student in a girls' school where I taught in 1955, reading a novel we were studying, asked me 'What are knickers?' so that one hadn't reached NZ yet.
Bathing togs were used for either sex. When did the Aussies invent budgie smugglers? I love that name.
I associate 'lounge room' as Australian for what I call living room.
A sleeveless knitted jersey I know as a pullover.
Sandshoes or tennis shoes were the basic rubber-soled lace-up gym shoes.
I feel I may have a box of fish knives and forks at the back of a cupboard.
A friend and I were invited out one evening soon after arriving in the UK; I can't remember how the invitation was worded but we expected food but went home hungry. The word can't have been supper, since then we'd be given a meal when we expected tea and a biscuit. Perhaps it was 'tea'.
A few years ago I teased one of the cabin staff on a Qantas flight; she'd indicated where the bathrooms were, and when I told her I didn't expect to have a bath on the plane she said 'If we say toilet it embarrasses the Americans.'

Sorry all, I haven't had time yet to read past Page 1.

GG

quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
When I was a child we went swimming in our togs (shortened from swimming togs) and we wore jandals (short for Japanese sandals, named by the man who introduced them here). In other places, and increasingly here they are called thongs.

In my last year teaching I was helping the girls in my class of 5 year olds get changed after swimming. One girl who was brought up by her Grandmother referred to her "bloomers". I don't think any of the others had heard the term before and for a while after they would say "bloomers" and giggle uproariously.

Huia



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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
Here "just now" is used to mean the immediate past. "Bob called just now." -- I hung up the phone with Bob a minute ago. (or so)

In the West African country we once lived in, "Now" (in the local language) actually meant "In a little while". What you needed to say was "Now itself".
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BroJames
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# 9636

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:
Then shops were introduced to sell booze which were not licensed - called an Off-License.

Not sure this is right. I thought the 'off' in 'off-license' referred to the fact that these shops were indeed licensed to sell alcohol, but only for consumption OFF the premises (unlike a pub bar or restaurant that was licensed to sell alcohol for consumption ON the premises)
I think you're right. There were two kinds of licence to sell alcohol: a licence to sell it for consumption on the premises; and a license to sell it for consumption off the premises (an off licence). Alcoholic beverages may not be sold for consumption on the premises at an off licence, and AIUI alcoholic beverages sold at premises licensed for consumption on the premises must be sold opened and in such a way that they can't easily be taken elsewhere for consumption. Some pubs etc. also have licenses enabling them to sell stuff for consumption off the premises, but it is a different licence, and when I worked in a pub those transactions were dealt with under a different arrangement from ordinary drinks at the bar.
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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Uncle Pete, I knew that in at least one of the Canadian provinces, most alcohol was sold by a chain owned by the province. Could not remember which one or ones. As a matter of interest, who sells wine? You refer to beer, cider and coolers.

The LCBO. Both LCBO and The Beer Store are for-profit crown corporations, not directly managed by the government, who, nevertheless, cheerfully
collect taxes, which are hidden, not transparent.

I am just old enough to recall that, up until about 45 years ago, to get either beer or spirits you filled out and signed a piece of paper which certified you were over 21, took the paper to a suspicious clerk in a wire cage, who passed it back to the men in the back who retrieved your order, bagged it, and sent it to the pick up area.

Things are easier now, but in many respects, Ontario remains in the 19th century.

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orfeo

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My favourite South African one may well be apocryphal, as I heard it second-hand, but...

Apparently, the term "floppy" was reserved for the really old 5.25 inch computer disks. Quite logically, the newer 3.5 inch ones (now of course also vintage items) weren't called a "floppy" in South Africa because they're not actually floppy or flexible.

So it was called a "stiffy".

Which allegedly caused a South African no end of trouble in an Australian office, because here that's a term for a man's erection.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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Gee D
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Uncle Pete, thanks

Orfeo, sounds absolutely apocryphal to us.

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orfeo

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# 13878

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Well, a quick bit of googling does in fact show good evidence for the existence of stiffy disk drives.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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Gee D
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Yes, but the trouble at an Australian office, a word not used in that manner in RSA? Not convinced at all that it's true.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
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quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:
quote:

- 'The fence needs painted' or 'The lawn needs mowed'.

That's interesting - I've heard that over here but only in Northern Ireland (and not in Dublin, as far as I remember).
In the 1950s I knew a man who had grown up in Connecticut who said, 'needs painted', 'needs mowed.'

Moo

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orfeo

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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Yes, but the trouble at an Australian office, a word not used in that manner in RSA? Not convinced at all that it's true.

So you don't believe that a newly arrived South African would get into an awkward situation when asking for a stiffy in an Australian office?

Obviously I don't know the exact wording used, but I can imagine a whole lot of variations of saying "I need a stiffy" or "Do you have a stiffy?" that would need some definite clearing up.

And be amusing enough, afterwards, to make their way around to my ears.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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I have never heard of a stiffy in connection with computer disk, but floppy was definitely used. Husband and two sons all were in IT ,so i find it unusual to have never heard it.

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orfeo

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# 13878

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But in Australia they're all floppies. That was kind of the point. We kept calling all the disks "floppies", even the smaller ones that aren't literally floppy.

[ 23. May 2017, 12:23: Message edited by: orfeo ]

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:
Then shops were introduced to sell booze which were not licensed - called an Off-License.

Not sure this is right. I thought the 'off' in 'off-license' referred to the fact that these shops were indeed licensed to sell alcohol, but only for consumption OFF the premises (unlike a pub bar or restaurant that was licensed to sell alcohol for consumption ON the premises)
Agreed (waves a greeting at GR).
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mousethief

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quote:
Originally posted by orfeo:
But in Australia they're all floppies. That was kind of the point. We kept calling all the disks "floppies", even the smaller ones that aren't literally floppy.

The disk is floppy, just not the case. If you pull them apart (as why wouldn't you?), you can verify this.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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Well, thank you all for missing the point so spectacularly. We could have avoided all this if only more South Africans had pulled the things apart.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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An IT guy left some 5 1/4 disks on his dashboard in Australian summer. They were no longer floppies but out of five, four still worked.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Teekeey Misha
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quote:
Originally posted by orfeo:
So it was called a "stiffy".

There are organisations of a ceremonial nature which issue invitations to the most formal functions on thick card and invitations to lesser events on thinner card. They are known informally amongst those who send and receive them as "stiffies" and "floppies."

"My Lord Mayor gave me another stiffy this week!" says a chum of mine on a regular basis.

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Misha
Don't assume I don't care; sometimes I just can't be bothered to put you right.

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